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PŪKO‘A STOCKTAKING AND UH BENCHMARKS FOR SERVING NATIVE HAWAIIANS.

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Presentation on theme: "PŪKO‘A STOCKTAKING AND UH BENCHMARKS FOR SERVING NATIVE HAWAIIANS."— Presentation transcript:

1 PŪKO‘A STOCKTAKING AND UH BENCHMARKS FOR SERVING NATIVE HAWAIIANS

2 A BIENNIUM BUDGET PROPOSAL FY FOR NATIVE HAWAIIANS ACHIEVING ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

3 BY LILIKALĀ KAME‘ELEIHIWA CHAIR, BUDGET SUBCOMMITTEE, PŪKO‘A COUNCIL PROFESSOR, KAMAKAKUOKALANI CENTER FOR HAWAIIAN STUDIES, UHM

4 With great assistance from: Manu Ka‘iama, Leilani Basham, Kamuela Chun, Jonathan Wong, Sumi Lee

5 HE PULE PALE [A prayer of protection] NOHO ANA KE AKUA [The gods dwell] I KA NAHELEHELE [In the forest] I ‘ALAI ‘IA I KE KI’OHU’OHU [Hidden by the mist] I KA UA KOKO [In the low lying rainbow]

6 E NA KINO MALU I KA LANI [Oh ancestors sheltered by the heavens] MALU E HOE [Clear our path] E HO‘OULU MAI ANA ‘O LAKA [The goddess Laka inspires] I KONA MAU KAHU [We who are her guardians] ‘O MAKOU, ‘O MAKOU WALE NO E [We are the ones, we are the only ones]

7 PŪKO‘A NATIVE HAWAIIAN UH SYSTEM ADVISORY COUNCIL

8 IS ADVISORY TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI ʻ I

9 NAMING OF THE PŪKO‘A COUNCIL “He Pūko‘a e kani ai ka ‘Āina” — “A grain of coral eventually grows into land.”

10 NAMING OF THE PŪKO‘A COUNCIL The UH- System Wide Native Hawaiian Council was named Pūko‘a for the above ‘ Ō lelo No‘eau, or ancestral proverb, to describe our work at the University of Hawai‘i, beginning small and growing everywhere.

11 PŪKO‘A HISTORY During 2001, Native Hawaiians at the Mānoa campus formed the Kūali‘i Council and began to hold meetings inviting all Hawaiians and Hawaiian serving programs to sit at the table and discuss how UH Mānoa could better address Native Hawaiian issues. In January 2002, Kūali‘i hosted a System wide retreat and the Pūko‘a UH System Native Hawaiian Advisory Council was formed.

12 KŪALI‘I WAS A HIGH CHIEF OF O‘AHU IN 1700 AD Equally adept at administration, war & caring for the people Unified O‘ahu, Moloka‘i, Kaua‘i & Ni’ihau into the Northern kingdom Built many fishponds & lo‘i kalo to feed the people

13 KŪALI‘I & PŪKO‘A COUNCILS Since the Kūali‘i Council is at UH Mānoa and meets monthly, it does a lot work in support of Pūko‘a, both at the flagship campus and at the legislature Also, since Kūali‘i serves 14 different Programs, as well as 24% of all Native Hawaiian students in the UH system, it has a larger budget request

14 PŪKO‘A MISSION 1. Increase the number of Native Hawaiian students, faculty, staff and administration in the university system to 23%, which mirrors the percentage of Hawaiians in Hawai‘i’s general population.

15 PŪKO‘A MISSION 2. Promote a high standard of excellence in the study of Hawaiian language and culture.. 3. Advocate for parity for Native Hawaiians and Native Hawaiian serving programs. 4. Insure integrity in the use of funds designated for Native Hawaiians.

16 PŪKO‘A MISSION 5. Assist the university in leveraging appropriate funding for Native Hawaiian programs. 6. Increase collaboration and partnerships between the University of Hawai‘i campuses.

