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CFN 606 2012-2013 Citywide Instructional Expectations.

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Presentation on theme: "CFN 606 2012-2013 Citywide Instructional Expectations."— Presentation transcript:

1 CFN Citywide Instructional Expectations

2 Current vs. Common Core Aligned 3-8 State ELA Assessments Read Pg. 3 of CIE Changes to the New York State tests – In ELA Look through the ELA Shifts Work the text and questions You have 25 minutes…Get Stuff Done!

3 Current vs. Common Core Aligned 3-8 State ELA Assessments What are the implications for instruction?

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5 CLOSE READING & TEXT DEPENDENT QUESTIONS

6 You have 5 minutes…GSD !

7 What do you currently do to encourage close reading? Discuss with a partner- What do you currently do to encourage close reading? You have 5 minutes…GSD!

8 Find and highlight the reading anchor standards that require students to perform close reading of text. You have 7 minutes…GSD!

9 READ… A Guide to Creating Text Dependent Questions for Close Analytic Reading As you read… What did you learn? What resonates with you? Share with a partner. You have 10 minutes…Get Stuff Done!

10 Step One: Identify the Core Understandings and Key Ideas of the Text As in any good reverse engineering or “backwards design” process, teachers should start by identifying the key insights they want students to understand from the text— keeping one eye on the major points being made is crucial for fashioning an overarching set of successful questions and critical for creating an appropriate culminating assignment.

11 Good text-dependent questions linger over specific phrases and sentences to ensure careful comprehension of the text—they help students see something worthwhile that they would not have seen on a more cursory reading. Close Reading & Text Dependent Questions

12 Jim Murphy, The Great Fire – Grade 6 1. Listen to the text for the rhythm and meaning of the language. 2. Independently write what you think the text is saying (vs. what is the text about?). Let’s Practice “Lingering”: Close Reading with Text Dependent Questions

13 Chicago in 1871 was a city ready to burn. The city boasted having 59,500 buildings, many of them—such as the Courthouse and the Tribune Building—large and ornately decorated. The trouble was that about two-thirds of all these structures were made entirely of wood. Many of the remaining buildings (even the ones proclaimed to be “fireproof”) looked solid, but were actually jerrybuilt affairs; the stone or brick exteriors hid wooden frames and floors, all topped with highly flammable tar or shingle roofs. It was also a common practice to disguise wood as another kind of building material. The fancy exterior decorations on just about every building were carved from wood, then painted to look like stone or marble. Most churches had steeples that appeared to be solid from the street, but a closer inspection would reveal a wooden framework covered with cleverly painted copper or tin.

14 I think the text is saying… Chicago in 1871 was a city ready to burn. The city boasted having 59,500 buildings, many of them—such as the Courthouse and the Tribune Building—large and ornately decorated. The trouble was that about two-thirds of all these structures were made entirely of wood. Many of the remaining buildings (even the ones proclaimed to be “fireproof”) looked solid, but were actually jerrybuilt affairs; the stone or brick exteriors hid wooden frames and floors, all topped with highly flammable tar or shingle roofs. It was also a common practice to disguise wood as another kind of building material. The fancy exterior decorations on just about every building were carved from wood, then painted to look like stone or marble. Most churches had steeples that appeared to be solid from the street, but a closer inspection would reveal a wooden framework covered with cleverly painted copper or tin. This is talking about Chicago in the late 1800’s There is “trouble…” with something… There are buildings made of wood…

15 Sample Questions- Set 1 The term “jerrybuilt” means cheaply or unsubstantially built (it comes either from the English dialectical word “jerry” which meant “bad or defective,” or from the nautical slang word “jury” which meant temporary); what specific words and phrases does the author include to support his use of the term “jerrybuilt”?

16 Sample Questions- Set 1 The term “jerrybuilt” means cheaply or unsubstantially built (it comes either from the English dialectical word “jerry” which meant “bad or defective,” or from the nautical slang word “jury” which meant temporary); what specific words and phrases does the author include to support his use of the term “jerrybuilt”?

17 Sample Questions- Set 1 The term “jerrybuilt” means cheaply or unsubstantially built (it comes either from the English dialectical word “jerry” which meant “bad or defective,” or from the nautical slang word “jury” which meant temporary); what specific words and phrases does the author include to support his use of the term “jerrybuilt”? OSF: The line/phrase “____________________” supports the author’s use of the term “jerrybuilt” because ________________________.

18 Sample Answer- Set1 The line/phrase “all topped with highly flammable tar or shingle roofs” supports the author’s use of the term “jerrybuilt” because structures made of flammable materials (capable of burning rapidly) would be considered unsubstantially built and easily destroyed.

19 Sample Questions- Set 2 What contrasting information does the author present in one of the two sentences that use the word “but”?

20 Sample Questions- Set 2 What contrasting information does the author present in one of the two sentences that use the word “but”?

21 Sample Questions- Set 2 What contrasting information does the author present in one of the two sentences that use the word “but”? OSF: In the sentence, “______________” the word “but” is used to reveal that there is a contrast between _____________________ and ________________________.

22 Sample Questions- Set 2 What contrasting information does the author present in one of the sentences that use the word “but”? OSF: In the sentence, many of the remaining buildings (even the ones proclaimed to be “fireproof”) looked solid, but were actually jerrybuilt affairs the word “but” is used to reveal that there is a contrast between how they looked and actually how strong they were.

23 Scaffolding Strategically built and removed Enables performance (students still must construct responses) Allows for explicit instruction in grammatical features and functions that teach students to independently access texts, learn concepts, and engage in academic reading, writing, speaking and listening

24 Scaffolding - Supporting Text-Dependent Answers and Academic Language Development The line/phrase __________ supports the author’s use of the term “jerrybuilt” because ________________________. In the sentence, “____________________________” the word “but” is used to contrast ____________ and ____________. When the author writes, “______________” he is supporting his claim that Chicago was a “city ready to burn” because _________.

25 You have 15 minutes…GSD!

26 Read polar bears or making a scientist

27 Text Complexity Rubric Upper Elementary “Where Do Polar Bears Live?”

28 Text complexity rubric Text Complexity Rubric for Informational Text “The Making of a Scientist”

29 What is an example of a key insight that students might get from the text? Write 3-4 of your own text dependent questions that lead students to have a deeper understanding of the text. You have 15 minutes…GSD!

30 Swap questions with a partner to compare. How did yours stand up? Find another partner…just get a feel of the technique. You have 10 minutes… Git-R-Dun

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32 Questioning and discussion are the only instructional strategies specifically referred to in the framework for teaching. Good teachers use divergent as well as convergent questions, framed in such a way that they invite students to formulate hypotheses, make connections, or challenge previously held views. Students’ responses to questions are valued; effective teachers are especially adept at responding to and building on student responses and making use of their ideas.

33 Effective teachers also pose questions for which they do not know the answers. Class discussions are animated, engaging all students in important issues and in using their own language to deepen and extend their understanding. They may be based around questions formulated by the students themselves. When exploring a topic, a teacher might begin with a series of questions of low cognitive challenge to provide a review, or to ensure that everyone in the class is “on board.”

34 In lessons involving students in small-group work, the quality of the students’ questions and discussion in their small groups are important.  In order for students to formulate high-level questions, they must have learned how to do this. High-level questions from students, either in the full class, or in small group discussions, provide evidence that these skills have been taught.

35 To truly support this component in my school…  What do I need to know and understand?  What do I need to do?  What structures need to be in place? How might this look in the units?


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