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Q&A  Addressing specific questions that came out of our one minute response papers.

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Presentation on theme: "Q&A  Addressing specific questions that came out of our one minute response papers."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Q&A  Addressing specific questions that came out of our one minute response papers.

3 Question  Are there other useful resources to find relevant information? Are there other useful resources to find relevant information?

4 Answer

5 Question  What kind of in-library resources are there? Are there scholarly journals kept in the library?

6 Answer  Can anyone in the class answer this?  Yes!  Weldon’s print journals are located on the ground floor in Room B and they are shelved by call number.  Browsing journals is time-consuming, so it’s best to start with a database or journal index that leads you to specific articles on your topic.

7 Question  Book sources – they have so much information it’s difficult picking out all relevant information.

8 Answer

9 Question  How do I read an article properly?

10 Answer  At First Glance – getting some context  Read through the abstract (summary) if there is one  Read the introduction paragraph  Read through the concluding paragraph  Looking a Little Deeper  As you read the whole essay, note the prominent scholars and texts mentioned  Reread the conclusion thinking about the implications of the research  Reread the Paper - As you reread each section, ask some of these critical questions:  What is the researcher studying?  What is already known about this?  How does the article fit into the context of the discipline?  Do you agree with what is being said? Does it support or contradict your thoughts?

11 Question  How do I refine the search further? – I’m having trouble finding relevant sources.  I’m having a hard time doing specific searches for my topic. Is there an easier way or do I just try as many resources as possible?

12 Answer  RE-search sometimes requires revisiting your searches and your strategies ...and sometimes you need to get a fresh pair of eyes

13 Question  Is there a way to delete a single line on L’APh without starting a whole new search?

14 Answer

15 Question  How do I find articles from L’APh at Western?

16 Answer

17 Question  Is there a way to make summaries appear in English?  How can we judge whether or not a source is useful with the small summaries / tables of contents given?

18 Answer Is this summary useful?

19 Question  How to book study rooms?

20 Answer  In Weldon, the study rooms are available on a first come, first serve basis.  The Taylor Library has study rooms that are bookable online [but we know you’d rather be in Weldon ]  day=22&month=10&year=2009 day=22&month=10&year=2009

21 Question  I’m confused about the two different formats of the catalogue search

22 Answer

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24 RefWorks Questions  Isn’t it easier to do references yourself if you have to edit it anyways? [Maybe...it depends]  Do we have to do our annotated bibliography in RefWorks?  How to edit bibliography created in RefWorks

25 Your assignment and RefWorks  Do we have to do our annotated bibliography in RefWorks?  NO, but you do have to share your citations with Walter using RefShare FOR 5 EASY MARKS!

26 RefShare with Walter

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32 Create a Bibliography

33 Bibliography in word

34 Edit as appropriate

35 Journal Citation & Annotation Nethercut, W. R. "Apuleius' Literary Art. Resonance and Depth in the Metamorphoses." Classical Journal 64.3 (1968): Print. William R. Nethercut is the author of over 20 articles in Classics journals and is a Professor of Greek and Roman Literature at the University of Texas at Austin as well as an Egyptologist. In this 1968 article, Nethercut analyzes the repetitive allusions in The Golden Ass. He discusses the recurring theme of allusion in juxtaposition to reality and how these experiences result in Apuleius' metamorphosis. In contrast to Finkelpearl's work, Nethercut concludes that allusion is the most important element in The Golden Ass and without it, metamorphosis would not have occurred.

36 Insert Annotations William R. Nethercut is the author of over 20 articles in Classics journals and is a Professor of Greek and Roman Literature at the University of Texas at Austin as well as an Egyptologist. In this 1968 article, Nethercut analyzes the repetitive allusions in The Golden Ass. He discusses the recurring theme of allusion in juxtaposition to reality and how these experiences result in Apuleius' metamorphosis. In contrast to Finkelpearl's work, Nethercut concludes that allusion is the most important element in The Golden Ass and without it, metamorphosis would not have occurred. (92 words)

