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Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Mary Ellen Guffey Copyright © 2008 Chapter 14 Business Presentations.

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Presentation on theme: "Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Mary Ellen Guffey Copyright © 2008 Chapter 14 Business Presentations."— Presentation transcript:

1 Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Mary Ellen Guffey Copyright © 2008 Chapter 14 Business Presentations

2 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 2 Business Presentations Multimedia Presentations Effective Oral Presentations Organization and Structure Building Rapport Telephone and Voice Mail Skills Intercultural Audiences

3 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 3 Preparing Effective Oral Presentations Know your purpose.  Decide what you want your audience to believe, remember, or do when you finish.  Aim all parts of your talk toward your purpose.

4 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 4 © Glowimages / Getty Images  Analyze the age, gender, education, experience, knowledge, and size of your audience.  Decide what organizational pattern, delivery style, and supporting material will work best. Preparing Effective Oral Presentations Know your audience.

5 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 5 Organize the introduction.  Capture attention with a promise, story, startling fact, question, quotation, problem, or story.  Establish your credibility by identifying your position, expertise, knowledge, or qualifications.  Preview your main points. Preparing Effective Oral Presentations

6 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 6 © Flying Colours Ltd / Digital Vision / Getty Images Organize the body of your presentation.  Develop two to four main points. Streamline your topic and summarize its principal parts.  Arrange the points logically: chronologically, from most important to least, by comparison and contrast, or by some other strategy.  Have extra material ready. Be prepared with more information and visuals if needed. Preparing Effective Oral Presentations

7 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 7 © Image Source / Alamy Organize the conclusion.  Summarize your main themes.  Leave the audience with a specific and memorable “takeaway.” Tell how listeners can use this information, why you have spoken, or what you want them to do.  Include a statement that allows you to leave the podium gracefully. Preparing Effective Oral Presentations

8 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 8 Methods for Organizing an Oral Presentation Chronology Example: Describe the history of a problem, organized from the first sign of trouble to the present. Geography/space Example: Arrange a discussion of the changing demographics of the workforce by regions, such as East Coast, West Coast, and so forth.

9 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 9 Topic/function/conventional grouping Example: Organize a report discussing mishandled airline baggage by the names of airlines. Comparison/contrast (pro/con) Example: Compare organic farming methods with those of modern industrial farming. Methods for Organizing an Oral Presentation

10 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 10 Methods for Organizing an Oral Presentation Journalism pattern Example: Explain how identity thieves ruin your good name by discussing who, what, when, where, why, and how. Value/size Example: Arrange a report describing fluctuations in housing costs by house value groups (houses that cost $300,000, $400,000, and so forth).

11 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 11 Methods for Organizing an Oral Presentation Importance Example: Organize from most important to least important the reason a company should move its headquarters to a specific city. Problem/solution Example: Discuss a problem followed by possible solutions.

12 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 12 Methods for Organizing an Oral Presentation Simple/complex Example: Organize a report explaining genetic modification of plants by discussing simple seed production progressing to complex gene introduction. Best case/worst case Example: Analyze whether two companies should merge by presenting the best case result (improved market share, profitability, employee morale) opposed to the worst case result (devalued stock, lost market share, employee malaise).

13 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 13 Oral Presentation Outline Title Purpose I. INTRODUCTION Gain audience attention A. Involve audience B. Establish credibility C. Preview main points D. Transition II. BODY Main point A. Illustrate, clarify, contrast

14 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 14 Oral Presentation Outline Transition Main point B. Illustrate, clarify, contrast Transition 3. Main point C. Illustrate, clarify, contrast Transition III. CONCLUSION Summarize main points A. Provide final focus, benefits B. Encourage questions C.

15 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 15 Building Audience Rapport Like a Pro Effective Imagery Analogy A wiki is similar to a collection of post-it notes. Metaphor Time is a river flowing from the past into the future. Simile Launching a hedge fund is like buying a lottery ticket.

