Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

House Appropriations Subcommittee on Article II October 6, 2014 Veronda L. Durden, Commissioner Strategic Fiscal Review.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "House Appropriations Subcommittee on Article II October 6, 2014 Veronda L. Durden, Commissioner Strategic Fiscal Review."— Presentation transcript:

1 House Appropriations Subcommittee on Article II October 6, 2014 Veronda L. Durden, Commissioner Strategic Fiscal Review

2 2 Vision and Mission DARS Vision A Texas where people with disabilities and families with children who have developmental delays enjoy the same opportunities as other Texans to pursue independent and productive lives DARS Mission To work in partnership with Texans with disabilities and families with children who have developmental delays to improve the quality of their lives and to enable their full participation in society

3 3 DARS achieves its mission by Assisting Texans with disabilities to find or retain employment Serving children with developmental disabilities and delays, Autism, and blindness to meet educational and developmental goals Helping Texans with disabilities live independently Helping survivors of traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries to regain functionality and independence Making disability determinations for Texans who apply for Social Security benefits DARS services are time limited and intended to eliminate or reduce the need for ongoing supports from other public benefits and services Mission and Responsibilities

4 DARS Overview DARS provided services to more than 560,000 Texans in fiscal year 2013—of those, about 230,000 received direct services and another 330,000 were social security disability claimants DARS employs more than 2,800 staff Approximately 90 percent of staff work with direct delivery programs, serving consumers through 146 field offices At 12.4 percent, the agency has a lower turnover rate than the statewide average of 17.6 percent Approximately 79 percent of DARS workforce has more than five years of state service and 57 percent have more than ten years of service Total funding for DARS for the 2014-15 biennium is $1.242 billion, of which 75 percent is federal—DARS receives most federal funds through the U.S. Department of Education and the Social Security Administration 4

5 Strategic Fiscal Review DARS is currently undergoing the Sunset review process As a result, only GR or GR-related funded programs were chosen for Strategic Fiscal Review (SFR) DARS programs subject to SFR: Autism Blind Children’s Vocational Discovery and Development Program Blindness Education, Screening and Treatment Business Enterprises of Texas Business Enterprises of Texas – Trust Fund Comprehensive Rehabilitative Services Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services – Education and Training Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services – Interpreter Certification Early Childhood Intervention – Respite 5

6 Autism Program The Autism Program provides treatment services to children with autism through contracts with community organizations in six areas of Texas – Dallas, Ft. Worth, Houston, Rosenberg, Austin, and San Antonio. DARS will be expanding into El Paso and Corpus Christi in fiscal year 2015 The goal of the program is to achieve improvements in cognitive and social functioning, with the potential to positively impact a child’s developmental trajectory The Autism Program serves children who: Are three through fifteen years of age Have a diagnosis on the autism spectrum Are Texas residents Services include applied behavioral analysis (ABA) and other positive behavior support strategies in both individual or group settings Parent training is a requirement Based on pre- and post-testing, 48 to 62 percent of children exiting the program improved their social communication, motor, behavior and adaptive skills Autism Program contractors bill private insurance, when available, and each family must participate in the cost of services based on a sliding fee scale Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is the fastest-growing serious developmental disability in the United States and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 68 children may have ASD 6

7 Autism Program History 2007: The Governor and the Legislative Budget Board directed the Health and Human Services Commission to transfer $5 million to DARS to provide services, such as applied behavior analysis, to children ages three to eight with autism 2008: DARS awarded contracts to four community-based organizations in Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston and Rosenberg to begin services on March 13, 2008 2009: DARS awarded two additional contracts for services in Austin and San Antonio 2014: DARS began to offer two distinct services – comprehensive and focused, and performed a competitive procurement for two additional providers Legal Citations Human Resources Code, Chapter 111, Sec. 111.051 Human Resources Code, Chapter 117 Government Code, Chapter 531, Sec. 531.0055 TAC, Title 40, Part 2, Chapter 105 7

8 8 Autism Program In fiscal year 2014, DARS developed a plan to increase the number of children served in the program. As part of the plan, DARS worked with The University of Texas at Austin (UT) to: Research evidence-based treatment modalities Analyze outcome data for children in the Autism Program Make recommendations for changes to the Autism Program to serve more children with autism while continuing to make a measurable improvement in their behavior and development To supplement research done by UT, DARS: Held public hearings in El Paso, Dallas, and San Antonio in January 2014 to obtain public input Obtained input from current Autism Program providers Performed internal research on treatment for autism, and attended numerous research and professional conferences related to autism