17 PŪKO‘A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Pūko‘a’s membership is open to the faculty and staff of the University of Hawai‘i system’s Native Hawaiian serving programs, and to Native Hawaiians who teach or on staff in other university programs and departments. The membership meets once each year.

18 PŪKO‘A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Pūko‘a reaches decisions on policies and recommendations through its Executive Council, which meets every other month. The Pūko‘a Executive Council has no chair, since all are equal, although there are chairs of various subcommittees.

19 PŪKO‘A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE The membership of each campus sends two representatives to the Pūko‘a Executive Council, providing equal representation for each campus, whether it is a community college or four-year university.

20 PŪKO‘A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE All members can attend executive council meetings, but only the elected representatives or their proxies can vote. The Executive Council approves motions and policies in the traditional Hawaiian way, by consensus.

21 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL has advised President McClain that Native Hawaiian students in the UH System would be better served if each Campus Chancellor would meet monthly with Pūko‘a Executive Council members

22 PŪKO‘A represents 10 Campuses Each with their own council of Native Hawaiian Faculty.

23 PŪKO‘A EXECUTIVE UHM KŪALI‘I COUNCIL: Lilikalā Kame‘eleihiwa, Hawaiian Studies professor, Leilani Basham, Hawaiian Language Instructor [temporary]

24 PŪKO‘A EXECUTIVE UHH HANAKAHI COUNCIL: Kalani Makekau-Whittaker, Kipuka Student Services Associate Director, Kainoa Ariola-Sukisaki, Academic Advisor

25 PŪKO‘A EXECUTIVE UHWO: Jennifer Bradley, Student Services Specialist HAWAI'I CC KEPO‘OHALA COUNCIL: Kīhei Nāhale‘ā, Hawaiian Language Instructor [temporary] Noenoe Wong-Wilson, Hawaiian Studies Instructor [temporary]

26 PŪKO‘A EXECUTIVE HONOLULU CC KUPUKAWAI COUNCIL: Jan Petersen, Dean, Liberal Arts Kama Wong, Coordinator, Native Hawaiian Center [temporary]

27 PŪKO‘A EXECUTIVE KAPI‘OLANI CC MĀLAMA HAWAI‘I COUNCIL: LaVache Scanlon, Counselor Lee Ann DeMello, Clerk Typist KAUA ʻ I CC MAKALOA COUNCIL: ‘Ilei Beniamina, Hawaiian Language Assistant Professor/ Counselor Dennis Chun, Hawaiian Studies Instructor

28 PŪKO‘A EXECUTIVE LEEWARD CC NĀ ‘EWA COUNCIL: Momi Kamahele, Hawaiian Studies Instructor, Ku‘uipo Losch, Hawaiian Studies Instructor

29 PŪKO‘A EXECUTIVE MĀUI CC LAU ʻ ULU COUNCIL Lui Hokoana, Director, Ku‘ina Program Kaleikoa Ka‘eo, Hawaiian Studies Instructor WINDWARD CC KE KUMUPALI COUNCIL Kalani Meinecke, Hawaiian Studies Assistant Professor Keliko Hoe, Hawaiian Language Instructor

30 CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS Out of 400,000 Hawaiians in the world, only 4,000 of us, or 1%, speak our ancestral language. It is impossible to maintain Hawaiian culture without Hawaiian language. We are suffering from genocide.

31 CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS Not all campuses in the UH system have permanent FTE in Hawaiian language.

32 CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS Honolulu CC, with 693 Native Hawaiian students, will lose it’s only temporary Hawaiian Language Instructor when their Title III Grant ends in September 2006.

33 CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS UH West O‘ahu, with 158 Native Hawaiian students has no Hawaiian language Instructor at all.

34 CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS Leeward CC, with 909 Native Hawaiians, has only 1 FTE Hawaiian Language Assistant Professor.

35 CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS At UHM, where 1600 students take Hawaiian Language classes each year, half of their teaching faculty, 8 instructors are in temporary positions.

