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Imperialism World History.

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Presentation on theme: "Imperialism World History."— Presentation transcript:

1 Imperialism World History

2 Imperialism “When a strong nation seeks to dominate other countries or territories” Control over: Economy Politics Society (social issues)

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4 Africa in the early 1800’s Hundreds of ethnic groups
Over 1,000 languages spoken Most followed traditional beliefs and religions Society: Large empires to small villages Rivers were wild and difficult to navigate Jungles were dense and made travel difficult Africans were experts at trading rare natural resources (gold-salt Sahara; Swahili East Coast trade)

5 Scramble for Africa Main Idea: Europeans established colonies by ignoring the claims of African ethnic groups, kingdoms, and city-states. Why it matters now: African nations continue to feel the effects of the colonization more than 100 years later.

6 Scramble for Africa European countries colonized areas in Africa south of the Sahara local populations were enslaved, exploited, and sometimes exterminated. Video: 7CC88-0EDE-43C4-98DC-2B720A85BA1B

7 How it all began… David Livingstone, a Scottish missionary, traveled to promote Christianity in Africa and DISAPPEARED! An American journalist, Henry Stanley was hired to find him and did! Made headlines and helped bring Africa’s undiscovered wealth to the attention of the world. Stanley continued to explore on behalf of Belgium “Dr. Livingstone, I presume?”

8 Motives behind Imperialism
1. Belief in European Superiority (racism!) Non-Europeans were considered to be a “lesser race” because they had not achieved European scientific and technological progress.This was a reflection of Social Darwinism (humans/societies who were fittest for survival enjoyed wealth and success) Thus, Europeans had a “obligation” to better these “lesser races”.

9 An example….don’t write this down
I contend that we [Britons] are the first race in the world, and the more of the world we inhabit, the better it is for the human race. … It is our duty to seize every opportunity of acquiring more territory and we should keep this one idea steadily before our eyes that more territory simply means more of the Anglo-Saxon race, more of the best, the most human, most honorable race the world possesses. — Cecil Rhodes, Confession of Faith, 1887 1 – Is Cecil Rhodes in favor of or opposed to imperialism, and what rationale (reason) does he give for his stance? 2 – What one idea does Rhodes think Great Britain should be focused on?

10 Motives behind Imperialism
2. Economic Competition—need for natural resources and new markets to feed the expanding Industrial Revolution Rubber, Ivory, lumber, etc. Forced Africans to grow cash crops; causes food shortages. 3. Missionary Spirit—a divine duty spread Christianity to those still practicing indigenous beliefs

11 Motives behind Imperialism
4. Nationalism- to gain power and prestige for their country, Europeans sought to acquire colonies.  Famous political cartoon of Cecil Rhodes.

12 Factors that made Imperialism successful
Steam engines on boats and trains allowed Europeans to travel throughout the continent. Telegraph enabled colonizing Europeans to communicate with homeland Use of quinine helped protect Europeans from malaria Advanced weaponry ensured military dominance over Africans

13 Maxim Gun—first automatic machine gun

14 Factors that made Imperialism successful
Diversity of cultures discouraged African unity History of conflict between tribes Europeans take advantage of this vulnerability

15 Berlin Conference ( )

16 Berlin Conference ( ) To avoid wars between European countries over territory in Africa… 14 European countries meet to discuss rules for division. Countries must publicly claim land and prove ability to control it (ex: military & infrasturcture in place) No African ruler was invited No attention was given to ethnic or linguistic divisions Created indigenous tensions that would EXPLODE once the countries gained independence in the 20th century.

17 Resistance to Imperialism
Despite Eur. advantages, Africans fight colonization Zulu nation’s highly centralized state nearly defeats English army Boer War ( )—Long established Dutch Farmers pushed out of South Africa by British. Later fight back in a bloody “total” war. Dutch lose. Ethiopia successfully defeats Italy and remains free. They then gathered modern weapons to use in the future.

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19 Systems of Imperial Control
COLONY: A COUNTRY OR TERRITORY GOVERNED BY A FOREIGN POWER (EX: THE BRITISH IN INDIA) SPHERE OF INFLUENCE: A REGION IN A FOREIGN COUNTRY WHERE ANOTHER NATION CLAIMS EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC RIGHTS (EX. = BRITISH IN AREAS OF CHINA) ECONOMIC IMPERIALISM: A COUNTRY CONTROLLED BY A PRIVATE BUSINESS FOR ECONOMIC GAIN (EX: BRITISH EAST INDIA COMPANY)

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21 British Imperialism in India
Seeking spices and profit, England establishes trading posts in India in the 1600’s. English government allows Br. East India Company to increase territory and govern the entire colony. Company army made up of sepoy soldiers (Indians) and led by British officers. “Jewel of the Crown”—India is the most valuable of all colonies serves crucial role as supplier of raw materials and new markets for British goods

22 Sepoy Mutiny Indian soldiers rebel against the British
Cartridges of new rifles were greased with beef and pork fat. (ends must be bitten off to be used) Muslims and Hindus refuse to use them East India Co. handled situation badly, but still won. Internal conflicts prevent Indian unity British gov’t takes over rule in 1858 from E.I.C. This is a turning point in Indian history

23 Legacy of British rule in India
Positive: RAILROADS CONNECTED INDIA = MODERN ECONOMY AND UNITY INFRASTRUCTURE: ROADS, DAMS, BRIDGES, IRRIGATION CANALS, TELEGRAPH LINES SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS BUILT MADE COUNTRY SAFER Negative: INDIA LOST POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC POWER FAMINE : BRITISH PUSHED CASH CROPS OVER FOOD THAT FED INDIANS RACISM: INDIANS TREATED LIKE 2ND CLASS CITIZENS

24 China in Isolation Since the Great Wall was built, China practiced a policy of isolationism (policy avoiding political and military involvement with other countries) China was self-sufficient; they needed nothing from the outside world Unable to trade traditional goods, the British introduced OPIUM (a highly addictive drug) to Chinese markets. By 1835, 12 million Chinese are addicted

25 Opium War (1839) British win, leading to Treaty of Nanjing
Chinese Emperor is concerned/angry that the addictions have harmed his subjects British ignore his claims, leading to war. British win, leading to Treaty of Nanjing British gain island of Hong Kong Foreigners gain freedom from Chinese law in spheres of influence.

26 Taiping Rebellion 1850’s-1864 Chinese population growth exceeds food supply causing famine (leads to increase in opium addiction) Hong Xiuquan begins a rebellion to bring prosperity and equality to all Chinese Hong’s million-man rebel army controls SE China Imperial, British, and French troops put down rebellion at great cost (20 million dead Chinese)

27 Foreign Influence 1862-1908 Empress Cixi rules and starts reforms
Foreign powers take advantage of mixed results of reforms and “strong-arm” China into accepting foreign trade advantages Open Door Policy (1899): U.S. proposal that China be open to trading by all countries and would not be colonized weakens idea of “spheres of influence”

28 Boxer Rebellion Ordinary Chinese feel humiliated
Push for reforms which lead creation of secret society (Society of Righteous & Harmonious Fists) Erupts into wide-spread revolt against Empress and all foreigners (“Death to the foreign devils!”) Multi-national force finally defeats rebels Chinese nationalism surges after Boxer Rebellion and carries on into early 1900’s


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