9 9 Autism Program Based on the report from UT (www.dars.state.tx.us/stakeholders/autism) and other stakeholder input, DARS has modified the Autism Program for FY 2015 to offer two distinct treatment services: Comprehensive ABA Services: Serve children ages three through five 16-20 treatment hours per week Maximum of 24 consecutive months Focused ABA Services: Serve children ages three through 15 Maximum of 30 treatment hours per month Maximum of 24 nonconsecutive months Children may access services at various milestones of development DARS will pilot an innovative treatment program in fiscal year 2015

10 Autism Program 10 Estimated FY 2014 GR - R Estimated FY 2014 All Funds Budgeted FY 2015 GR - R Budgeted FY 2015 All Funds FY 2014-15 GR – R FY 2014-15 All Funds $ 4,487,800 $ 4,503,056$ 4,623,056 $ 8,990,856 $ 9,110,856 Performance Measures201320142015 Number of Children Receiving Comprehensive Autism Services199238181 Number of Children Receiving Focused Autism Services124 Average Monthly Cost Per Child Receiving Comprehensive Services $1,370$1,571$1,724 Average Monthly Cost Per Child Receiving Focused Services$591 Other Measures Average Length of Enrollment for Children Exiting Program 15.2 months 16.4 months Interest List Number of Children on Contractor Interest List (end of year)1,0341,122 Funding Collected by Contractors Insurance$287,339$267,230 Family Cost Share$309,763$285,948

11 The Blind Children’s Vocational Discovery and Development Program (BCVDDP) serves children birth through age 22 who have a severe vision loss The goal of the program is to assist children with a severe vision loss to maximize their potential in education and employment The BCVDDP: Provides tools, equipment, and training to help children develop the confidence and competence needed to be an active part of their community Works closely with schools to monitor the child’s progress Provides training in food preparation, money management, recreational activities, grooming, and other daily living activities Provides information and referral to families about other resources, including vocational rehabilitation Approximately 77 percent of children exiting the program had a successful closure and achieved the desired outcome of services It is estimated that there are more than 59,000 children under the age of 17 in Texas who are blind or have a visual impairment and that number is expected to increase to more than 62,000 children by 2017 11 Blind Children’s Vocational Discovery and Development Program

12 History 1943: Texas began operating a program to serve children who are blind and visually impaired 1990: The program enrolls as a Medicaid Targeted Case Management provider for Medicaid-eligible children who are blind and visually impaired 2004: Vision screening services, vision restoration services for temporary vision impairments, and respite services for parents of severely disabled blind children were eliminated to remain within available appropriation Legal Citations Human Resources Code, Chapter 91, Sec. 91.028 Human Resources Code, Chapter 117, Sec. 117.073 TAC Title 40, Part 2, Chapter 106, Subchapter I, §106.1401-106.1415 12

13 Blind Children’s Vocational Discovery and Development Program 13 Estimated FY 2014 GR – R Estimated FY 2014 All Funds Budgeted FY 2015 GR – R Budgeted FY 2015 All Funds FY 2014-15 GR - R FY 2014-15 All Funds $ 4,370,275$ 4,819,375$ 4,392,066$ 4,830,315$ 8,762,341$ 9,649,690 Performance Measures201320142015 Number of Children Receiving Blindness Services Per Year 4,4174,3344,311 Average Monthly Cost per Child$107$109 Other Measures Average Length of Service for Children Successfully Completing Planned Services 5 Years, 4 Months 5 Years, 7 Months

14 The Blindness Education, Screening and Treatment (BEST) program provides vision screening and eye medical treatment services to adult Texans The goal of the program is to help eligible Texans prevent blindness BEST services include: Non-diagnostic vision screening services Treatment services for persons with qualifying eye conditions who do not have insurance or other resources to pay for services BEST vision screenings are provided at locations across the state and, if necessary, individuals are referred to an eye care professional for further evaluation BEST treatment eligibility requirements: Referral from physician or optometrist for eye medical treatment Texas resident A qualifying eye condition Are not covered under an adequate health benefit plan The BEST program is funded with a voluntary $1 donation when Texans apply for and renew their driver’s licenses or DPS-issued identification cards 14 Blindness Education, Screening and Treatment Program

15 History 1997: The 75 th Legislature establishes the BEST Program 2002: BEST eliminates education services to remain within available appropriations Legal Citations Human Resources Code, Chapter 91, Sec. 91.027 Transportation Code § 521.421(j) and §521.422(b) TAC, Title 40, Part 2, Chapter 106, Subchapter J, §106.1601-106.1609 15 Blindness Education, Screening and Treatment Program

