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The Impact of Wisconsin 4-H Youth Development Youth Emphasis January 24, 2012 4-H Youth Leadership Skills Community Confidence 4-H Youth Leadership.

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Presentation on theme: "The Impact of Wisconsin 4-H Youth Development Youth Emphasis January 24, 2012 4-H Youth Leadership Skills Community Confidence 4-H Youth Leadership."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Impact of Wisconsin 4-H Youth Development Youth Emphasis January 24, H Youth Leadership Skills Community Confidence 4-H Youth Leadership

2 Team Evaluation Leadership Team Ellen Andrews, Matthew Calvert, Heidi Dusek, Sara Gronski, Debra Ivey, Annie Lisowski, Betsy Olson, Sarah Tarjeson, Ellen Taylor-Powell, Shep Zeldin UW-River Falls Survey Research Center Shelly Hadley, David Trechter Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis Team Ellen Andrews, Matthew Calvert, Heidi Dusek, Barbara Escobar, Sara Gronski, Debra Ivey, Annie Lisowski, Linda Lueder, Kandi O'Neil, Betsy Olson, Denise Retzleff Report Preparation Jackie Askins, Matthew Calvert, Ellen Taylor-Powell

3 Wisconsin 4-H Youth Leadership Survey Survey sampled 268 youth grades 6 through college freshmen survey was distributed by UW-RF Survey Research Center via to 1,576 randomly selected youth Drawn from 12,942 4-H members statewide + representation of other leadership programs Follow up focus groups in seven counties.

4 Focus Groups # counties # participants 4-H Ambassador Groups345 4-H Project Committees & Other County Groups 29 Teen Courts217 After-School Program Leadership120 Community Coalitions112

5 Demographics AgeCount Sample2684%19%17%13%12%10%14%9%1% 4-H Statewide12,9425%17% 16%14%13%11%7%0% Ethnic BackgroundCount Asian Amer Black or Afr Amer White or Cauc Hispa. or Latino Native Amer/ Alaskan Native Native Hawaiian/ Pacific Islander Two or More RacesOther Sample2681%0%99%0% 4-H Statewide12,9421%0%98%0%1%0%1%0% GenderCountMaleFemale Sample26834%66% 4-H Statewide12,94236%64%

6 4-H Leadership Opportunities Intentional youth leadership opportunities % who have participated Length of participation Less than 1 Year 1 – 2 Years3 or More Years 4-H Club Officer 63%7%23%33% Specific Leadership Training Opportunities 37%8%17%13% 4-H County Committee 35%9%11%15% Leader/Organizer of Afterschool Programs 32%10%12%9% 4-H Teen Leadership Group 25%6%8%12% 4-H Camp Counselor 15%2%8%5% 4-H State Team 12%3%5%4% Community Coalition Member 7%3% 1% Teen Court Panelist 4%0%2%1% Local Government Representative 6%3%2%1%

7 4-Hers’ Number of Activities How many of the 10 leadership activities have 4-Hers participated in? Number of respondents None or more44

8 Multi-year participation To what extent have you participated in the following 4-H or UW- Extension youth leadership opportunities or programs? % who have participated in this Length of participation Less than 1 Year1 – 2 Years3 or More Years 4-H Club Officer63%7%23%33% Specific Leadership Training Opportunities 37%8%17%13% 4-H County Committee35%9%11%15% Leader/Organizer of Afterschool or other Out- of-School Time Programs 32%10%12%9% 4-H Teen Leadership Group 25%6%8%12% 4-H Camp Counselor15%2%8%5% 4-H State Team12%3%5%4% Community Coalition Mbr. or Mbr. of Youth Board of a Comm. Coalition 7%3% 1% Teen Court Panelist4%0%2%1% Local Government Representative 6%3%2%1%

9 Varied Leadership Activities Number of leadership activities or programs in which respondents reported participating: Number of respondents None or more44

10 4-H Leadership and Membership: What’s the Difference? Those in intentional leadership activities are more likely to: Work as a group or team Work in cooperation or partnership with an adult Guide, train, or advise younger children and peers Make decisions that affect a club, group, organization, or community There is less difference between those in leadership activities and all 4- Hers in: Contact and interact with community leaders Plan and/or act to change something in the community or within a program Learn about and/or practice mediation and conflict resolution Learn and practice public speaking

11 Leadership Development Constructs Leadership may be defined as the ability to influence and support others in a positive manner for a common goal. Leadership is a set of skills and attitudes that can be learned and developed to influence the action of others. --Lisa Lauxman, National 4-H Program Leader Identity Connections Skills

12 Skills: What Employers Want High School Graduates Rank Applied Skill 1 Professionalism/Work Ethic % 2 Teamwork/Collaboration Oral Communications Ethics/Social Responsibility Critical Thinking/ Problem Solving Information Technology Application Written Communications Diversity Lifelong Learning/ Self Direction Creativity/Innovation Leadership Four-Year College Graduates Rank Applied Skill 1 Oral Communications % 2Teamwork/Collaboration Professionalism/Work Ethic Written Communications Critical Thinking/ Problem Solving Ethics/Social Responsibility Leadership Information Technology Application Creativity/Innovation Lifelong Learning/ Self Direction Diversity