36 CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS Lack of State support for Hawaiian Language and Culture has caused great despair among Native Hawaiians, resulting in the lowest life expectancy of any ethnicity in Hawai‘i.

37 CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS Lack of State support for Native Hawaiian access to higher education is directly related to over representation of Native Hawaiians in the worst social statistics.

38 NATIVE HAWAIIANS ARE 23% of the population 47% of Known Offenders 38% of Prison Inmates 30% of the Homeless 28% of all Welfare Recipients Highest %of all races incarcerated

39 NATIVE HAWAIIANS Have some of the highest rates of cancer, diabetes, and heart disease Exceed the average unemployment rate on every major island Have larger households that any other ethnicity Have the highest number of teen pregnancies and unwed mothers

40 NATIVE HAWAIIANS Have the highest number of children in Child Protective Services, who are being adopted out to non-Hawaiian families Have the highest number of children in special education classes Have only 3.2% of our people with a graduate or professional degree

41 Last year the UHM Kūali‘i Council went to Wai‘anae High School to Recruit Native Hawaiian students to UH Mānoa. They asked the 150 Native Hawaiian Seniors there to indicate on the sign in sheet where they were going to school after graduation. None of the 150 planned to go on to college; one was going into the military.

42 CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS Although we have lived in these islands for 100 generations, Native Hawaiians are marginalized in our own homeland.

43 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL believes that Native Hawaiian access to Higher Education is the only solution to such challenges for Native Hawaiians.

44 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL advises that The University of Hawai‘i, which sits on Hawaiian Ceded Lands, must spend more on Recruitment and Retention of Native Hawaiians.

45 CRITICAL to the Recruitment and Retention of Native Hawaiian Students at UH Are an Increase of Native Hawaiian Role Models on the UH Teaching Faculty, and Greater Support given to Hawaiian Language and Culture

46 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL & THE UH SYSTEM STRATEGIC PLAN Predicated on Native Hawaiian values of Ahupua‘a and Aloha, the plan made Native Hawaiians a cornerstone of it’s vision, mission, and future.

47 AHUPUA‘A CONCEPT: The University of Hawai”i system of public higher education embraces the Native Hawaiian reverence for the land and the Ahupua‘a practice of sharing diverse but finite resources for the benefit of all...

48 AHUPUA‘A CONCEPT: In particular, multiple portals open pathways of knowledge that will provide educational leadership in support of Native Hawaiians, their indigenous culture, and Hawai‘i’s unique sense of pluralism.

49 UH SYSTEM STRATEGIC PLAN First Core Value: “Aloha: Central and unique to Hawai‘i’s university, the Hawaiian concept of aloha embraces respect for the history, traditions, and culture of Hawai‘i’s indigenous people; it reflects compassion for all people and a forward-looking commitment to the well-being of these islands.”

50 UHS STRATEGIC PLAN Goal 1, Objective 1: Design and implement an effective enrollment management plan to improve the entry, retention, and success of diverse student populations, especially Native Hawaiians...

51 UHS STRATEGIC PLAN Goal 2, Objective 2: Foster and maintain a working partnership that focuses on public education (P–20), teacher education, Hawaiian language and culture education, student preparation, and lifelong learning, beginning with a State Department of Education/ UH summit.

52 UHS STRATEGIC PLAN Goal 3, Objective 2: Transform the international profile of the University of Hawai‘i system as a distinguished resource in Hawaiian and Asian-Pacific affairs, positioning it as one of the world’s foremost multicultural centers for global and indigenous studies, and

53 UHS STRATEGIC PLAN Goal 3, Objective 2: To strengthen the crucial role that the University of Hawai‘i system performs for the indigenous people and general population of Hawaii by actively preserving and perpetuating Hawaiian culture, language, and values.

54 UHS STRATEGIC PLAN Goal 3, Objective 2, Action 1: Serve as a resource and facilitate the discourse for an equitable and peaceful reconciliation process between the United States government and the Hawaiian people.