37 Insert Annotations William R. Nethercut is the author of over 20 articles in Classics journals and is a Professor of Greek and Roman Literature at the University of Texas at Austin as well as an Egyptologist. In this 1968 article, Nethercut analyzes the repetitive allusions in The Golden Ass. He discusses the recurring theme of allusion in juxtaposition to reality and how these experiences result in Apuleius' metamorphosis. In contrast to Finkelpearl's work, Nethercut concludes that allusion is the most important element in The Golden Ass and without it, metamorphosis would not have occurred. (92 words)

38 Insert Annotations William R. Nethercut is the author of over 20 articles in Classics journals and is a Professor of Greek and Roman Literature at the University of Texas at Austin as well as an Egyptologist. In this 1968 article, Nethercut analyzes the repetitive allusions in The Golden Ass. He discusses the recurring theme of allusion in juxtaposition to reality and how these experiences result in Apuleius' metamorphosis. In contrast to Finkelpearl's work, Nethercut concludes that allusion is the most important element in The Golden Ass and without it, metamorphosis would not have occurred. (92 words)

39 Insert Annotations William R. Nethercut is the author of over 20 articles in Classics journals and is a Professor of Greek and Roman Literature at the University of Texas at Austin as well as an Egyptologist. In this 1968 article, Nethercut analyzes the repetitive allusions in The Golden Ass. He discusses the recurring theme of allusion in juxtaposition to reality and how these experiences result in Apuleius' metamorphosis. In contrast to Finkelpearl's work, Nethercut concludes that allusion is the most important element in The Golden Ass and without it, metamorphosis would not have occurred. (92 words)

40 Insert Annotations William R. Nethercut is the author of over 20 articles in Classics journals and is a Professor of Greek and Roman Literature at the University of Texas at Austin as well as an Egyptologist. In this 1968 article, Nethercut analyzes the repetitive allusions in The Golden Ass. He discusses the recurring theme of allusion in juxtaposition to reality and how these experiences result in Apuleius' metamorphosis. In contrast to Finkelpearl's work, Nethercut concludes that allusion is the most important element in The Golden Ass and without it, metamorphosis would not have occurred. (92 words)

41 Book Citation & Annotation  Finkelpearl, Ellen D. Metamorphosis of Language in Apuleius : A Study of Allusion in the Novel. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, Print. Ellen Finkelpearl's Metamorphosis of Language in Apuleius studies the use of literary allusion by the Roman author Apuleius. This study argues that Apuleius' repeated allusions to earlier Latin authors such as Vergil, Ovid, and Seneca represent an exploration on his part of the relationship between the novel and more established genres of the era. A new reading of Isis is offered, which emphasizes her associations with writing and matches the multiformity of the goddess with the novel's many voices. Ellen D. Finkelpearl is Associate Professor of Classics at Scripps College, Claremont, California.

42 What not to do aka Plagiarized version Ellen Finkelpearl's Metamorphosis of Language in Apuleius studies the use of literary allusion by the Roman author Apuleius. This study argues that Apuleius' repeated allusions to earlier Latin authors such as Vergil, Ovid, and Seneca represent an exploration on his part of the relationship between the novel and more established genres of the era. A new reading of Isis is offered, which emphasizes her associations with writing and matches the multiformity of the goddess with the novel's many voices. Ellen D. Finkelpearl is Associate Professor of Classics at Scripps College, Claremont, California.

43 Christy’s version Ellen Finkelpearl’s book is an examination of literary language used in Apuleius’ Metamorphosis. One chapter that focuses on the “reading of isolated allusions” is particularly interesting because it discusses the difficulties that readers and critics alike have on agreeing upon the existence of certain allusions narrated in the novel. Finkelpearl is a professor of Classics and an expert on Apuleius and has written eight articles on the topic of Metamorphosis. The essays contained in her book are well documented with scholarly citations. This book is cited in three other articles that I have looked at on this topic. The work concludes by stating that there are a variety of perspectives offered in the allusions appearing in Metamorphosis. (117words)

44 Recap  Refer to Assignment Sheet for requirements.  Create bibliography with your citations (MLA or Chicago).  Add annotations (see list of required and suggested elements).  RefShare with Walter.  Submit on time – October 30 th Class


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