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Shays Rebellion The Rebellion exposed the definite need for a Constitutional Convention to be held in May, 1787 It also showed the importance of having.

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Presentation on theme: "Shays Rebellion The Rebellion exposed the definite need for a Constitutional Convention to be held in May, 1787 It also showed the importance of having."— Presentation transcript:

1 Shays Rebellion The Rebellion exposed the definite need for a Constitutional Convention to be held in May, 1787 It also showed the importance of having a strong central government to deal with important issues Also brought to attention the needs of veterans of the American Revolution

2 Thomas Jefferson’s View “A little rebellion now and then is a good thing....It is a medicine necessary for the sound health of government... God forbid we should ever be twenty years without such a rebellion.”

3 Constitutional Convention Originally scheduled to begin May 14, 1787 Convention called on May 25, 1787 once a quorum had finally been reached Uncertain if the plan was to “revise” the Articles or “fix” the government

4 Constitutional Convention 12 of 13 states attended with the exception of Rhode Island 55 delegates Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Patrick Henry not present

5 Constitutional Convention George Washington voted presiding officer Significant because they wanted to give the appearance of propriety to the American people

6 Constitutional Convention Delegates vote to keep their debates secret 3 reasons: –Wanted all delegates to feel free to make suggestions –Didn’t want to alert America’s enemies that their might be dissension in the country –Didn’t want to scare American citizens that the convention was uncertain about which way to proceed

7 Constitutional Convention James Madison kept a diary of the debates He is known as the “Father of the Constitution” Madison's Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787 remain the most complete record of the convention

8 Ideas of Montesquieu adopted Frenchman from the Age of Enlightenment "government should be set up so that no man need be afraid of another" James Madison had studied his work Separation of administrative powers The administrative powers were the executive, the legislative, and the judicial. executivelegislativejudicial

9 Montesquieu Executive Branch-enforce laws Legislative Branch-make or pass laws Judicial Branch-interpret

10 Montesquieu These should be separate from and dependent upon each other so that the influence of any one power would not be able to exceed that of the other two, either singly or in combination. Checks and Balances

11 Plans and Compromises

12 Representative Plans How should states be represented in the legislative branch Virginia Plan Congress to Consist of: Two houses –First house elected by the people –Second house elected by the first house Representation based on population New Jersey Plan Congress to Consist of: One House Each state to have same number of representatives

13 Great Compromise Establishment of Congress Two Houses First house called the House of Representatives –Representatives elected by people for a two year term –Representation based on the population of a state Second house called the Senate –Senators elected by state legislatures for a six year term –Each state to have two senators

14 Separation of Powers How should the government be divided? Virginia Plan Legislative branch to make laws Chief Executive chosen by legislature to carry out the laws Judicial branch chosen by the legislature to interpret the laws New Jersey Plan Legislative branch to make laws Chief Executive chosen by legislature to carry out the laws Judicial branch made up of one Supreme Court chosen by the executive branch to interpret the laws

15 Three Branches Compromise Two house legislature called Congress A Chief Executive known as the President to run the Executive branch President elected by the electoral college Judicial branch consisting of one Supreme Court, appointed by the President and approved by the Senate

16 Representation and Direct Taxes How should slaves be counted in determining a state’s representation in the House of Representatives? How should slaves be counted in determining the amount of direct taxes a state owed the federal government?

17 Representation and Direct Taxes Northern Plan Slaves not to be counted to determine representation in the House Slaves to be counted when figuring direct taxes owed by a state Southern Plan Slaves to be counted to determine representation in the House Slaves not to be counted when figuring direct taxes owed by a state

18 Three-Fifths Compromise Slaves would be counted to determine representation in the House of Representatives Slaves would be counted when figuring amount of direct taxes owed by a state For every 5 slaves, 3 would be counted toward representation and direct taxes

19 Interstate and Foreign Commerce What power should Congress have over trade between the states and foreign countries?

20 Interstate and Foreign Commerce Western Position No taxes should be placed on goods or products going from one state to another Southern Position No export taxes should be placed on goods or products going to another country Slave trade should not be prohibited

