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School Discipline & Classroom Management: Role of School Leadership George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Center for Behavioral Education & Research University.

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Presentation on theme: "School Discipline & Classroom Management: Role of School Leadership George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Center for Behavioral Education & Research University."— Presentation transcript:

1 School Discipline & Classroom Management: Role of School Leadership George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Center for Behavioral Education & Research University of Connecticut May

2 PURPOSE Discuss importance of school administrators' roles & activities in accurate, durable, & effective implementation & support of evidence-based school discipline & behavior & classroom management practices. Administrator in SWPBS context Key features & actions Data & examples “What have we learned about effective SWPBS leaders?

3 Predictable work environments are places where employees (Buckingham & Coffman 2002, Gallup) 1. Know what is expected 2. Have materials & equipment to do job correctly 3. Receive recognition each week for good work. 4. Have supervisor who cares, & pays attention 5. Receive encouragement to contribute & improve 6. Can identify person at work who is “best friend.” 7. Feel mission of organization makes them feel like their jobs are important 8. See people around them committed to doing good job 9. Feel like they are learning new things (getting better) 10. Have opportunity to do their job well. 1 million workers, 80,000 managers, 400 companies

4 Predictable work environments are places where educators, students, family members, etc…. 1. Know what is expected 2. Have curriculum & instruction to do job correctly 3. Receive recognition for demonstrating expectations. 4. Have teacher/parent/principal who cares, & pays attention 5. Receive encouragement to contribute & improve 6. Can identify someone who they can relate to.” 7. Feel mission of classroom/school makes them feel like their efforts are important 8. See students/teachers/principals around them committed to doing good job 9. Feel like they are learning new things (getting better) 10. Have opportunity to do their learning/teaching well. 1 million workers, 80,000 managers, 400 companies

5 Effective SWPBS Leaders….. Can articulate rationale for formal & overt preventive approach Have accurate & fluent content knowledge Have accurate & efficient process fluency Model, act, engage, collaborate effective practices Invest in evidence-based practices Acknowledge staff, student, & family behavior on frequent, continuous, regular basis Make decisions based on data from student performance & implementation fidelity Focus on doing a few number of high priority initiatives well Invest in establishing local expert capacity Base decisions on implementation science

6

7 Guskey, 1986, p. 59

8 PREVENTION SCIENCE LITERATURE Surgeon General’s Report on Youth Violence (2001) Coordinated Social Emotional & Learning (Greenberg et al., 2003) Center for Study & Prevention of Violence (2006) White House Conference on School Violence (2006)

9 SWPBS Logic! Successful individual student behavior support is linked to host environments or school climates that are effective, efficient, relevant, durable, salable, & logical for all students (Zins & Ponti, 1990)

10 Host Environment Features

11 SWPBS is

12 Teaching Academics & Behaviors DEFINE Simply DEFINE Simply MODEL PRACTICE In Setting PRACTICE In Setting ADJUST for Efficiency ADJUST for Efficiency MONITOR & ACKNOWLEDGE Continuously MONITOR & ACKNOWLEDGE Continuously

13 SYSTEMS PRACTICES DATA Supporting Staff Behavior Supporting Student Behavior OUTCOMES Supporting Social Competence & Academic Achievement Supporting Decision Making Integrated Elements

14 Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior ~80% of Students ~15% ~5% CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL & POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT ALL SOME FEW

15 RtI

16 Responsiveness to Intervention

17 1-5% 5-10% 80-90% Intensive, Individual Interventions Individual Students Assessment-based High Intensity Intensive, Individual Interventions Individual Students Assessment-based Intense, durable procedures Targeted Group Interventions Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response Targeted Group Interventions Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response Universal Interventions All students Preventive, proactive Universal Interventions All settings, all students Preventive, proactive Responsiveness to Intervention Academic SystemsBehavioral Systems Circa 1996

18 All Some Few RTI Continuum of Support for ALL Dec 7, 2007

19 Continuum of Support for ALL Dec 7, 2007 Science Soc Studies Reading Math Soc skills Basketball Spanish Label behavior…not people

20 Continuum of Support for ALL Dec 7, 2007 Prob Sol. Coop play Adult rel. Anger man. Attend. Peer interac Ind. play Label behavior…not people

21 RTI Integrated Continuum Mar Academic Continuum Behavior Continuum

22 ~80% of Students ~5% ESTABLISHING CONTINUUM of SWPBS SECONDARY PREVENTION Check in/out Targeted social skills instruction Peer-based supports Social skills club TERTIARY PREVENTION Function-based support Wraparound Person-centered planning PRIMARY PREVENTION Teach SW expectations Proactive SW discipline Positive reinforcement Effective instruction Parent engagement SECONDARY PREVENTION TERTIARY PREVENTION PRIMARY PREVENTION ~15%

23 Classroom SWPBS Practices Non-classroom Family Student School-wide Smallest # Evidence-based Biggest, durable effect

24 Horner, R. H., Sugai, G., & Anderson, C. M. (in press). Examining the evidence base for school-wide positive behavior support. Focus on Exceptionality. “Is SWPBS evidence- based practice?”