16 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 16 Building Audience Rapport Like a Pro Personal anecdote "I started this business in my garage...." Personalized statistics Consumers paid $28 billion for coffee last year. That means that every coffee drinker in this room spent $364 a year on coffee. Effective Imagery

17 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 17 Building Audience Rapport Like a Pro Worst- and best-case scenario In a worst-case scenario, spammers may now work with overseas organized crime groups, employing Trojan-horse attacks that can turn PCs into “zombie” machines that spew out spam under the noses of their unwitting owners. Effective Imagery

18 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 18 Previewing Now we will consider the opposite view. Next I’m going to discuss…. Summarizing You see, then, that the most important elements are…. Let me review the major problems I have presented…. Building Audience Rapport Like a Pro Verbal Signposts

19 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 19 Switching directions Up to this point, I have talked only about… now let’s look at…. Those are all good reasons to support the proposal. But let’s also consider the negatives. Building Audience Rapport Like a Pro Verbal Signposts

20 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 20 © Jon Feingersh / Blend Images / Getty Images  Look terrific!  Animate your body.  Speak extemporaneously.  Punctuate your words.  Get out from behind the podium.  Vary your facial expression. Nonverbal Messages Building Audience Rapport Like a Pro

21 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 21 Nine Techniques for Gaining and Keeping Audience Attention A promise “By the end of the presentation, you will be able to…” Tell a moving story; describe a serious problem. Drama

22 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 22 Eye contact Command attention at the beginning to making eye contact with as many people as possible. Movement Leave the lectern area. Move toward the audience. Nine Techniques for Gaining and Keeping Audience Attention

23 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 23 Questions Ask for show of hands. Use rhetorical questions. Demonstrations Include a member of the audience. Nine Techniques for Gaining and Keeping Audience Attention

24 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 24 Samples/gimmicks Award prizes to participants; pass out samples. Visuals Use a variety of visual aids. Nine Techniques for Gaining and Keeping Audience Attention

25 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 25 Self-interest Tell audience what’s in it for them. Nine Techniques for Gaining and Keeping Audience Attention

26 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 26 Planning Visual Aids, Handouts, and Multimedia Presentations Select the medium carefully.  Consider the size of audience and degree of formality desired.  Consider cost, ease of preparation, and potential effectiveness.

27 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 27 Highlight main ideas.  Focus on major concepts only.  Avoid overkill. Showing too many graphics reduces their effectiveness.  Keep all visuals simple. Planning Visual Aids, Handouts, and Multimedia Presentations

28 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 28 Ensure visibility.  Use large type for slides and transparencies.  Be sure all audience members can see. Planning Visual Aids, Handouts, and Multimedia Presentations

29 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 29 Enhance comprehension.  Give the audience a moment to study a visual before discussing it.  Paraphrase its verbal message; don’t read it. Planning Visual Aids, Handouts, and Multimedia Presentations

30 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 30 Practice using your visual aids.  Rehearse your talk, perfecting your handling of the visual aids.  Talk to the audience and not to the visual. Planning Visual Aids, Handouts, and Multimedia Presentations

31 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 31 Eight Steps to a Powerful Multimedia Presentation Start with the text. Write out the entire content of your presentation before making any slides.

32 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 32 Select background and fonts. Select or create a template with consistent font styles, font sizes, and an appropriate background. Eight Steps to a Powerful Multimedia Presentation

33 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 33 Choose images that help communicate your message. Use only relevant clipart, photographs, or maps— with permission. Eight Steps to a Powerful Multimedia Presentation

34 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 34 Create graphics. Illustrate your slides by using Draw, AutoShapes, and Diagram Gallery. Avoid too many bullet points, too many details, and too much text. Observe the 6-x-6 rule. Exception: When slides are to be viewed without a narrator. Eight Steps to a Powerful Multimedia Presentation

