Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

NCAA Division III Bylaw 12/16 Advanced Application.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "NCAA Division III Bylaw 12/16 Advanced Application."— Presentation transcript:

1 NCAA Division III Bylaw 12/16 Advanced Application

2 Agenda Promotional Activities –Institutional, Charitable, Educational or Nonprofit Promotions (Bylaw ). –Modeling and Other Nonathletically Related Promotional Activities (Bylaw ). Media Activities (Bylaw ). Expenses Provided By the Institution for Practice and Competition (Bylaw 16.8) Bylaw 12/16 Update –Recent Legislative Changes

3 Session Outcomes Understand NCAA Division III Bylaw 12 and 16 legislation. Identify areas of concern and potential problems within Bylaws 12 and 16. Apply relevant legislation and interpretations using case studies. Share thoughts and best practices for working through interpretive issues relevant to Bylaws 12 and 16.

4 Session Approach Follow the women’s basketball team through an academic year and address more complex Bylaw 12/16 questions. Present case studies in the manner in which questions are often posed to compliance administrators on campus. Identify specific legislation and interpretations that are relevant to the question at hand. Using all interpretive resources, work together to determine the appropriate response to the given question.

5 Case Study No. 1 - September Your women’s basketball coach plans to conduct a foreign tour this coming summer. Before she can make final arrangements for the foreign tour, the team needs to raise funds to pay for the trip. She wants to work with Westbay, a third party company who will create institutional apparel.

6 Case Study No. 1 - September Westbay will produce mock-ups for Compliance University (CU) apparel. Westbay will produce a catalog containing the CU apparel. Student-athletes at CU will use the catalog to promote the sale of the CU apparel. Can student-athletes promote the sale of Westbay institutional apparel? What are the concerns?

7 Case Study No. 1 - September Whenever you hear “promotion,” some questions to ask yourself: –Are student-athletes involved? Are student-athletes using their name or likeness as part of the promotion? –Is this promoting a commercial product or service? Or is this an institutional fundraiser?

8 Case Study No. 1 - September Are student-athletes involved? –Yes. Are student-athletes using their name or likeness as part of the promotion? –Yes – by directly soliciting apparel sales, student-athletes use their name/likeness to promote the fundraising activity. Based on the responses to the first two questions, we know that this will have to fit somewhere in Bylaw

9 Case Study No. 1 - September How to determine whether this scenario is a promotion of a commercial product or service or an institutional fundraiser. Some additional questions to ask: –Institutional control of funds? Who are the consumers making the checks out to? –Are student-athletes exclusively promoting the sale of the institutional apparel? Or are they generally promoting Westbay?

10 Case Study No. 1 - September If… –Consumers submit payment directly to Westbay**; –Student-athletes are involved in promoting Westbay, generally; or –Any of the provisions of Bylaw are not met Then… –It would not be permissible for CU student-athletes to be involved in using Westbay for their institutional fundraiser.

11 Case Study No. 1 - September If… –Consumers submit payment to CU and CU then places an order with Westbay; –Student-athletes are involved only in promoting the sale of the institutional apparel and are not promoting Westbay, generally; and –All other provisions of Bylaw are met. Then… –It would be permissible for CU to use Westbay for their institutional fundraiser.

12 Bylaw

13 Case Study No. 2 – December Your women’s basketball team is 5-1 and about to begin conference play. Your women’s basketball coach sends you a link to a website that one of her players, Tina Bopper, has been distributing around campus. The website advertises the sale of an autobiographical documentary produced by a company that highlights high achievers in multiple areas. It is clear, from the information on the website, that the documentary focuses on Tina’s student-athlete, academic and artistic successes and Tina has been involved in promoting the sale of this documentary.

14 Case Study No. 2 – December Is there an issue with Tina promoting the sale of the documentary? Questions to consider: –Is Tina identified by name or face in her promotion of the documentary? Is Tina’s real name used in the documentary or in her promotions of the documentary? –Is Tina’s athletics ability referenced in the documentary or in her promotion of the documentary? –Is Tina’s involvement in intercollegiate athletics referenced?

15 Case Study No. 2 – December Bylaw (Modeling and Other Nonathletically Related Promotional Activities). –Would allow Tina to be involved in promoting the sale of the documentary if… Her athletics ability was not a component of the documentary; No reference was made to her involvement in intercollegiate athletics; and She is paid at a rate commensurate with her skills and experience and her payment is not based in any way upon her athletics ability or reputation.

16 Case Study No. 2 – December If Tina’s athletics ability/participation is referenced in the documentary, Tina could not be involved in promoting the documentary. Why?

17 Bylaw It is permissible for an individual to accept remuneration for or permit the use of his or her name or picture to advertise or promote the sale or use of a commercial product or service without jeopardizing his or her eligibility to participate in intercollegiate athletics only if all of the following conditions apply: – The individual became involved in such activities for reasons independent of athletics ability; – No reference is made in these activities to the individual's involvement in intercollegiate athletics; and – The individual's remuneration under such circumstances is at a rate commensurate with the individual's skills and experience as a model or performer and is not based in any way upon the individual's athletics ability or reputation.