21 Interstate and Foreign Commerce Northern Position States shall be free to buy and sell goods to and from other countries Slave trade should be prohibited

22 Slave Trade Export Compromise Congress should control interstate and foreign commerce by passing laws with a simple majority All Treaties, including commercial ones, had to be ratified by a two-thirds vote of the Senate No export taxes would be placed on products or goods going to another country No laws would favor the ports of one state over another The Slave trade could continue without interference from Congress for 20 years—until 1808 Congress could place a $10 tax on each slave brought into the country

23 Election of the President Sherman/Dickinson/ Martin Plan Congress should elect the President People are not well enough informed and educated to choose this official Wilson/Morris/Madison/ Hamilton Plan People should directly elect the President Congress would too easily control the President if elected by that body

24 Electoral College Compromise A group of people called the electoral college would elect the President and Vice-President Electors would be chosen by state leaders and could hold no office in the government of the U.S. Each state would have as many electors as they have senators and representatives in Congress

25 Electoral College Compromise Electors would meet in December to choose the President and Vice-President The person with the most votes would be President. The person with the second highest number would be vice-President If no candidate received a majority of the electoral votes, the House of Representatives would elect the President The President’s term would be for four years

26 Sept 17, 1787 “I have often and often in the course of this Session, looked at that behind the President without being able to tell whether it was rising or setting; but now at length I have the happiness to know that it is a rising and not a setting Sun.” Ben Franklin

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28 Ratification Struggle The Constitution would be submitted to the states for their approval after the government organized under the Articles of Confederation approved the measure 9 of the 13 states had to approve it for the Constitution to become legal

29 Not all the delegates were pleased with the results; some left before the ceremony, and three of those remaining refused to sign: Edmund Randolph, George Mason of Virginia, and Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts.Edmund RandolphGeorge Mason VirginiaElbridge Gerry Massachusetts

30 Ratification Federalists vs. Anti- Federalists Federalists favored a strong federal union and were led by Alexander Hamilton

31 Areas of Federalist/ Anti- Federalist support

32 Federalist Papers Alexander Hamilton-63 essays James Madison-29 essays John Jay-4 essays Hamilton feared that a Bill of Rights could be dangerous and would only allow for rights that were listed 85 articles advocating the ratification of the Constitution Most were written by Hamilton using the pen name “Publius” friend of the people

33 Anti-Federalists Anti-Federalists were led by people like Patrick Henry Sam Adams and John Hancock were also opposed George Mason demanded a Bill of Rights if he was to support the Constitution. The Bill of Rights was finally added and is considered the final compromise of the Convention Bill of Rights

34 Massachusetts Massachusetts led the way in calling for a listing of rights that would be granted to all citizens Several states asked specifically for these amendments when ratifying the Constitution Others ratified the Constitution with the understanding that a bill of rights would soon follow.

35 Of the 39 who did sign, probably no one was completely satisfied. " There are several parts of this Constitution which I do not at present approve, but I am not sure I shall never approve them.... I doubt to whether any other Convention we can obtain, may be able to make a better Constitution.... It therefore astonishes me, Sir, to find this system approaching so near to perfection as it does; and I think it will astonish our enemies..."

36 Ratification of the Constitution DateStateVotes YesNo 1December 7, 1787Delaware300 2December 12, 1787Pennsylvania4623 3December 18, 1787New Jersey380 4January 2, 1788Georgia260 5January 9, 1788Connecticut February 6, 1788Massachusetts April 28, 1788Maryland6311 8May 23, 1788South Carolina June 21, 1788New Hampshire June 25, 1788Virginia July 26, 1788New York November 21, 1789North Carolina May 29, 1790Rhode Island3432

37 Bill of Rights Ratification On November 20, 1789, New Jersey became the first state to ratify these amendments. New Jersey On December 15, 1791, 10 of these proposals became the First through Tenth Amendments — and United States law — when they were ratified by the Virginia legislature.


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