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© 2010 Thomson South-Western Instructor Only Version CHAPTER 9 Informal Reports.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2010 Thomson South-Western Instructor Only Version CHAPTER 9 Informal Reports."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2010 Thomson South-Western Instructor Only Version CHAPTER 9 Informal Reports

2 Chapter 9, Slide 2 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Understanding Report Basics Formats  Letter  Memo  Manuscript  Printed form  Digital Functions  Informative reports  Analytical reports Patterns  Direct Pattern  Indirect pattern Report Delivery  In person  U.S. mail  Fax  or online  Online

3 Chapter 9, Slide 3 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e If readers are informed If readers are supportive If readers are eager to have results first Direct PatternPatterns The Direct Pattern

4 Chapter 1, Slide 4 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 9, Slide 4 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Direct Pattern Informational Report Introduction/Background __________________________________ Facts/Findings _________________ __________________________________ Summary ______________________ __________________________________ Analytical Report Introduction/Problem __________________________________ CONCLUSIONS/ RECOMMENDATIONS __________________________________ Facts/Findings __________________________________ Discussion/Analysis ____________ __________________________________

5 Chapter 9, Slide 5 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Patterns The Indirect Pattern If readers need to be educated If readers need to be persuaded If readers may be disappointed or hostile Indirect Pattern

6 Chapter 1, Slide 6 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 9, Slide 6 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Indirect Pattern Analytical Report Introduction/Problem __________________________________ Facts/Findings _________________ __________________________________ Discussion/Analysis __________________________________ CONCLUSIONS/ RECOMMENDATIONS ____________ __________________________________

7 Chapter 9, Slide 7 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Information Report—Letter Format Click icon to view example.

8 Chapter 9, Slide 8 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Letterhead stationery. Useful for informal reports sent to outsiders. Letter Memo style. Useful for informal reports circulated within organizations. Memo Plain paper. Useful for longer, more formal reports. Manuscript Standardized forms. Useful for routine activities, such as expense reports. Printed form Report Formats Viewed online. Useful for collaboration and for posting to company intranet. Digital

9 Chapter 9, Slide 9 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Guidelines for Developing Informal Reports  Determine problem and purpose.  Gather data.  Organize data.  Write first draft.  Edit and revise.

10 Chapter 9, Slide 10 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Where to Gather Data for Reports  Look in company records.  Make personal observations.  Use surveys, questionnaires, and inventories.  Conduct interviews.  Search printed material such as books, newspapers, and periodicals.  Search databases and other electronic resources.

11 Chapter 1, Slide 11 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 9, Slide 11 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Developing an Appropriate Writing Style

12 Chapter 1, Slide 12 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 9, Slide 12 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Report Writing Styles – Informal Style

13 Chapter 1, Slide 13 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 9, Slide 13 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Report Writing Styles –Formal Style

14 Chapter 9, Slide 14 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Being Objective in Writing Reports  Present both sides of an issue.  Separate fact from opinion.  Be sensitive and moderate in language.  Cite sources carefully.

15 Chapter 9, Slide 15 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Making Effective Report Headings  Use appropriate heading levels.  Strive for parallel construction within levels.  Use first- and second-level headings for short reports.  Capitalize and underline carefully.  Keep headings short but clear.

16 Chapter 9, Slide 16 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Don't use headings as antecedents for pronouns. For example, avoid: Inserting Hypertext Links. These links....  Include at least one heading per report page. Making Effective Report Headings

17 Chapter 9, Slide 17 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Preparing Typical Informal Reports  Information reports  Progress reports  Justification/recommendation reports  Feasibility reports  Minutes of meetings  Summaries

18 Chapter 9, Slide 18 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Information Reports  Information Reports Information reports provide findings without analysis or persuasion. For example, your boss asks you to investigate prepaid legal services as a possible employee benefit.

19 Chapter 9, Slide 19 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Information Reports  Explain why you are writing; define purpose.  Describe credibility of data methods and sources.  Provide background.  Preview what is to follow. FindingsConclusionIntroduction

20 Chapter 9, Slide 20 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Information Reports  Organize chronologically, alphabetically, topically, by importance, or by another method.  Group similar topics together.  Use appropriate headings. ConclusionIntroductionFindings

21 Chapter 9, Slide 21 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Information Reports  Summarize findings.  Suggest action to be taken.  Express appreciation, if applicable. FindingsIntroductionConclusion

22 Chapter 9, Slide 22 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Progress Reports  Progress Reports Progress reports explain the progress of continuing projects. For example, you must report on the progress of a golf tournament your organization is planning.