16 16 Estimated FY 2014 GR – R Estimated FY 2014 All Funds Budgeted FY 2015 GR - R Budgeted FY 2015 All Funds FY 2014-15 GR - R FY 2014-15 All Funds $ 455,789 $ 400,743 $ 856,532 Performance Measures201320142015 Number of Consumers Receiving Screenings and Treatment Services 4,4343,2153,035 Average Cost of Individual Served by BEST$97$142$132

17 The Business Enterprises of Texas (BET) program trains and licenses persons who are blind to operate vending and food service facilities on federal, state, and other properties The goal of the BET program is to provide business opportunities to Texans who are blind Eligible BET managers must: Be blind and referred by the DARS Vocational Rehabilitation program; Be 18 years old, a Texas resident and a U.S. citizen; and Complete all DARS and BET assessment and training requirements BET managers operate 120 facilities including: Lackland Air Force Base (San Antonio) Internal Revenue Service Snack Bar (Austin) NASA Snack Bar (Houston) Alfred Hughes Prison Vending (Gatesville) BET businesses employ more than 1,600 Texans, many with disabilities The program is operated under the authority of the federal Randolph-Sheppard Act 17 Business Enterprises of Texas Program

18 Business Enterprises of Texas Trust Fund The BET Trust Fund is the method by which benefits are provided to current BET managers Trust fund revenues are generated by the program from commissions from vending machines in Texas located exclusively on federal properties The annual fund disbursement is limited to revenues and interest earned during the prior year There are currently 118 managers in the BET program 18

19 Business Enterprises of Texas Program History 1936: Federal Randolph-Sheppard Act passed 1936: The first BET facility in Texas opens and the State Commission for the Blind is appointed the licensing agency 1979: The 66 th Legislature authorizes BET facilities to operate on state properties 1999: BET Trust Fund created Legal Citation Human Resources Code, Chapter 94 TAC, Title 40, Part 2, Chapter 106, Subchapter N, §106.1901 -106.1935 19

20 Business Enterprises of Texas Program 20 Business Enterprises of Texas Estimated FY 2014 GR – R Estimated FY 2014 All Funds Budgeted FY 2015 GR – R Budgeted FY 2015 All Funds FY 2014-15 GR - R FY 2014-15 All Funds $ 678,644$ 2,466,839$ 675,867$ 2,463,605$ 1,354,511$ 4,930,444 Business Enterprises of Texas – Trust Fund Estimated FY 2014 GR – R Estimated FY 2014 All Funds Budgeted FY 2015 GR – R Budgeted FY 2015 All Funds FY 2014-15 GR - R FY 2014-15 All Funds $ 404,212 $ 808,424 Performance Measures201320142015 Number of Individuals Employed by BET Businesses1,5591,5601,562 Average Earnings Per Business$102,008$100,000$99,000

21 Comprehensive Rehabilitation Services Program The Comprehensive Rehabilitation Services (CRS) program provides services to Texans who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI), a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), or both The goal of the program is to help Texans with a TBI or SCI to live independently in their home and community CRS consumers must have a TBI or SCI, or both, and be: At least 16 years old A U.S. citizen and Texas resident for six months Medically stable Willing to participate in services The program focuses on three primary areas that affect both function and quality of life: Mobility Self-care Communication skills In fiscal years 2013 and 2014, approximately 90 percent of consumers who exited the program met their program goals and were living in a private residence 21

22 Comprehensive Rehabilitation Services Program CRS provides time-limited services through contracts with local providers and include: In-patient Comprehensive Medical Rehabilitation - Medical experts provide consumers with therapy, medical care, and other help Outpatient Services - Therapists help consumers increase their ability to perform daily living activities through physical, occupational, speech, and/or cognitive rehabilitation Post-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury Services - These services help consumers deal with forgetfulness or difficulties in solving problems and other mental or thought issues related to their injury and are offered on a residential and non-residential basis The Comprehensive Rehabilitation Fund (CRF 107) provides approximately two- thirds of the CRS appropriation in fiscal years 2014 and 2015 and is funded by a percent of funds collected on surcharges on all misdemeanor and felony convictions According to the Texas Brain Injury Alliance approximately 440,000 Texans live with a traumatic brain injury 144,000 Texans sustain a traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury annually 5,700 Texans are permanently disabled by traumatic brain or spinal cord injuries annually 22

