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HealthCare Chaplaincy 1 Mindfulness & Motivation in Daily Life Insights and Provocations Jackson Kytle.

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Presentation on theme: "HealthCare Chaplaincy 1 Mindfulness & Motivation in Daily Life Insights and Provocations Jackson Kytle."— Presentation transcript:

1 HealthCare Chaplaincy 1 Mindfulness & Motivation in Daily Life Insights and Provocations Jackson Kytle

2 2HealthCare Chaplaincy A bit of context … Focus on psychological involvement in daily life An experience not often examined Worrying is not examining

3 3HealthCare Chaplaincy My purposes today … Focus your attention on the quality of psychological experience in human existence, especially your own Put some concepts in play that help us think about motivation and about daily life Share my insights and questions Ask us to think about how we think, how the mind processes experience

4 4HealthCare Chaplaincy This is a sampler …

5 5HealthCare Chaplaincy Swimming in the current … William James and the “stream of consciousness” Heading bobbing in the current, can we get to the bank to rest and reflect?

6 6HealthCare Chaplaincy Three Problematics in Daily Life … Self-motivationLearning Quality of lived experience, especially as shaped by self- motivation and learning

7 7HealthCare Chaplaincy INSIGHT For most people, lived experience is, well, bumpy Managing self-motivation is a daily project So is managing the monkey mind

8 8HealthCare Chaplaincy INSIGHT We cannot easily control the Fordist production systems in which we must work. We cannot easily control the Fordist production systems in which we must work. We can control the ideas we bring to making sense of lived experience. We can control the ideas we bring to making sense of lived experience.

9 9HealthCare Chaplaincy Four Facets of Mindfulness

10 10HealthCare Chaplaincy Learning … To appreciate how the human mind works when it comes to managing a life To be critical of the concepts and theories—mind sets—we have inherited To create moments of psychological involvement to add quality to daily life To create moments for reflection in a busy life and for connecting human actions to an ethical life project

11 11HealthCare Chaplaincy INSIGHT Human beings are marvelous pattern-seeking, meaning-makers Some elements shared with other species We see the world in chunks, small and large!

12 12HealthCare Chaplaincy Terms vary for this adaptive advantage … patternsframes mental models mind sets stereotypes naïve theories

13 13HealthCare Chaplaincy INSIGHT At the same time, a mind set can be wrong!

14 14HealthCare Chaplaincy INSIGHT Another limit to human meaning-making … Another limit to human meaning-making … when we move through the life world as if sleep walking

15 15HealthCare Chaplaincy Listen to Maxine Greene “[If] teachers today are to initiate young people into an ethical existence, they themselves must attend more fully than they normally have to their own lives and its requirements; they have to break with the mechanical life, to overcome their own submergence in the habitual, even in what they conceive to be the virtuous, and ask the ‘why’ with which learning and moral reasoning begin.”

16 16HealthCare Chaplaincy Maxine read Alfred Schutz … Social phenomenologist, once at The New School He wrote about becoming “awake-in-the- world” – an complex ideal that Greene put to good, consistent use

17 17HealthCare Chaplaincy Contrast being half awake in the world to … “Pursuit involvement” on the ancient savannah, or the modern mall Mind and body are focused, behavior is purposeful If not scared to death, mood can be positive with lively fantasies

18 18HealthCare Chaplaincy Pursuits are, variously … Fun! Limit the vision of other pursuits Expose our minds to manipulation by corporate interests

19 19HealthCare Chaplaincy Listen to John Dewey … “We always live at the time we live and not at some other time, and only by extracting at each present time the full meaning of each present experience are we prepared for doing the same thing in the future.” “We always live at the time we live and not at some other time, and only by extracting at each present time the full meaning of each present experience are we prepared for doing the same thing in the future.”

20 20HealthCare Chaplaincy Personal examples of involving experiences … When playing or listening to music When playing a sport When meeting a new friend

21 21HealthCare Chaplaincy When doing something risky When participating in a true belief group When teaching When alone in a strange natural environment

22 22HealthCare Chaplaincy INSIGHT We humans learn to manipulate psychological experience all day long from that first coffee to settling down with a book or television before bed. We humans learn to manipulate psychological experience all day long from that first coffee to settling down with a book or television before bed.

23 23HealthCare Chaplaincy Let’s switch gears … we need concepts! The nature of psychological experience, motivation, and daily life are old, old topics in human affairs. We join the conversation late.