23 Chapter 9, Slide 23 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Progress Reports  Specify in the opening the purpose and nature of the project.  Provide background information if the audience requires filling in.  Describe the work completed.

24 Chapter 9, Slide 24 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Progress Reports  Explain the work currently in progress, including personnel, activities, methods, and locations.  Anticipate problems and possible remedies.  Discuss future activities and provide the expected completion date.

25 Chapter 9, Slide 25 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Progress Report – Memo Format Click icon to view example.

26 Chapter 9, Slide 26 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Justification/ Recommendation Reports Justification/recommendation reports are written to justify or recommend something, such as buying equipment, changing a procedure, hiring an employee, consolidating departments, and so forth.

27 Chapter 9, Slide 27 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Reader Response Determines Structure  Problem  Recommendations  Facts  Discussion  Problem  Facts  Discussion  Recommendations Indirect Pattern Direct Pattern Reader will likely agree with recommendations Reader will likely agree with recommendations Reader may opposerecommendations opposerecommendations

28 Chapter 9, Slide 28 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Use direct organization for nonsensitive topics and recommendations that will be agreeable to readers.  Use indirect organization when readers may oppose a recommendation or when circumstances suggest caution.  Identify the problem or the need briefly.  Announce the recommendation, solution, or action concisely and with action verbs. Justification/ Recommendation Reports

29 Chapter 9, Slide 29 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Identify the problem or the need briefly.  Announce the recommendation, solution, or action concisely and with action verbs.  Explain more fully the benefits of the recommendation or steps to be taken to solve the problem.  Present a discussion of pros, cons, and costs.  Conclude with a summary specifying the recommendation and action to be taken. Direct Pattern

30 Chapter 9, Slide 30 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Make a general reference to the problem in subject line.  Describe and establish credibility for the seriousness of the need or problem that your recommendation addresses.  Discuss alternative solutions, beginning with the least likely to succeed.  Present most promising alternative—your recommendation—last. Indirect Pattern

31 Chapter 9, Slide 31 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Indirect Pattern  Show how the advantages of your recommendation outweigh its disadvantages.  Summarize your recommendation and any action required.  Ask for authorization to proceed if necessary.

32 Chapter 9, Slide 32 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Justification/Recommendation Report—Memo Format Click icon to view example.

33 Chapter 9, Slide 33 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Feasibility Reports  Feasibility Reports Feasibility reports examine the practicality and advisability of following a course of action. For example, your company must decide whether to add a child- care facility.

34 Chapter 9, Slide 34 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Feasibility Reports  Begin by announcing your decision immediately.  Describe the background and problem necessitating the proposal.  Discuss the benefits of the proposal.  Describe any problems that may result.  Calculate the costs associated with the proposal, if appropriate.  Show the time frame necessary for implementation of the proposal.

35 Chapter 9, Slide 35 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Feasibility Report – Memo Format Click icon to view example.

36 Chapter 9, Slide 36 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Minutes of Meetings Meeting minutes summarize the proceedings of a meeting.

37 Chapter 9, Slide 37 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Minutes of Meetings  Include name of group, date, time, place, name of the meeting.  List names of attendees and absentees.  Describe disposition of previous minutes.  Record old business, new business, announcements, and reports.  Include the precise wording of motions.

38 Chapter 9, Slide 38 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Minutes of Meetings  Record the vote and action taken.  Conclude with the name and signature of the individual recording the minutes.

39 Chapter 9, Slide 39 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Minutes of Meeting—Report Format Click icon to view example.

40 Chapter 9, Slide 40 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Summaries Summaries compress data from a longer publication, such as a business report, a magazine article, or a book chapter.

41 Chapter 9, Slide 41 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Summaries  Present the goal or purpose of the document being summarized.  Highlight the research methods (if appropriate), findings, conclusions, and recommendations.  Omit illustrations, examples, and references.  Organize for readability by including headings and bulleted or enumerated lists.  Include your reactions or an overall evaluation of the document if asked to do so.

42 Chapter 9, Slide 42 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Executive Summary Click icon to view example.

43 © 2010 Thomson South-Western Instructor Only Version END


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