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Welcome! This web conference will begin at 12 noon Eastern time. If you have not already done so, please “sync” your telephone and computer as detailed.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome! This web conference will begin at 12 noon Eastern time. If you have not already done so, please “sync” your telephone and computer as detailed."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome! This web conference will begin at 12 noon Eastern time. If you have not already done so, please “sync” your telephone and computer as detailed in the “voice connection” tab at the bottom right-hand corner of your screen.

2 Low-Wage Workers in the Coming Economy Speakers  Stacy Blake-Beard, Associate Professor of Management, Simmons College School of Management  Ellen Ernst Kossek, University Distinguished Professor, Michigan State University School of Labor & Industrial Relations  Mark Popovich, Senior Program Officer, The Hitachi Foundation Moderator  Maureen Scully, Assistant Professor of Management, UMASS-Boston

3 Embargoed - Do NOT Release without Permission of The Hitachi Foundation Employer Investment in Lower-Wage Workers: Findings from the State of Corporate Citizenship 2009 Survey Mark Popovich Senior Program Officer The Hitachi Foundation 3

4 Embargoed - Do NOT Release without Permission of The Hitachi Foundation 4 About The Hitachi Foundation - An independent nonprofit philanthropy established by Hitachi in The Foundation believes that business has an essential role to play in addressing many complex global challenges of our time - Our mission is to forge an authentic integration of business actions and societal well-being in North America - We do so by discovering and expanding business practices that measurably improve the lives of economically distressed people and enhance business value

5 Embargoed - Do NOT Release without Permission of The Hitachi Foundation 5 About the Survey and Our Goals - Derived from survey research conducted every two years with the Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship - Phone survey by GlobeScan of a nationally representative sample of 756 small, medium, and large companies - Added questions on company practices and investments affecting the the training, education, and career advancement of lower income workers - Business commits over $100 billion annually to talent development. That is many times greater than public funding for workforce development - Lower-income workers are integral to many businesses. Effective development efforts can benefit both employees and the business bottom line

6 Embargoed - Do NOT Release without Permission of The Hitachi Foundation 6 Selling to

7 Embargoed - Do NOT Release without Permission of The Hitachi Foundation 36% Sharp Decline 15% Significant Increases 49% Stable

8 Embargoed - Do NOT Release without Permission of The Hitachi Foundation Percent of Companies with Layoffs by Company Size 8

9 Embargoed - Do NOT Release without Permission of The Hitachi Foundation 16% 36% 52% 9 Lower-wage workers are an integral part of the business model for more than half of all businesses

10 Embargoed - Do NOT Release without Permission of The Hitachi Foundation 10

11 Embargoed - Do NOT Release without Permission of The Hitachi Foundation 11

12 Embargoed - Do NOT Release without Permission of The Hitachi Foundation Q: Why do you support skill development for employees making less than $40,000 annually? Note: Results are from a subsample of 596 who report they support skill development for employees making less than $40k/year. Option to select two most important reasons. 12

13 Embargoed - Do NOT Release without Permission of The Hitachi Foundation Note: Subsample of 156 companies who say they do NOT support the skill development, ed, and career Adv of under $40k/yr employees. Prompted to select two most important reasons 13

14 Embargoed - Do NOT Release without Permission of The Hitachi Foundation 14 Q: To what extent has your company increased or decreased support for skill development, education, and career advancement of existing employees earning less than $40,000 annually on a five point scale where 1 =“greatly decreased,” 3 = “no change,” and 5 =“greatly increased.”

15 SIMMONS School of Management BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS Click to edit Master title style SIMMONS BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS School of Management Stacy Blake-Beard, Ph.D. Simmons College School of Management Center for Gender in Organizations Aspen Institute Webinar; November 20, 2009 Bringing Class Into the Classroom: Cases, Exercises, and Readings

16 SIMMONS School of Management Diversity means... If we were to shrink the world to a village of exactly 100 people, – Half of the world’s wealth would be held by 6 U.S. citizens. – Half of the villagers would suffer from malnutrition. – 80 people would live in sub-standard housing. – Just 30 people would be able to read. – Only one would have a college education.

