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Authored by Rich Simerson 26-Sep-94 Revised 01-Apr-2010 Modified by Lt Colonel Fred Blundell TX-129 Fort Worth Senior Squadron For Local Training Rev 5.0.

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Presentation on theme: "Authored by Rich Simerson 26-Sep-94 Revised 01-Apr-2010 Modified by Lt Colonel Fred Blundell TX-129 Fort Worth Senior Squadron For Local Training Rev 5.0."— Presentation transcript:

1 Authored by Rich Simerson 26-Sep-94 Revised 01-Apr-2010 Modified by Lt Colonel Fred Blundell TX-129 Fort Worth Senior Squadron For Local Training Rev Jan

2 2 This Training Slide Show is a project undertaken by Lt Colonel Fred Blundell of the TX-129 Fort Worth Senior Squadron, Fort Worth, TX for local use to assist those CAP Members interested in advancing their skills. The information contained herein is for CAP Member’s personal use and is not intended to replace or be a substitute for any of the CAP National Training Programs. Users should review the presentation’s Revision Number at the end of each file name to ensure that they have the most current publication.

3 Objectives  Plan and describe how to fly the following search patterns: Route (track crawl) Route (track crawl) Parallel track (sweep) Parallel track (sweep) Creeping line Creeping line Point-based (expanding square and sector) Point-based (expanding square and sector)  Discuss how to plan and fly a Contour search pattern 3

4 The “Stupid Check”  “Hey! Wait a minute. This is stupid.”  Do my headings, waypoints, lat/long coordinates, and distances look sensible  Perform: After planning After planning When you start your pattern When you start your pattern Periodically thereafter Periodically thereafter 4

5 Examples  The following examples and worksheets are covered to aid in pre-planning a search pattern  Designed for non-moving map GPS, but include all the information you need to set up the GX55  Advantages of pre-planning: Sets the details of the sortie in your mind Sets the details of the sortie in your mind Makes entering data (correctly) into your GPS easier Makes entering data (correctly) into your GPS easier Allows pilot and observer to concentrate on their primary task by minimizing navaid setup time and reducing confusion Allows pilot and observer to concentrate on their primary task by minimizing navaid setup time and reducing confusion 5

6 Latitude, Longitude, Distance, GPS  One minute latitude = nm Fly one minute north or south, cover one nautical mile (a 1-nm leg width) Fly one minute north or south, cover one nautical mile (a 1-nm leg width)  One minute longitude = anywhere from to nm in the continental U.S. Means you’ll have to fly anywhere from 1.1 – 1.4 minutes of longitude (east or west) to cover one nautical mile Means you’ll have to fly anywhere from 1.1 – 1.4 minutes of longitude (east or west) to cover one nautical mile Not hard to do, but for training we will use one minute = one mile, even though we’ll be flying less than 1-nm leg widths Not hard to do, but for training we will use one minute = one mile, even though we’ll be flying less than 1-nm leg widths To get the relationship in your area, go to To get the relationship in your area, go to 1 minute of Longitude = cos(Latitude in Degrees) 1 minute of Longitude = cos(Latitude in Degrees) 6

7 Route Search Track of missing aircraft 1/2 S Track of search aircraft 7

8 Route Search Example  Assume we’re searching for an aircraft along Highway 46, between Columbus and Greensburg: Draw the route on the worksheet Include significant turns in the highway and other identifiers such as towns, airports and major intersections Search two miles either side of the highway 8

9 9

10 m GPS Data m Set up User Waypoints m Enter Route m Use CDI to indicate “S” m Starting Waypoint: BMG m Spacing: 1 nm m Number of Passes: 3 m Start Side: Left 10

11 Parallel Track Search (Grid Search) 11

12 Grid Search Example  Assume we’re searching STL #104-D for a missing aircraft: Quarter-grid, 7.5' x 7.5‘ Quarter-grid, 7.5' x 7.5‘ Enter the northeast corner Enter the northeast corner One nm track spacing One nm track spacing North/South legs North/South legs No aircraft assigned to adjacent grids No aircraft assigned to adjacent grids 12

13 GRID SEARCH WORKSHEET EXAMPLE 13

14 GRID SEARCH GX55 m GX55 Data m Type Grid & Sectional: US, STL m Pattern: Parallel Line m Grid: 104D2 m Spacing: 1 nm m Direction of Travel: N/S 14

15 FLYING THE GRID m GPS Data m Think ILS Approach. m Keep the Lat/Lon Centered. m Watch for Turn. m Intercept and Track. m Direction of Travel: N/S m Entry Point: NE Corner m Spacing: 1 nm 15

16 Creeping Line Search sssss Direction of Search 16

17 Creeping Line Search Example  Assume we’re searching for an aircraft along Highway 31: Draw the route on the worksheet Draw the route on the worksheet Start at the intersection of Hwy 31/9 (southeast of Columbus) Start at the intersection of Hwy 31/9 (southeast of Columbus) Stop at the intersection of Hwy 31/50 (east of Seymour) Stop at the intersection of Hwy 31/50 (east of Seymour) Search three miles either side of Hwy 31 Search three miles either side of Hwy 31 1-nm track spacing 1-nm track spacing 17

18 CREEPING LINE SEARCH SHEET EXAMPLE 18

19 Creeping Line Search Example (CDI Method)  Assume we’re searching for an aircraft along the extended runway centerline of BMG runway 06: Draw the route on the worksheet Draw the route on the worksheet Search 10 nm beyond the end of runway 06 (southwest) Search 10 nm beyond the end of runway 06 (southwest) Search three miles either side of the extended centerline Search three miles either side of the extended centerline 1-nm track spacing 1-nm track spacing 19

20 CREEPING LINE SEARCH WORKSHEET EXAMPLE (CDI) m GX55 Data m Type Grid & Sectional: US, STL m Pattern: Creeping Line m Starting Waypoint: BMG m Spacing: 1 nm m Direction of Travel: 060º m Leg Length: 3 nm m Start Side: Right 20

21 FLYING THE CREEPING LINE SEARCH (CDI) m GPS Data m Determine Far Waypoint. m Fly to First Crossing Point. m Hit DIRECT TO (draws line). m Circle Back to Entry point. m Use CDI for XTrack. m Use Distance TO for Crossings. 21

22 Expanding Square Search (Second Pass Rotated 45°) 1S 2S 3S 4S 5S 22

23 Expanding Square Search Example  Assume we’re searching for a missing ultra-light: Draw the route on the worksheet Draw the route on the worksheet Center is a 483 AGL tower approximately 8 nm west of Seymour Center is a 483 AGL tower approximately 8 nm west of Seymour Use cardinal headings, starting to the north Use cardinal headings, starting to the north 23

24 EXPANDING SQUARE WORKSHEET EXAMPLE m GX55 Data m Type Grid & Sectional: US, STL m Pattern: Expanding Square m Starting Waypoint: N 38º 59´ W 86º 10´ m Spacing: 1 nm m Direction of Travel: 000º 24

25 Sector Search Sector search is easier to fly than expanding square The pattern provides concentrated coverage near the center of the area This pattern is used when an electronic search has led the crew to a general area to find the exact location visually The pattern and headings are planned in advance S max S mean 25

26 Contour Search This is a difficult and dangerous pattern to fly. Requires special training such as the Mountain Flying course. 26

27 QUESTIONS? 27 Always Think Safety!


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