55 UHS STRATEGIC PLAN Goal 3, Objective 2, Action 2: Provide positive system-wide executive support in the development, implementation, and improvement of programs and services for Native Hawaiians; solicit consultation from Pūko‘a, the system-wide council of Native Hawaiian faculty, staff, and students.

56 UHS STRATEGIC PLAN Goal 3, Objective 2, Action 3: Increase representation of Native Hawaiians in all facets of the University of Hawai‘i relative to the University’s efforts on affirmative action and equal employment opportunities in its educational mission and as an employer.

57 UHS STRATEGIC PLAN Goal 3, Objective 2, Action 4: Support full participation of Native Hawaiians in all matters of the University; such initiatives or programs may or may not be conducted exclusively for Hawaiians.

58 UHS STRATEGIC PLAN Goal 3, Objective 2, Action 5: Promote the use of the Hawaiian language within the University system, as appropriate and consistent with the Hawai‘i State Constitution.

59 UHS STRATEGIC PLAN Goal 3, Objective 2, Action 6: Increase funding and provide for the study, development, and research of the Hawaiian language, culture, and history within the University of Hawai‘i system, as consistent with the Hawai‘i State Constitution.

60 UHS STRATEGIC PLAN Goal 3, Objective 2, Action 7: Encourage Native Hawaiians to practice their language, culture, and traditions throughout the University system and provide Hawaiian environments and facilities for such activities.

61 UHS STRATEGIC PLAN Goal 3, Objective 2, Action 8: Employ outreach to address the needs of Native Hawaiians, the state of Hawai‘i, and the world at large in the areas of Hawaiian language, culture, and history.

62 Clearly, the promises made to Native Hawaiians have not been met and we are half way through the time period dedicated to the UHS Strategic Plan. Speaking of Ahupua‘a and Aloha are not sufficient; we must have resources. Aloha afterall is a two way street.

63 We Native Hawaiians are 23% of the Ahupua‘a, but receive less than 1% of the UH budget. At UH System we are: 13.5% of Students 4% of Faculty, and Less than 1% of Administrators

64 At UH Mānoa, where 24% of all NH students attend, We are: 8% of Students 4% of Faculty, and 0% of Administrators

65 Clearly, Native Hawaiians cannot wait for the Hawai‘i State Legislature to fund our programs. If the University of Hawai‘i wants to honor the UHS Strategic Plan, it must provide dedicated funding.

66 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL advises that the only way for University of Hawai‘i to fulfill the UHS strategic plan is to dedicate a percentage of University funds for Native Hawaiian serving programs as advocated by Pūko‘a.

67 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL RECOMMENDS 20% OF ALL TUITION OF EACH CAMPUS BE DEDICATED TO PŪKO‘A PROGRAMS OF THAT CAMPUS

68 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL RECOMMENDS 20% OF THE PRESIDENT’S RTRF FUND BE DEDICATED TO PŪKO‘A PROGRAMS AT EACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE 20% OF THE CHANCELLOR’S RTRF FUND AT UHM, UHH, & UHWO BE DEDICATED TO PŪKO‘A PROGRAMS AT THOSE CAMPUSES

69 CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS 53,000 Native Hawaiians K-12 4,854 at Kamehameha, 99% go on to college 47, 721 in DOE Schools, 12% go on to college 8,058 graduate from DOE 913 enter as Freshmen in the UH system

70 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL RECOMMENDS TO PRESIDENT MCCLAIN That he gather all tuition waivers, formerly for athletes, foreign students, etc and reserve them all for Native Hawaiian students system wide who cannot afford the raise in tuition.