18 Case Study No. 2 – December If you determine that Tina’s involvement in the production and promotion of the documentary violates Bylaw … –Determine whether Tina has participated in any women’s basketball games after the first violation occurred. –File a secondary violation using RSRO. –Seek student-athlete reinstatement.

19 Case Study No. 3 - January Because of Tina Bopper’s violation and subsequent student- athlete reinstatement in December, your women’s basketball coach is very concerned about student-athletes appearing in any video. The women’s basketball coach comes to you to ask if another women’s basketball player, Bess Twishes, can appear on the Ellen Show in recognition of her work with a youth basketball team.

20 Case Study No. 3 - January Ellen wants to have Bess picked up by limo and transported to the set of her show. The Ellen Show will also provide Bess with meals and lodging associated with her appearance on the show. Can Bess appear on the show? Can Bess receive expenses related to her appearance on the show?

21 Case Study No. 3 - January Additional questions to ask: –Will Bess be paid in addition to the receipt of actual and necessary expenses? Yes. –How much will Bess be paid? Bess will be paid the same amount that all guests of the Ellen Show are typically paid. –Will The Ellen Show use Bess’ name for advertisement or promotion? Yes. The Ellen Show will use Bess’ name and likeness to advertise her participation on the show but will not use her status as a student-athlete in the advertisement.

22 Case Study No. 3 - January Bylaw would allow Bess to be a guest on The Ellen Show, even if her participation is related to athletics, provided: –Bess does not receive benefits in excess of actual and necessary expenses plus compensation commensurate with the going rate for similar services; and –Bess’ status as a student-athlete is not used for promotional purposes.

23 Tying it Together Your women’s basketball coach is having a hard time distinguishing between Tina’s situation in December and Bess’ situation in January. Why are they different?

24 Tying it Together Bylaw only deals with the permissibility of being a participant in a media activity. In order for a student-athlete to be involved in promoting a commercial product or service, the promotion must meet Bylaw –Tina was using her name and likeness to directly promote the sale of a commercial product. So she had to meet Bylaw Because her athletics participation was involved and she identified herself as a student-athlete, she did not meet Bylaw –Bess was using her name or likeness as a participant in a media activity with no promotional activity. So she only had to meet Bylaw Are there potential changes to Tina’s situation that would make interpretively permissible?

25 Case Study No. 4 – March March Madness is finally here! Your women’s basketball team has qualified for the conference championship in Wilmington. One of the women’s basketball student-athletes, Della Ware, is from Wilmington and her parents have plenty of room to house the team during the tournament.

26 Case Study No. 4 – March Your women’s basketball coach would like to have the team stay at Della’s parent’s house during the tournament in order to save money. Della’s parents would also like to provide dinner for the team during the first night of their stay. Is this permissible?

27 Case Study No. 4 – March Bylaw 16.8 generally addresses expenses that can be provided for practice and competition. Bylaw is specific in saying that the practice and competition expenses that are permitted in Bylaw 16.8 specifically deal with expenses that can be provided by the institution. Bylaw refers to Bylaw for expenses that can be provided by individuals or organizations other than the institution. Bylaw does not allow a parent or a booster to provide lodging in conjunction with practice or competition. Is there a way we can get there?

28 Case Study No. 4 – March Athletics departments can accept donations. Athletics departments are advised to have and follow an institutional policy for tracking such donations. Della’s parents could donate the use of their home to CU. –NOTE: Della’s parents would become “representatives of athletics interests” (Bylaw ). Bylaw allows an institution to provide actual and necessary expenses to eligible student-athletes to represent the institution in intercollegiate competition. Would they have to donate the meal too?

29 Case Study No. 4 – March Bylaw allows CU’s women’s basketball team to receive an occasional meal from Della’s parents at any location.

30 Bylaw 12/16 Legislative Changes NCAA Proposal No. NC –Bylaw previously allowed for certain expenses to be provided from the USOC or a national governing body. –This proposal allows governmental entities to provide those same expenses. Proposal No. NC –Bylaw previously allowed fundraisers for SAs and their families in extreme circumstances. Required that the funds be disbursed through or paid directly to a third party. –This proposal allows the funds to be given directly to beneficiaries, with receipt kept on file by the institution.

31 Bylaw 12/16 Legislative Changes Proposal No. NC –Bylaw previously allowed an institution to pay for a maximum of two national team tryout competition events. –This proposal allows an institution to pay for an unlimited number of national team tryout competition events.

32 Bylaw 12/16 Legislative Changes Proposal No. NC –Bylaw 16.7 was previously prescriptive on when an institution could permissibly provide team entertainment. –This proposal deregulates much of Bylaw 16.7 to allow an institution flexibility to provide reasonable entertainment in conjunction with practice or competition. –The restrictions relevant to practice sites on road trips remain.

33 Questions?


Download ppt "NCAA Division III Bylaw 12/16 Advanced Application."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google