24 24HealthCare Chaplaincy Abraham Maslow’s work … Wanted a humanistic psychology, avoiding the reductionism of behaviorism and the “negativism” of existentialism Wanted to focus on growth, being, and self- actualization, not deficiency His methods—interviews and questionnaires of psychologically healthy people

25 25HealthCare Chaplaincy Characteristics of Maslow’s peak experience Sense of wholeness, an integrating experience Critical judgment suspended, loss of ego centeredness Clear perception Perception of beauty and goodness, if not awe

26 26HealthCare Chaplaincy and … Sense of self as active, responsible, bigger and stronger Feeling of gratitude Disorientation in time and space after the peak experience Sometimes the onset of the experience is unexpected, sudden, as if by surprise

27 27HealthCare Chaplaincy Underlying all the claims … Perception seems changed for a short period Mood becomes positive, which generalizes to most evaluations A powerful psychological experience! Sometimes the result is “high tension and excitement” At other times, a “plateau experience” defined by “peacefulness, quietness, the feeling of stillness.”

28 28HealthCare Chaplaincy Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s Theory of Flow Chaos, a natural and uncomfortable state which consciousness returns to if not ordered by human action Wanted people to control psychological experience because events are less under control Flow = “total involvement with life” … “heart, will, and mind” joined together … “in effortless action” Nearly identical psychological experience to Maslow’s peak experience

29 29HealthCare Chaplaincy His methods … Started with a Maslow-like method of interviewing people with flow experiences Created the Experience Sampling Method, using pagers and programmable watches, timed to go off eight times a day at random intervals

30 30HealthCare Chaplaincy Csikszentmihalyi’s theory of flow Learn to focus on and improve quality of psychological experience Flow most likely under three conditions: Clear purposes Clear purposes Relevant feedback on performance Relevant feedback on performance Challenge and skills are in balance Challenge and skills are in balance Attention becomes ordered and invested

31 31HealthCare Chaplaincy Listen to Ellen Langer … Most activities are neither positive nor negative in tone – what matters is what we invest in them. (Very Jamesian!) Most activities are neither positive nor negative in tone – what matters is what we invest in them. (Very Jamesian!) Need to challenge “premature cognitive commitments” Need to challenge “premature cognitive commitments” Students develop a fear of negative criticism and pursue the “illusion of the correct answer.” Students develop a fear of negative criticism and pursue the “illusion of the correct answer.”

32 32HealthCare Chaplaincy Langer continued … To increase mindful learning: To increase mindful learning: focus on questions on learning as a process, and on self-regulation To increase unmindful learning: To increase unmindful learning: focus on answers on learning as outcomes, and on expert authority

33 33HealthCare Chaplaincy Three Dimensions of Psychological Experience … MoodAttention Awareness or consciousness

34 34HealthCare Chaplaincy AWARENESS MOOD ATTENTION

35 35HealthCare Chaplaincy INSIGHT A critical distinction is needed … Psychological involvement Social engagement

36 36HealthCare Chaplaincy Listen to Thich Nhat Hanh … Ethical responsibility to live authentically and take care of others To try to control wandering attention, the “monkey mind” Focus on breathing in meditation Focus on breathing in meditation

37 37HealthCare Chaplaincy Don’t feed the monkey …

38 38HealthCare Chaplaincy THE LIFE PROJECT … Life as a project -- a long, bumpy search to become an authentic human being whose actions are guided by ethical purposes Life as a project -- a long, bumpy search to become an authentic human being whose actions are guided by ethical purposes

39 39HealthCare Chaplaincy ONE LAST INSIGHT Motivation, learning and environmental demand —an intimate, dynamic connection!

40 40HealthCare Chaplaincy PERSON DAILY DEMAND ENVIRONMENT PEER GROUP MENTORS REFLECTION TOOLS BUILT ENVIRONMENT WORK TASKS

41 41HealthCare Chaplaincy Three practical implications … 1.To change direction in a behavior or life, change the group you belong to – let the group socialize you. 2.Challenge the brain-mind-body to do its work by seeking demand environs. 3.As we get older, we need to increase demand environments and predicaments.

42 42HealthCare Chaplaincy See my website: Give me your address if you would like a copy of my talking points and slides. me at: Book signing shortly. Thank you!


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