71 CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS 6,828 Native Hawaiians students in UH 4500 in Community Colleges 382 graduate with AA yearly [8.4%] 2,328 in 4 year colleges 332 graduate with BA yearly [14%] 100 graduate with Pd/MA yearly [4.2%] 3 graduate with PhD yearly [0.12%]

72 CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS Of 48,000 Hawaiians in DOE schools, only 12% will go to college 40% of UHM freshman drop out within the 1st 2 years Hawaiians are 23% of the population, but 38% of the prisons

73 KAMAKAKŪOKALANI CENTER FOR HAWAIIAN STUDIES Strong Hawaiian Identity makes for Academic success KCHS majors must carry a min. 3.0 GPA in the major to graduate 95% of KCHS 110 majors will go to grad school

74 HAWAIIAN POPULATION TOTAL IN THE WORLD = 401,162 TOTAL IN HAWAI‘I = 239,655 O‘AHU COUNTY = 153,117 HAWAI‘I COUNTY = 43,010 MAUI COUNTY = 30,017 KAUA‘I COUNTY = 13,511

75 64% of the Native Hawaiian population lives on O‘ahu 68% of Native Hawaiian students, [4,671 out of 6,828] attend UH campuses on O‘ahu 32%, or 2,157 Native Hawaiian students attend UH campuses on the neighbor islands

76 HAWAIIAN STUDENTS BY CAMPUS ALL STUDENTSHAWAIIANS % TOTAL UH50,5696, UH MĀNOA20,5491, UH HILO3, UH WEST O‘AHU HAWAI‘I CC2, HONOLULU CC4, KAPI‘OLANI CC7, KAUA‘I CC1, LEEWARD CC6, MAUI CC2, WINDWARD CC 1,

77 CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS Native Hawaiians as a culture do not like to go where they are not wanted or invited, so as to avoid personal conflict and perhaps physical engagement. Hence, many Native Hawaiians avoid western schools whenever possible, especially in the DOE, but also in the UH system.

78 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL RECOMMENDS THAT THE PRESIDENT DIRECT The Chancellors of each campus urge all of their programs to find ways to invite Native Hawaiian students, faculty and staff to participate more fully in all aspects of the University of Hawai‘i, in fulfillment of the UHS Strategic Plan.

79 PŪKO‘A BIENNIUM BUDGET REQUESTS: FY

80 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL CHALLENGES Since we have had just a month to put the Biennium Budget together, and since we have no fiscal officer assigned to the Pūko‘a Council, only one or two of the following Pūko‘a budgets have been approved by the respective Chancellors of each campus, although all will be submitted with the appropriate justifications.

81 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL HOPES that all Chancellors will support the various Pūko‘a Biennium Budget requests and make them a priority on their campuses.

82 COMMUNITY COLLEGE REQUESTS Of 6,828 Native Hawaiian Students attending UH campuses, 4500 are in Community Colleges & a majority do not matriculate to the 4 year colleges Many do not finish even an AA

83 COMMUNITY COLLEGE REQUESTS In January 2006, Pūko‘a Council met in retreat in Punalu‘u for 3 days to consider NH student needs, and how best to Recruit Retain Matriculate

84 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL RECOMMENDS FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES The faculty and staff of Hawaiian Language, Hawaiian Culture and Hawaiian Student Services [minimum 5 FTE] be united into a single administrative unit, called Center for Hawaiian Knowledge, Located in a single building to be called a Pu‘uhonua [$5M each], after the ancient centers of refuge, where all Hawaiians on campus can gather to support one another.

85 HAWAI‘I CC: KEPO‘OHALA COUNCIL FTE: Pua Kanahele, Kaipo Frias, Kekuhi Kanahele, Kīhei Nāhale‘ā, Noenoe Wong -Wilson 3 FTE, 707 NH STUDENTS FY1=1FTE FY2=2FTE CIP=$5M HAWAI ʻ I CC: KEPO ʻ OHALA COUNCIL

86 HONOLULU CC: KUPUKAWAI COUNCIL FTE: Jan Petersen, Kimo Alama Keaulana 2 FTE, 693 N.H. STUDENTS Temporary: Jonathan Wong, Keala Chock HonCC was awarded a Title III grant in 2000 to fund and open its Native Hawaiian Center. The Grant about to expire in September HCC urgently needs 6 FTE and $280,000 to keep it’s Native Hawaiian Center open.

