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THE PATH NOT TAKEN: Strength-Based Approaches for Adolescents in Trouble Bill O ’ Hanlon www.billohanlon.com.

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Presentation on theme: "THE PATH NOT TAKEN: Strength-Based Approaches for Adolescents in Trouble Bill O ’ Hanlon www.billohanlon.com."— Presentation transcript:

1 THE PATH NOT TAKEN: Strength-Based Approaches for Adolescents in Trouble Bill O ’ Hanlon

2 DISSED AND PISSED For a free copy of these PowerPoint slides, visit: Click on FREE STUFF, then click on SLIDES Wait about a week for the slides to show up; meanwhile there are others up there you can have while you are waiting. All slides except for copyrighted material I do not own will be there (please support the artists/media producers by purchasing their materials)

3 A DIFFERENT APPROACH

4 A DIFFERENT APPROACH: Leaving the world of illness, explanations, pathology and deficits and entering the world of competence, strength and positive practice

5 EVOKING OR DEVELOPING COMPETENC E UNDERLYIN G ISSUES

6 FINDING AND SUPPORTING STRENGTHS IDENTIFYIN G AND FIXING DEFICITS

7 POSITIVE PRACTICE NEGATIVE CONSEQUE NCES

8 CHANGING STORIES FIXED TRAITS

9 Lessons from a successful child hunger relief project

10 Ma learns to read

11 Milton Erickson helps his son’s friend do better in school

12 LESS RESISTANCE

13 BETTER MORALE

14 THE SOLUTION- ORIENTED APPROACH

15 IDENTIFY THE CONCERN AND THE LONGING

16 Get access to whomever is concerned and find out what they are concerned about and what they would like to have happen instead

17 FIND OUT WHAT’S BEEN WORKING AND PREVIOUS SOLUTIONS AND STRENGTHS

18 Investigate any pre-treatment positive developments and change and how they might be kept going or yield insights into how this problem might be resolved

19 Discover any exceptions to the problem and any insights/resources/skills they might indicate that could help solve this problem

20 Previous solutions to this problem or any difficult situation

21 Discover any area of competence and how it might apply to this problem situation

22 Investigate any social supports and positive role models available to the person/couple/family

23 What advice would the child or the family give to someone else who was dealing with this issues or problem?

24 FUTURE PULL

25 Investigate any hopes, dreams or longings the person, couple or family may have about a better future

26 I want to be a princess.

27 I’ll be dead by the time I’m 18.

28 Ask the person about life after the problem or successful treatment

29 Metaphorical frames to help people access a better future The crystal ball The rainbow bridge The time machine Magic wand The miracle

30 Suggest that the person write a letter to themselves from a better future

31 Reflect and shift by turning problems into preferences in your reflections and empathizing statements

32 KIDS’ SKILLS

33 CONSISTENT WITH LATEST BRAIN PLASTICITY SCIENCE “Neurons that fire together, wire together.” Mastering competence takes deliberate practice

34 KIDS’ SKILLS /

35 SETTING THE SKILL

36 Brainstorm with parents, teachers, the child and anyone else together to determine the skill to be learned and mastered

37 Negotiate an agreement with the child and anyone else to commit to learn/master the skill

38 Explore the benefits of learning/mastering the skill

39 Give the skill a name

40 BUILDING SUPPORT

41 Help the child identify an animal, creature or hero to be his supporter and source of strength while learning the skill

42 Help the child find and commit to enrolling a number of people he/she know to be his supporter and source of strength while learning the skill

43 Enlist/invite people who know the child to communicate to him/her why they believe he/she can learn or master the skill

44 ENVISIONING SUCCESS

45 Find out what the child and his/her supporters plan to do to celebrate once he/she has learned or mastered the skill

46 Detail how the child will handle the previously problematic situation once he/she has learned or mastered the skill

47 PLANNING

48 Detail how to inform/enlist the important real-life supporters for the skill learning task

49 Detail the child’s preference for how others’ can support him/her in staying on track in learning/mastering the skill and remind him/her if he/she gets off track or forgets

50 IMPLEMENTATION/CONSO LIDATION/EXTENSION

51 After the child masters the task, hold the celebration that was planned

52 Offer the child an opportunity to pass on the skill to another/other children

53 Offer the child an opportunity to learn/master another skill

54 PRACTICE ACADEMIES

55

56 ESPECIALLY USEFUL FOR CHALLENGING CHILDREN/TEENS

57 DETERMINE THE DESIRED BEHAVIOR

58 Brainstorm with parents, teachers, the child and anyone else together to determine the problematic behavior and the new behavior to be learned and mastered

59 START THE PRACTICE ACADEMY

60 Set a convenient time for the parent/teacher or counselor for the child to practice the desired behavior

61 The best time to get his/her attention and make the learning more effective is during a time when the child would rather be doing a favorite activity such as: playing with friends, watching his favorite television program, or going to soccer practice. If you are a teacher, the best time may be during recess, lunch, or after school. Determine which time you think will have the most impact on the child.

62 Let the child know, without anger and perhaps with a little sadness/empathy that his/her behavior lets you know that he/she needs some help learning/mastering some behavior

63 For example: (said with sadness or unemotionally) “Uh oh! Your behavior is telling me that you need a ‘Cleaning your room’ Practice Academy."

64 Keep the practice going until the child has mastered it and is bored

65 Restart the practice if the misbeavior re-occurs

66 NARRATIVE THERAPY

67 EXTERNALIZE THE PROBLEM

68 PRINCIPLE: The child is never the problem; the problem is the problem

69 The child has become identified with and as the problem This method separates and externalizes the problem to give soem distance and leverage Thereby it helps create a new story, a new identity story and a new story about the problem

70 NAME THE PROBLEM

71 BEGIN TO USE THE LANGUAGE OF EXTERNALIZATION IN REGARD TO THE PROBLEM

72 For example, “When does depression show up in your life?” or “When anorexia tells you that you are fat, do you always listen and believe it?”

73 INVESTIGATE HOW THE PROBLEM HAS BEEN DOMINATING OR UNDERMINING THE CHILD AND THE FAMILY

74 DISCOVER EXCEPTIONS TO THAT DOMINATION AND UNDERMINING

75 NAME THE STRENGTHS, ABILITIES OR GOOD QUALITIES THOSE EXCEPTIONS INDICATE

76 FROM THOSE GOOD QUALITIES, START TO BUILD, SPREAD SOCIALLY AND EXTEND (INTO THE PASTAND THE FUTURE) THE NEW, MORE STRENGTH-BASED IDENTITY STORY

77 Use awards, letters, social sharing in and out of treatment to spread stories about competence, success and the admirable qualities to others

78 Elicit from the person and his or her intimates or social systems what is likely to happen as the person continues to use the admirable quality to escape from or defeat the problem

79 THANK YOU REMEMBER: You can get a free copy of these slides: Billohanlon.com Click FREE STUFF, then SLIDES You may share these with others, as long as you don’t profit from this activity

80 This PowerPoint presentation was created by Bill O’Hanlon ©2011. You have my permission to use it for non-commercial purposes (like sharing it with your colleagues or studying it yourself). If you want to use it in any commercial (money- making) activities, please contact me for permission and discussion. Permission to use

81 Bill O’Hanlon’s info Websites:

82 Bill O’Hanlon, M.S., LMFT Possibilities 223 N. Guadalupe #278 Santa Fe, NM USA Contact information


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