23 In FY 2013, DARS initiated a CRS Redesign Project to perform a program review and implement changes in CRS The CRS Redesign Project was broken into two phases Phase 1 of the project has been completed and included: Developing a predictive model for budgeting and planning purposes Identifying additional data needs and modifying systems to collect new data Developing weekly and monthly CRS reports to report encumbrance and payment activity Developing a tracking and monitoring tool which incorporates and compares projected revenues, encumbrances, and expenditures to actual revenues, encumbrances and expenditures Developing a monthly budget review process for central office and regional management 23 Comprehensive Rehabilitation Services Program

24 Phase II of the project began in May 2014 and includes: Determining the core service array for post-acute brain injury (PABI) services Developing a rate setting methodology for fiscal year 2016 based on research results Procuring PABI contracts for FY 2016 using the new rate methodology Developing a utilization review process – projected to be implemented for fiscal year 2017 In Phase II, DARS is researching best practices for serving consumers who have traumatic brain and/or spinal cord injuries to assess: Program outcomes Array of services to be offered Customer base Program priorities CRS Program service delivery system Rate setting methodology This research includes: The structure of similar programs in other states and best practice Recommendations for restructuring the CRS program in light of research findings Possible impacts of the Affordable Care Act 24 Comprehensive Rehabilitation Services Program

25 History 1991: The 72 nd Legislature established the comprehensive rehabilitation fund and the Comprehensive Rehabilitation Services program begins serving persons with traumatic brain injury 1997: The 75 th Legislature established that the source of the comprehensive rehabilitation fund would be surcharges on all misdemeanor and felony convictions and established that the Comprehensive Rehabilitation Fund 107 will receive 12.37 percent of funds collected 2003: The 78 th Legislature increased the surcharge and the percent of the collections that go into fund 107 was decreased to 5.3218 percent (revenue neutral) 2011: The 82 nd Legislature increased the percent of collections that go into fund 107 to 9.8218 percent generating additional revenue Legal Citation Human Resources Code, Chapter 111, Sec. 111.052 and 111.060 TAC, Part 2, Title 40, Chapter 107, Subchapter D 25

26 26 Comprehensive Rehabilitation Services Program Estimated FY 2014 GR – R Estimated FY 2014 All Funds Budgeted FY 2015 GR – R Budgeted FY 2015 All Funds FY 2014-15 GR - R FY 2014-15 All Funds $ 22,932,115$ 23,260,588$ 26,570,894$ 26,689,374$ 49,503,009$ 49,949,962 Performance Measures201320142015 Number of Consumers Served9089381,003 Average Monthly Cost per Consumer Receiving Services $3,740$4,232$4,228 Other Measures Average Length of Service for Consumers Who Met Their Goals and Were Discharged in Each Fiscal Year 10.8 Months13.6 Months Number of Consumers Who Met Their Goals and Who Were Living in a Private Residence at Closure 430 (91%)290 (91%) Number of Consumers Who Met Their Goals471371 Wait/Interest List Number of Consumers on Waiting List as of 8/31/140 Number of Consumers on Interest List as of 8/31/14203

27 Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Education Program The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Education Program trains public/private entities about hearing loss, effective communication, and accessibility The goal of the program is to promote access to services for people who are deaf or hard of hearing in order that they remain independent in their homes and communities The program provides: Education and training to persons who are deaf or hard of hearing, family members, service providers, businesses, educators and others Demonstrations and training of assistive technology equipment Training to interpreters to improve their skills Interpreter services for state agencies by contracting with a network of local interpreter agencies According to the US Census American Community Survey more than 990,000 Texans in fiscal year 2017 will be considered deaf or hard of hearing 27

28 The Camp SIGN program is designed to provide an environment of acceptance and encouragement for children who are deaf or hard of hearing Parents of children in Camp SIGN must pay for travel expenses to the camp and a fee based on a sliding scale Children attending Camp SIGN are typically from environments in which they are the only person who is deaf or hard of hearing Camp SIGN activities include: Archery Swimming Arts and crafts Cross fit training 28 Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Education Program

29 History 1979: The 66 th Legislature directed the Texas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing to develop and implement a statewide program of advocacy and education to ensure continuity of services to persons who are deaf, deaf-blind, or hard of hearing 1982: Camp SIGN program began 1993: Program began contracting with state agencies to provide interpreter services Legal Citations Human Resource Code, Chapter 81, Sec. 81.006-007 Human Resource Code, Chapter 81, Sec. 81.013 Texas Government Code, Chapter 771, Sec. 771.001 29