87 Institutionalization of Native Hawaiian Center Positions The Center offers a variety of academic and student support services including academic and career advising, tutorial services, basic skills remediation and computer lab access, and classes in Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies, like Hwst 107, the only HAPS course offered at HCC, although HAPS courses are required for graduation.

88 Institutionalization of Native Hawaiian Center Positions When Title III funding for the Native Hawaiian Center expires at the end of September, 2006, the programs and services offered by the Center will cease As part of its Title III award the institution must make a commitment to institutionalize services established as part of the current Title III program.

89 KAPI‘OLANI CC MĀLAMA HAWAI‘I COUNCIL Kauka de Silva, Kealalokahi Losch, Kahi Wight, Michael Ane, ‘Iwalani Tasaka, Kāwika Napoleon, Colette Higgins, Kristie Souza-Malterre, Susan Nartatez, Ka‘ili Chun, Chuck Souza, Dennis Kawaharada, Lisa Kāna‘e, Pōhaku Stone, Kāwika McGuire 4 FTE, 707 N.H. STUDENTS FY1=8 FY2=6

90 KAUA‘I CC MAKALOA COUNCIL KAUA‘I COMMUNITY COLLEGE: ‘Ilei Beniamina, Dennis Chun, Ka‘imi Summers, Summer Helms, Kamuela Aea, Kalani Simeona, Jill Kouchi, Malia Chock, Lyra Ransone 2 FTE; 235 NH STUDENTS FY1=1FTE FY2=3FTE CIP=$5M

91 LEEWARD CC NĀ ‘EWA COUNCIL LEEWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE: Momi Kamahele, Ku‘uipo Cummings, Kehau Pu‘u, Lucy Gay, Randall Francisco, Ka‘eo Bradford, Pat Kamalani Hurley, Bill Souza, Milton Anderson, Kanani Baker, Patsy Lee Dudoit 3FTE, 909 NH STUDENTS FY1=5FTE FY2=5FTE CIP=$5M

92 WINDWARD CC KE KUMUPALI COUNCIL WINDWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE: Kalani Meinecke, Keliko Hoe, Loke Kenolio, Kapulani Landgraf 2 FTE, 550 NH STUDENTS FY1=2FTE FY2=5FTE CIP=$5M

93 PŪKO‘A REQUESTS FY FOR UHCC’s

94 PŪKO‘A UH SYSTEM REQUESTS: FY

95 UH HILO HANAKAHI COUNCIL Kīpuka - Title III Native Hawaiian Student Support Program: Kalani Makekau- Whittaker Hawaiian Leadership Development Program: Gail Makuakane-Lundin Minority Access and Achievement Program: Ginger Hamilton Nā Pua No‘eau Program for Gifted and Talented Hawaiian Youth: David Sing, Kalani Flores, Pearla Ha‘alilo, U‘ilani Lima

96 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL PROGRAMS

97 PŪKO‘A REQUESTS FY

98

99 PŪKO‘A UH MĀNOA REQUESTS: FY

100 KUALI‘I COUNCIL HAS 14 NH SERVING PROGRAMS Kūali‘i Council advises the Chancellor of UH Mānoa on aspects concerning Native Hawaiians at UHM

101 KŪALI‘I COUNCIL PROGRAMS

102

103

104 UH MĀNOA KŪALI‘I COUNCIL: Academy of Creative Media: Merata Mita Ho‘okulāiwi Hawaiian Teacher Education: Margie Maaka, Kalehua Krug, Pohai Schultz, Keali‘i Gora Ethnic Studies: Davianna McGregor Hawaiian Art: Maile Andrade Hawaiian Engineering: Joshua Ka ʻ akua

