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Searching the Internet. The above cartoon by Peter Steiner has been reproduced from page 61 of July 5, 1993 issue of The New Yorker, (Vol.69 (LXIX) no.

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Presentation on theme: "Searching the Internet. The above cartoon by Peter Steiner has been reproduced from page 61 of July 5, 1993 issue of The New Yorker, (Vol.69 (LXIX) no."— Presentation transcript:

1 Searching the Internet

2 The above cartoon by Peter Steiner has been reproduced from page 61 of July 5, 1993 issue of The New Yorker, (Vol.69 (LXIX) no. 20)only for academic discussion, evaluation, research and complies with the copyright law of the United States as defined and stipulated under Title 17 U. S. Code.The New Yorker,

3 Know your Domains.com.org.edu.gov.mil

4 Questions to Ask Who wrote the web page? (personal page or education site?) Is an author or publisher listed? Where did they get their information? Do they list sources? Are there links to other sites? Is the site reliable? When was the site last updated? Is it current?

5 Use Boolean Operators AND OR NOT Poverty AND Crime Mexico NOT New Mexico

6 Wikipedia To use or not? What is a wiki? Why does that make Wikipedia a bad sourc e?

7 GALILEO GALILEO stands for GeorgiA LIbrary LEarning Online GALILEO is an online library with subscription-only information that isn’t available through free search engines or Web directories. Participating institutions may access over 100 databases indexing thousands of periodicals and scholarly journals. Over 10,000 journal titles are provided in full-text. Other resources include encyclopedias, business directories, and government publications.

8 GALILEO at home password choose (August, 2014-January, 2015)

9 GALILEO at school UGHS Website Media Center (Site Shortcuts) Media Center Catalog and Databases

10 Questions??? Tina Graham, UGHS Media Specialist

11 Catherine Crisp Media Specialist Pleasant Grove Elementary Tina Graham Media Specialist Union Grove High School

12 Copying text from a source Turning in a paper written by someone else Using someone’s ideas without acknowledging the writer or the source of the information An act of fraud Stealing someone else's work and lying about it afterward *University of South Florida Center for 21 st Century Teaching Excellence Plagiarism is…

13 Types of Plagiarism: Sources Not Cited "The Poor Disguise" The writer alters the paper's appearance slightly by changing key words and phrases. "The Labor of Laziness" The writer takes the time to paraphrase most of the paper from other sources and make it all fit together. "The Self-Stealer" The writer "borrows" generously from his or her previous work, violating policies concerning the expectation of originality adopted by most academic institutions. *www.plagiarism.orgwww.plagiarism.org

14 Types of Plagiarism: Sources Not Cited "The Poor Disguise" Although the writer has retained the essential content of the source, he or she has altered the paper's appearance slightly by changing key words and phrases. "The Labor of Laziness" The writer takes the time to paraphrase most of the paper from other sources and make it all fit together, instead of spending the same effort on original work. "The Self-Stealer" The writer "borrows" generously from his or her previous work, violating policies concerning the expectation of originality adopted by most academic institutions. *www.plagiarism.orgwww.plagiarism.org

15 Types of Plagiarism: Sources Cited (But Still Plagiarized) "The Forgotten Works Citer" The writer mentions an author's name for a source, but neglects to include specific information on the location of the material referenced. This often masks other forms of plagiarism by obscuring source locations. "The Misinformer" The writer provides inaccurate information regarding the sources, making it impossible to find them. *www.plagiarism.orgwww.plagiarism.org

16 A "citation" is the way you tell your readers that certain material in your work came from another source. It also gives your readers the information necessary to find that source again, including: information about the author the title of the work the name and location of the company that published your copy of the source the date your copy was published the page numbers of the material you are borrowing How NOT to Plagiarize: Use Citations

17 When Should You Use Citations? acknowledge their source. The following situations almost always require citation: Whenever you use quotes Whenever you paraphrase Whenever you use an idea that someone else has already expressed Whenever you make specific reference to the work of another Whenever someone else's work has been critical in developing your own ideas

18 MLA Format In-Text Format The author's last name and the page number(s) from which the quotation or paraphrase is taken must appear in the text, and a complete reference should appear on your Works Cited page. The author's name may appear either in the sentence itself or in parentheses following the quotation or paraphrase, but the page number(s) should always appear in the parentheses, not in the text of your sentence. *Owl at Purdue

19 MLA Format In-Text Format Sample Wordsworth stated that Romantic poetry was marked by a "spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings" (263). Romantic poetry is characterized by the "spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings" (Wordsworth 263). Wordsworth extensively explored the role of emotion in the creative process (263).  Both citations in the examples above, (263) and (Wordsworth 263), tell readers that the information in the sentence can be located on page 263 of a work by an author named Wordsworth. Sample Works Cited Wordsworth, William. Lyrical Ballads. London: Oxford U.P., Print. *Owl at Purdue

20 MLA Style Basics Example of a Works Cited page in MLA 2009 format Works Cited "Blueprint Lays Out Clear Path for Climate Action." Environmental Defense Fund. Environmental Defense Fund, 8 May Web. 24 May Dean, Cornelia. "Executive on a Mission: Saving the Planet." New York Times. New York Times, 22 May Web. 25 May Ebert, Roger. "An Inconvenient Truth." Rev. of An Inconvenient Truth, dir. Davis Guggenheim. rogerebert.com. Sun-Times News Group, 2 June Web. 24 May 2013.

21 . Visit the media center Online Resources-Citing Sources Section for more information


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