30 30 Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Education Program Estimated FY 2014 GR – R Estimated FY 2014 All Funds Budgeted FY 2015 GR - R Budgeted FY 2015 All Funds FY 2014-15 GR - R FY 2014-15 All Funds $ 398,276$ 1,332,071$ 326,731$ 1,202,982$ 725,007$ 2,535,053 Performance Measures201320142015 Number of Consumers Educated and Interpreters Trained 1,3382,6352,375 Average Cost per Consumer Educated or Interpreter Trained $296$201$202 Other Measures Number of Children Attending Camp SIGN6062 Total Amount of Collections from Fee Charged for Trainings $14,894$18,251

31 Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Interpreter Certification Program The DARS interpreter certification program, administrated by the Board for Evaluation of Interpreters (BEI), tests and evaluates sign language and oral interpreter candidates to determine their skill level and award certification Interpreter certification is not required to provide interpreter services for the deaf An advisory board for the BEI assists the agency in administering the program The goal of the BEI program is to: Improve the quality of interpreter services for Texans who are deaf, hard of hearing or who are hearing Increase the number of qualified interpreters in Texas Encourage the assignment of appropriately qualified interpreters for the demands of each interpreting assignment Provide a means of quality control over interpreter services provided in Texas Protect the interests of consumers of interpreter services in Texas 31

32 To be eligible to take the test to become certified, candidates must: Be 18 years of age or older Have a high school diploma or its equivalent Not have a criminal conviction that would qualify as grounds for denial, probation, suspension, or revocation of a BEI certificate Have earned at least 30 credit hours from an accredited college or university, with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher The BEI program maintains a registry of certified interpreters by skill level and specialty The Americans with Disabilities Act requires that “qualified” interpreters are utilized as a reasonable accommodation 32 Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Interpreter Certification Program

33 History 1979: The 66 th Legislature established the Board of Evaluation of Interpreters 1999: The 76 th Legislature authorized the development of a certification for trilingual interpreters 2001: The 77 th Legislature authorized a court interpreter certification program 2005: The 79 th Legislature updated statutory language for court interpreters to require only certified individuals to interpret in a legal setting Legal Citations Human Resource Code, Chapter 81, Sec. 81.007 Government Code, Chapter 57 33

34 34 Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Interpreter Certification Program Estimated FY 2014 GR – R Estimated FY 2014 All Funds Budgeted FY 2015 GR - R Budgeted FY 2015 All Funds FY 2014-15 GR - R FY 2014-15 All Funds $ 273,318$ 356,454$ 395,260$ 621,206$ 668,578$ 977,660 Performance Measures201320142015 Number of Interpreter Certificates Issued1,7311,749 Number of Individuals Tested480300 Average Cost per Interpreter Certificate Issued$137$204$355 Other Measures Number of Certified Interpreters1,5631,557 Number of Certified Court Interpreters138 Total Amount of Collections from Fees Charged for the Interpreter Certification Program $148,965$161,900

35 Early Childhood Intervention Respite Program Early Childhood Intervention (ECI) provides supports and services to families with children birth to 36 months with developmental delays or disabilities The goal of the ECI respite program is to provide a brief period of rest and recovery from the demands of caring for an infant or toddler with complex needs Respite services are defined in rule as the care of an ECI enrolled child by a relative or substitute caregiver on a short-term or intermittent basis to provide the child's parent with a break from caring for his or her child and do not include the routine care of a child for the purposes of allowing a parent to attend work or school ECI families are considered for respite services based on the contractor’s prioritization processes and available funding 35

36 Early Childhood Intervention Respite Program History 1999: The 76 th Legislature appropriated $1 million for the biennium for the purpose of providing respite care for families 2001: Funding was reduced by $.2 million Legal Citations Human Resources Code, Chapter 73, Sec. 73.005 and Sec. 73.008 TAC Title 40, Part 2, Chapter 108, Subchapter K, §108.1108 36

37 37 Early Childhood Intervention Respite Program Estimated FY 2014 GR – R Estimated FY 2014 All Funds Budgeted FY 2015 GR - R Budgeted FY 2015 All Funds FY 2014-15 GR - R FY 2014-15 All Funds $ 400,000 $ 800,000 Performance Measures201320142015 Average Monthly Number of Children Receiving Respite 234250


Download ppt "House Appropriations Subcommittee on Article II October 6, 2014 Veronda L. Durden, Commissioner Strategic Fiscal Review."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google