17 SIMMONS School of Management Ways to Infuse Class into the Classroom Cases Exercises Readings

18 SIMMONS School of Management Cases Donna Klein at Marriott Rachel Hubka The Parable of the Sadhu

19 SIMMONS School of Management Exercises Power Simulation: Tops, Middles, Bottoms Experience of Being Other

20 SIMMONS School of Management Readings Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America by Barbara Ehrenreich Class Matters - Social Class in the United States of America series in The New York Times Where We Stand: Class Matters by bell hooks Betrayal at Berkeley: Wages and Working Conditions at CAL. by Gretchen Purser, Amy Schalet and Ofer Sharone White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack by Peggy McIntosh

21 SIMMONS School of Management

22 The Working Poor: Increasing Workplace Inclusion As a Diversity Management & Organizational Change Initiative Dr. Ellen Ernst Kossek University Distinguished Professor Michigan State University School of Labor and Industrial Relations Center for Work Family Stress Safety and Health and Aspen Institute Webinar November 20, 2009

23 © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved. 1–23 The Inclusive Workplace Values and utilizes individual and inter-group differences within its workforceValues and utilizes individual and inter-group differences within its workforce Cooperates with, and contributes to, its surrounding communityCooperates with, and contributes to, its surrounding community Alleviates the needs of disadvantaged groups in its wider environmentAlleviates the needs of disadvantaged groups in its wider environment Collaborates with individuals, groups, and organizations across national and cultural boundariesCollaborates with individuals, groups, and organizations across national and cultural boundaries From Mor Barak (2008)From Mor Barak (2008) Micro Macro

24 © 2007 Thomson/South- Western. All rights reserved.- Source Bell –24 Definitions A stereotype is a standardized oversimplified mental picture that is held in common by members of a group A prejudice is derived from the verb to ‘prejudge’ and refers to a preconceived judgment or opinion held by members of a group. Most commonly, a prejudice is perceived as an irrational attitude of hostility or indifference directed against an individual, a group, a race, or their supposed characteristics Stereotypes and Prejudice Dehumanization is a psychological mechanism in viewing members of other groups as inferior, and its behavioral manifestation is oppression.Dehumanization is a psychological mechanism in viewing members of other groups as inferior, and its behavioral manifestation is oppression.

25 1–25 Workplace Interventions to Increase Inclusion of Working Poor: Weaving into Employing Organizations: Supportive Organizational Policy and StructuresSupportive Organizational Policy and Structures Changing the Organization CultureChanging the Organization Culture Management Skills & TechniquesManagement Skills & Techniques Increasing Accountability and Measurement of the Impact of Diversity InitiativesIncreasing Accountability and Measurement of the Impact of Diversity Initiatives

26 Example: Workplace Practice, Health and Well-Being: Initial Research Findings from the Work, Family & Health Network Video: A Better Way to Work lic/default.aspx

27 The Effect of Family Supportive Supervision on Grocery Workers Dr. Ellen KossekDr. Leslie B. Hammer Michigan State UniversityPortland State University

28 Training Supervisors to Support Grocery Workers’ Family and Personal Lives TYPES OF SUPERVISORY SUPPORT FOR FAMILY ■ Emotional Support for Family ■ Practical Support with Scheduling Conflicts ■ Work-Family Role Modeling ■ Creative Work-Family Management Overview of Research ■ Source: Hammer, Kossek, & Bodner,Yragui Journal of Managemen t

29 Baseline Findings Workers supervised by family-supportive managers are more likely to experience:  Lower levels of work and family conflict  Higher job satisfaction  Lower intentions to turnover  Higher reports of mental and physical health Kossek, E. E., & Hammer, L. B. (November, 2008). Work/Life Training for Supervisors Gets Big Results. Harvard Business Review.

30 Effects of Supervisor Training Intervention: Training buffered the negative effects of family-to-work conflict on health Most beneficial for employees with high family-to-work conflict Higher job satisfaction Less likely to want to quit their job Better reports of physical health

31 Low-Wage Workers in the Coming Economy Speakers  Stacy Blake-Beard, Associate Professor of Management, Simmons College School of Management  Ellen Ernst Kossek, University Distinguished Professor, Michigan State University School of Labor & Industrial Relations  Mark Popovich, Senior Program Officer, The Hitachi Foundation Moderator  Maureen Scully, Assistant Professor of Management, UMASS- Boston


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