105 UH MĀNOA KŪALI‘I COUNCIL: Kawaihuelani Hawaiian Language Department: Kekeha Solis, No‘eau Warner, Kaiwipuni Lipe, Naomi Losch, Kapā Oliveira, Keawe Lopes, Tracie Lopes, Kaliko Baker, Haili Baker, Leilani Basham, U‘ilani Bobbitt, Keoki Faria, ‘Ioli‘i Hawkins, Lalepa Koga, Kawehi Lucas, Malia Nobriga, Puakea Nogelmeier, Maya Saffery, Ipo Wong, Laiana Wong

106 UH MĀNOA KŪALI‘I COUNCIL: Hawaiian Music: Vicky Holt-Takamine, Iokepa DeSantos, Nola Nahulu, Noelani Zuttermeister, Peter Medeiros Haumana Biomedical Research Program: Healani Chang ‘Ike Ao Pono: Nālani Minton ‘Imi Hō ‘ala Health Careers Opportunity Program: Nanette Judd Intercollegiate Athletics: Marilyn Moniz- Kaho‘ohanohano

107 UH MĀNOA KŪALI‘I COUNCIL: Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies: Lilikalā Kame‘eleihiwa, Jonathan Osorio, Kanalu Young, Carlos Andrade, Pi‘ilani Ka‘aloa, April Drexel, Mehanaokala Hind, Kekai Perry, Levon Ohai, Marvlee Naukana-Gilding, Tino Ramirez, Lia O’Neill Keawe Kānewai Lo‘i: Pōmaika‘i Kaniaupio-Crozier, Kat Latham Kūle‘a: Ioane Ho‘omanawanui

108 UH MĀNOA KŪALI‘I COUNCIL: Native Hawaiian Center of Excellence: Ben Young, Martina Kamaka Native Hawaiian Leadership Project: Manu Ka‘iama Nā Pua No‘eau Program for Gifted and Talented Hawaiian Youth: Kinohi Gomes Pūko‘a/Kūali‘i Coordinator: Hau‘oli Busby Social Work: Val Kanuha

109 PŪKO‘A REQUESTS FY FOR UHM

110 PŪKO‘A REQUESTS FY FOR UHM CONT.

111 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL RECOMMENDS TO PRESIDENT MCCLAIN That he reinstate Native Hawaiian Issues as one of the 4 categories that he supports in every Biennium and Supplemental. This year that category has been changed to “Address Underserved Populations/Regions” This change does not follow the recommendations of the UH System Strategic Plan

112 PŪKO‘A COUNCIL RECOMMENDS TO PRESIDENT MCCLAIN That he since he placed Native Hawaiian Programs in the bottom third tier of the UH Supplemental Budget 2006 where they will not be funded, That in this Biennium Budget 07-09, Native Hawaiian Pūko‘a Requests be place at the top of his budget requests, especially since they are only about 1% of the total budget.

113 POSSIBLE FUNDING SOURCES University of Hawai‘i: Tuition Revenues RTRF for New Research Legislative Funding of the Biennium Budget

114 POSSIBLE FUNDING SOURCES University of Hawai‘i: System Yearly Income = $588M UH use of Ceded Lands = 20% 20% of $588M = $118M 2% of $588M = $11 M

115 POSSIBLE FUNDING SOURCES University of Hawai‘i: President’s Yearly RTRF = $14M UHM Chancellor RTRF = $14M 20% of $14M = $2.8M

116 POSSIBLE FUNDING SOURCES Hawaiian Monies: Kamehameha OHA In partnership with UH

117 Example: OHA Grant of $1.5M to KAMAKAKUOKALANI Center for Hawaiian Studies over 5 years [$300,00 /year]

118 THE PŪKO‘A COUNCIL ALSO RECOMMENDS THAT THE PRESIDENT TAKE FOR ADOPTION TO THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI’I BOARD OF REGENTS THE FOLLOWING PŪKO‘A POLICIES:

119 POLICY 1: STATEMENT OF POLICY ON THE STATUS OF NATIVE HAWAIIANS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I I. INTRODUCTION The University of Hawai‘i recognizes the unique political status Native Hawaiians have with the United States and Hawai‘i State governments, respectively. Furthermore, the University of Hawai‘i recognizes the important role it plays as a State institution of higher education in addressing societal and educational challenges facing Native Hawaiians as a political entity.