13 Leadership Skills How much do you feel your participation in 4-H or UW- Extension youth opportunities or programs has contributed to your ability to…? Count A Great Deal/To a Great Extent + Quite a Bit/Somewhat Slightly/Very Little + Did Not Contribute/ Not at AllDon’t Know Teamwork Work cooperatively and collaboratively with others 25874%24%2% AVG64%33%3% Inclusiveness/Multicultural Treat people who are different from yourself with respect 25872%25%3% AVG63%34%2% Communication Listen carefully to what others say 25871%27%1% AVG58%38%3% Planning and Organizing Plan and organize group activities 25457%40%3% AVG56%39%5% Decision Making/Problem Solving Think critically about the advantages and disadvantages of decisions 25856%41%4% AVG48%47%5%

14 Leadership Skills in Practice A youth member of the Fond du Lac County Horse Project Board talked about how her experiences helped her in her work: “I draw blood for my job. People are sick and not happy about being there. It helps me to read body language and do small talk and relate to the patient. This helps people not to stress out. 4-H experiences make things like this easier in the real world.” Washington County Ambassadors built experience in working across individual and cultural differences—starting with different ideas and keeping the focus on helping others learn and have fun. One member said, “One great thing about 4-H is understanding that we are all different and coming to an understanding. Using patience and deciding what works best.”

15 Leadership Confidence How much do you feel your participation in 4-H or UW-Extension youth opportunities or programs has contributed to your ability to…? A Great Deal/To a Great Extent + Quite a Bit/Somewhat Slightly/Very Little + Did Not Contribute/ Not at AllDon’t Know Leadership Identity Accept responsibility for doing a job 74%24%2% Improve your leadership skills 66%30%4% Recognize yourself as a leader 60%34%6% Understand your own leadership strengths 67%27%5% 67%29%4% Self-Efficacy Help a team/group reach its goals 68%29%3% Motivate and inspire others 64%29%6% Stand up/Speak out for what is right 54%43%2% 65%31%3%

16 Leadership Confidence in Practice Buffalo County youth felt a responsibility to step into leadership roles: “When I know no one else is willing to do it helps me make the decision to do it and also knowing that there is impact on others.” Washington County Ambassadors take ownership of the success and failure of club and county 4-H activities. One ambassador contrasted 4-H with some other experiences: “The adults always try to take control and pipe in. In 4-H – the adults let the youth run the meetings. Adults step back and let the youth take the lead.”

17 Community Connections How much do you feel your participation in 4-H or UW- Extension youth opportunities or programs has …? A Great Deal/To a Great Extent + Quite a Bit/Somewhat Slightly/Very Little + Did Not Contribute/ Not at AllDon’t Know Community Connections Made you feel more connected to your community 83%13%3% Made you feel more important to your community 77%19%3% Provided you with a better understanding of community issues 69%25%6% 76%19%4% Motivation/Ability for Community Action Motivated you to work with others to make things better in your community 79%17%4% Provided you with a better understanding of community issues 69%25%6% Made you feel a responsibility to work on community issues 69%23%7% 72%22%6%

18 Community Connections in Practice Racine County have opportunities to represent the organization in many community venues and build their own personal networks through activities that take them to new places. One youth noted, “You can talk to new people all the time, you get to see things you wouldn’t normally be able to.” Iowa County Ambassadors perceived the importance of being an active contributor: “You have to be involved to get anything out of it;” and “We get things from the community and we do things for the community.”

19 Program Practices: Teen Court/Partnership Council Opportunities to make a meaningful contribution towards addressing authentic needs and issues Youth feel valued and have a real voice in programming and partnership Young people are engaged in significant roles that aid them in practicing communication, teamwork, and decision-making skills

20 Program Practices: Youth-Teaching Youth --Boomerang! Invitation is the First Step Recognized as a Leader Opportunities for Training & Modeling Structure is Responsive to Developmental Interests

21 In your experience working with “Youth-Teaching Youth” programs, have any of these themes been strong factors of program success? Invitation is the First Step Recognized as a Leader Opportunities for Training & Modeling Structure is Responsive to Developmental Interests

22 Program Practices: Ambassador/Council Youth/Adult Partnership – Ambassadors take ownership of the success and failure of club and county 4-H activities. Youth realize that if they do not step up to make something happen, it would not happen. Expectations and Modeling – “4-H is run by the youth, other groups at school you have teach and advisors who usually have all the power and control but in 4-H the expectations are higher for us, we run the meetings we do the work we have the power.” Teamwork – They have learned the value of shared leadership rather than having only a few people do all the work.

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