25 SCHOOL-WIDE 1.Leadership team 2.Behavior purpose statement 3.Set of positive expectations & behaviors 4.Procedures for teaching SW & classroom-wide expected behavior 5.Continuum of procedures for encouraging expected behavior 6.Continuum of procedures for discouraging rule violations 7.Procedures for on-going data-based monitoring & evaluation EVIDENCE- BASED INTERVENTION PRACTICES CLASSROOM 1.All school-wide 2.Maximum structure & predictability in routines & environment 3.Positively stated expectations posted, taught, reviewed, prompted, & supervised. 4.Maximum engagement through high rates of opportunities to respond, delivery of evidence- based instructional curriculum & practices 5.Continuum of strategies to acknowledge displays of appropriate behavior. 6.Continuum of strategies for responding to inappropriate behavior. INDIVIDUAL STUDENT 1.Behavioral competence at school & district levels 2.Function-based behavior support planning 3.Team- & data-based decision making 4.Comprehensive person-centered planning & wraparound processes 5.Targeted social skills & self-management instruction 6. Individualized instructional & curricular accommodations NONCLASSROOM 1.Positive expectations & routines taught & encouraged 2.Active supervision by all staff (Scan, move, interact) 3.Precorrections & reminders 4.Positive reinforcement FAMILY ENGAGEMENT 1.Continuum of positive behavior support for all families 2.Frequent, regular positive contacts, communications, & acknowledgements 3.Formal & active participation & involvement as equal partner 4.Access to system of integrated school & community resources

26 Teacher__________________________ Rater_______________________ Date___________ Instructional Activity Time Start_______ Time End________ Tally each Positive Student Contacts Total #Tally each Negative Student Contacts Total # Ratio of Positives to Negatives: _____ to 1 Classroom Management: Self-Assessment

27 Classroom Management Practice Rating 1. I have arranged my classroom to minimize crowding and distraction Yes No 2. I have maximized structure and predictability in my classroom (e.g., explicit classroom routines, specific directions, etc.). Yes No 3. I have posted, taught, reviewed, and reinforced 3-5 positively stated expectations (or rules). Yes No 4. I provided more frequent acknowledgement for appropriate behaviors than inappropriate behaviors (See top of page). Yes No 5. I provided each student with multiple opportunities to respond and participate during instruction. Yes No 6. My instruction actively engaged students in observable ways (e.g., writing, verbalizing) Yes No 7. I actively supervised my classroom (e.g., moving, scanning) during instruction. Yes No 8. I ignored or provided quick, direct, explicit reprimands/redirections in response to inappropriate behavior. Yes No 9. I have multiple strategies/systems in place to acknowledge appropriate behavior (e.g., class point systems, praise, etc.). Yes No 10. In general, I have provided specific feedback in response to social and academic behavior errors and correct responses. Yes No Overall classroom management score: 10-8 “yes” = “Super” 7-5 “yes” = “So-So” < 5 “yes” = “Improvement Needed” # Yes___

28 Name______________________________Date_____________ Setting □ Hallway □ Entrance □ Cafeteria □ Playground □ Other_______________ Time Start_________ Time End _________ Tally each Positive Student ContactsTotal # Ratio of Positives to Negatives: _____: 1 Tally each Negative Student ContactsTotal # Non-Classroom Management: Self-Assessment

29 1.Did I have at least 4 positive for 1 negative student contacts? Yes No 2. Did I move throughout the area I was supervising? Yes No 3. Did I frequently scan the area I was supervising? Yes No 4. Did I positively interact with most of the students in the area? Yes No 5. Did I handle most minor rule violations quickly and quietly? Yes No 6. Did I follow school procedures for handling major rule violations? Yes No 7. Do I know our school-wide expectations (positively stated rules)? Yes No 8. Did I positively acknowledge at least 5 different students for displaying our school-wide expectations? Yes No Overall active supervision score: 7-8 “yes” = “Super Supervision” 5-6 “yes” = “So-So Supervision” <5 “yes” = “Improvement Needed” # Yes______

30 Agreements Team Data-based Action Plan ImplementationEvaluation GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: “Getting Started”

31 Dean Fixsen Karen Blase UNC

32 Effective Implementation Science (SISEP) Implementation Stages Implementation Drivers PEP –PIP Loops Plan-Do-Study-Act Cycle

33 “Scale-worthy” Evidence-based Practice Horner & OR 2009

34 SWPBS Implementation Blueprint

35 Initiative, Project, Committee PurposeOutcomeTarget Group Staff Involved SIP/SID/e tc Attendance Committee Character Education Safety Committee School Spirit Committee Discipline Committee DARE Committee EBS Work Group Working Smarter

36 Initiative, Committee PurposeOutcomeTarget Group Staff Involved SIP/SID Attendance Committee Increase attendance Increase % of students attending daily All studentsEric, Ellen, Marlee Goal #2 Character Education Improve character All studentsMarlee, J.S., Ellen Goal #3 Safety Committee Improve safetyPredictable response to threat/crisis Dangerous students Has not metGoal #3 School Spirit Committee Enhance school spirit Improve moraleAll studentsHas not met Discipline Committee Improve behaviorDecrease office referrals Bullies, antisocial students, repeat offenders Ellen, Eric, Marlee, Otis Goal #3 DARE Committee Prevent drug useHigh/at-risk drug users Don EBS Work GroupImplement 3-tier model Decrease office referrals, increase attendance, enhance academic engagement, improve grades All studentsEric, Ellen, Marlee, Otis, Emma Goal #2 Goal #3 Sample Teaming Matrix Are outcomes measurable?

37 Development & Sustainability

38 4 Main Data Concerns

39

40 Effective Social & Academic School Culture Common Vision/Values Common Language Common Experience Kids Benefit Effective Practice

41 pbis.org swis.org cber.org


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