35 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 35 Add special effects. Consider animating bullet points to appear one at a time. Consider motion paths, animation options, and transition effects. Eight Steps to a Powerful Multimedia Presentation

36 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 36 Create hyperlinks to approximate the Web browsing experience. Consider making your presentation interactive by linking to other slides, other programs, or to the Internet. Eight Steps to a Powerful Multimedia Presentation

37 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 37 Engage your audience by asking for interaction. When audience feedback is needed, present polling questions. These are useful for surveys, opinion polls, group decision making, voting, quizzes, tests, and other applications. Audience members use hand-held devices read by a PowerPoint add-in device. Eight Steps to a Powerful Multimedia Presentation

38 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 38 Move your presentation to the Internet. Post your slides online for others to access. Even if you are giving a face-to- face presentation, attendees appreciate these electronic handouts because they don't have to lug them home. A more complex option involves a Web conference or broadcast. Eight Steps to a Powerful Multimedia Presentation

39 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 39 Overcoming Stage Fright  Urge to flee!  Pounding heart  Short breath  Sweaty palms  Dry throat  Unsteady voice  Trembling hands  Tied tongue  Wobbly knees  Stomach butterflies Symptoms of Stage Fright

40 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 40 Ways to Overcome Stage Fright  Select a familiar, relevant topic. Prepare 150 percent.  Use positive self-talk.  Convert your fear into anticipation and enthusiasm.  Shift the focus from yourself to your visuals.  Give yourself permission to make an occasional mistake.  Ignore stumbles; keep going. Don’t apologize.  Make the listeners your partners. Get them involved.  Just before you talk, practice deep breathing. Overcoming Stage Fright

41 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 41 Polishing Your Delivery and Following Up Before Your Presentation  Prepare thoroughly.  Rehearse repeatedly.  Time yourself.  Check the room.  Greet members of the audience.  Practice stress reduction.

42 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 42 During Your Presentation  Begin with a pause.  Present your first sentence from memory.  Maintain eye contact.  Control your voice and vocabulary.  Put the brakes on.  Move naturally. Polishing Your Delivery and Following Up

43 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 43 During Your Presentation  Use visual aids effectively.  Avoid digressions.  Ignore stumbles; keep going; don't apologize.  Use positive self-talk.  Summarize your main points and arrive at the high point of your talk. Polishing Your Delivery and Following Up

44 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 44 After Your Presentation  Distribute handouts.  Encourage questions.  Repeat questions.  Reinforce your main points.  Keep control.  Avoid Yes, but answers.  End with a summary and appreciation. Polishing Your Delivery and Following Up

45 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 45  Anticipate expectations and perceptions that differ from what you consider normal.  Decide whether your presentation style should be more formal than it normally is.  Consider breaking your presentation into short segments. Adapting to International and Cross-Cultural Audiences

46 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 46 Adapting to International and Cross-Cultural Audiences  Match your presentation and your nonverbal messages to the expectations of your audience.  Consider explaining important concepts in several ways using different words.  Consider asking audience members to relay their understanding back to you.

47 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 47  Remember that audience members may be too polite to acknowledge that they don't understand.  Provide handouts in English and in the target language. Adapting to International and Cross-Cultural Audiences

48 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 48 © C Squared Studios / Photodisc / Getty Images Improving Telephone and Voice Mail Skills Making Calls  Plan a mini agenda.  Use a three-point introduction: 1.Your name 2.Your affiliation 3.A brief explanation of why you are calling

49 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 49 Making Calls  Be cheerful and accurate.  Bring it to a close.  Avoid telephone tag.  Leave complete voic messages. Improving Telephone and Voice Mail Skills

50 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 50 Receiving Calls  Identify yourself immediately.  Be responsive and helpful.  Be cautious when answering calls for others.  Take messages carefully.  Explain when transferring calls. Improving Telephone and Voice Mail Skills

51 51 End Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 6e Ch. 14, Slide 51


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