120 POLICY 1 CONTINUED This policy establishes the administrative framework to ensure compliance with applicable federal and state statutes, rules, regulations, city and county ordinance, and provisions in the collective bargaining agreements relative to Native Hawaiians at the University of Hawai‘i.

121 POLICY 1 CONTINUED II. POLICY It is the policy of the University of Hawai‘i: A. To provide positive system-wide executive support in the development, implementation and improvement of programs and services for Native Hawaiians. B. To increase representation of Native Hawaiians in all facets of the University of Hawai‘i relative to the University’s efforts on affirmative action and equal employment opportunities in its educational mission and as an employer.

122 POLICY 1 CONTINUED C. To support full participation of Native Hawaiians in all initiatives and programs of the University. Such initiatives and programs may or may not be conducted exclusively for Hawaiians. D. To solicit actively consultation from Pūko‘a, the system wide council formed by Native Hawaiian faculty, staff and students.

123 POLICY 1 CONTINUED The policy is consistent with the University of Hawai‘i’s strategic plan in the following ways: Providing Access to Quality Educational Experiences and Service to the State Responsiveness to State Needs Respect and Diversity Hawaiian, Asian, Pacific and International Role Special Identity

124 POLICY 1 CONTINUED An increase of Native Hawaiian participation will benefit the University of Hawai‘i by developing a resource that has not been fully utilized. This untapped resource will provide the University and the State with individuals who will contribute to the development and leadership of the State and the Nation. While many Native Hawaiian students are not assessed by their secondary schools to have high potential, they do exceptionally well when appropriate program and curriculum changes and support are provided. This policy will assist in raising the educational status of Native Hawaiians who are under- represented throughout the University of Hawai‘i. March 28, 2002

125 POLICY 2: STATEMENT OF POLICY ON THE STATUS OF THE STUDY OF NATIVE HAWAIIAN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I I. INTRODUCTION The University of Hawai‘i, as a system of campuses, recognizes that the State of Hawai‘i has two official languages, Hawaiian and English. Furthermore, the University of Hawai‘i recognizes that the Constitution of the State of Hawai‘i requires unique promotion of the study of Hawaiian language, culture, and history for

126 POLICY 2 CONTINUED everyone in the state, and has a moral obligation to protect the rights of Native Hawaiians to practice their traditional and customary rights which include their language, culture, and other aspects of their identity on lands occupied by the University of Hawai‘i and elsewhere. (Hawai‘i State Constitution: Article XV, section four; Article X, section four; Article XII, section seven).

127 POLICY 2 CONTINUED II. POLICY It is the policy of the University of Hawai‘i: A. To provide for and promote the use of both of Hawaiian and English as languages of operation within the University of Hawai‘i system for the people of Hawai‘i.

128 POLICY 2 CONTINUED B. To provide for the study of Hawaiian language, culture and history within the University of Hawai‘i system with a level of support beyond that which it provides for the study of non-Hawaiian language, culture and history.

129 POLICY 2 CONTINUED C. To encourage Native Hawaiians to practice their language, culture and other aspects of their traditional and customary rights throughout all University of Hawai‘i campuses and provide specific Hawaiian environments and facilities for such activities.

130 POLICY 2 CONTINUED D. To address the needs of Native Hawaiians, the state of Hawai‘i, and the world at large, in the area of Hawaiian language, culture and history through outreach. March 28, 2002

131 So that we may fulfill our dreams

132 For the next generation of Hawaiians

133 and into the 21st Century

134 E OLA MAU KA LĀHUI HAWAI‘I Ā MAU LOA AKU Let the Hawaiian People live forever Let the Native People of the Earth live forever

135


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