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Important Notes for Sustainable Streets Power Point users: (1) Copyright permission for many of the images included in this file has been granted to Ellen.

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Presentation on theme: "Important Notes for Sustainable Streets Power Point users: (1) Copyright permission for many of the images included in this file has been granted to Ellen."— Presentation transcript:

1 Important Notes for Sustainable Streets Power Point users: (1) Copyright permission for many of the images included in this file has been granted to Ellen Greenberg for limited educational purposes only. Do not extract images and/or use them for other purposes without contacting the copyright holders and obtaining permission. Permission to cite text is granted. All text should be attributed to Ellen Greenberg unless identified as “Contributor Perspective.” (2) The Power Point notes view for many of the slides includes additional explanatory material or fully-worded text that should be used in presenting the Sustainable Streets material. (3) Please contact Ellen Greenberg at with any additions, corrections or feedback.

2 Sustainable Streets Emerging Priorities, Emerging Practices July 24, 2008 version Top photo: Ellen Greenberg Bottom photo: City of Portland 42

3 The Sustainable Streets project is sponsored by the UC Davis Sustainable Transportation Center through its Visiting Practitioner Program Top photo: Ellen Greenberg Bottom photo: City of Portland 42

4 Top photo: Ellen Greenberg Bottom photo: City of Portland 42 Sustainable Streets Project Director: Ellen Greenberg, AICP Project Researcher: Morgan Kanninen

5 Top photo: Ellen Greenberg Bottom photo: City of Portland 42 Sustainable Streets The Sustainable Streets project has benefited from contributions from many representatives of public and private organizations. We thank each of these individuals for their assistance.

6 Photo: Marcy McInelly, SERA/Urbsworks are rights of way designed and operated to create benefits relating to movement, ecology and community that together support a broad sustainability agenda embracing the three E’s of environment, ecology and economy. Sustainable Streets

7 Movement The movement of people and goods by all on-street modes and for all trip purposes and types. Sustainable streets can create settings and facilities for improved travel performance with respect to movement and ecological objectives. Photo: Ellen Greenberg

8 Movement Objectives Reliability and convenience Reduced Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) Independent mobility High level of accessibility Emergency vehicle access Features Highly connected multimodal network Supporting land use pattern with diverse activity in close proximity Compatible vehicle speeds Facilities for transit, bikes and walking

9 Ecology Sustainable streets protect and enhance natural resources and processes. Photo: Marcy McInelly, SERA/Urbsworks

10 Ecology Objectives Improved air quality Water conservation; improved water quality Enhanced ecological health and productivity Reduced urban heat island effect Efficient overall use of energy and other resources Reduced greenhouse gas emissions Features Urban forest; other vegetation Biofiltration (variety of features) Permeable paving Use of energy efficient traffic signals and lighting Preserve natural features and landscapes

11 Community (1) Contribute to social, economic, public health, cultural and aesthetic needs as well as environmental justice. (2) Support for urban development patterns that reinforce movement and ecological goals. Photo: Ellen Vanderslice, City of Portland

12 Community Objectives Placemaking: identity, distinction and beauty Support for compact and infill development Positive public health outcomes Promote sociability and community life Create value for adjoining properties Significantly reduce travel- related injuries and fatalities Features Distinctive landscape design, street furnishings, lighting etc. Comfortable pedestrian realm buffered from moving traffic Easily crossed streets Safe and secure places for transit waits and transfers Public gathering places within and linked to public right of way Right-sized roads in relation to appropriate operating speeds and pedestrian environment overall

13 From Design Features to Desired Outcomes: Catalysts and Complements Catalysts: Factors required to achieve desired outcomes Complements: Factors that increase the probability and/or intensity of desired outcome(s)

14 Design Features and Desired Outcomes: Examples: Ecology Feature Infiltrate runoff and stormwater on site Catalyst(s)Complement(s) Desired Outcomes Desired Intermediate Effect(s) Slow runoff rate; remove sediment from stormwater Reduced Pollutant load, erosion, turbulence and temperature impacts of urban runoff Biofiltration swales Pervious Paving

15 Design Features and Desired Outcomes: Examples: Movement Feature Increase travel by non- polluting modes Catalyst(s)Complement(s) Desired Outcomes Desired Intermediate Effect(s) Increase travel by less polluting modes Reduced Vehicle Miles Traveled, increased physical activity Facilities for public transit operations Facilities for non- motorized transport (walk, bike) Users making choice to bike or walk Origins and destinations easily accessed by walk, bike or transit Public Transit Service


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