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Scott Brody Owner & Director of Camps Kenwood & Evergreen Founder of Everwood Day Camp

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Presentation on theme: "Scott Brody Owner & Director of Camps Kenwood & Evergreen Founder of Everwood Day Camp"— Presentation transcript:

1 Scott Brody Owner & Director of Camps Kenwood & Evergreen Founder of Everwood Day Camp scott@kenwood-evergreen.com

2 Which Traits Are Children Born With? The Drive to Help (Altruism) The Drive to Help (Altruism) The Drive to Master The Drive to Master Problem-Solving Problem-Solving Social Connection Social Connection Instinctive Optimism Instinctive Optimism Intrinsic Motivation Intrinsic Motivation The Drive to Acquire Knowledge & Develop Intelligence The Drive to Acquire Knowledge & Develop Intelligence

3 You Don’t See Unmotivated Babies!

4 Babies Are Engaged Learners

5 The Challenge: MANY OF THE THINGS ADULTS DO TO HELP AND TO MOTIVATE OUR CHILDREN CONSPIRE TO HELP THEM BECOME NON-LEARNERS! MANY OF THE THINGS ADULTS DO TO HELP AND TO MOTIVATE OUR CHILDREN CONSPIRE TO HELP THEM BECOME NON-LEARNERS!

6 Labeling of Children:

7

8 Feeling This Creates in Children:

9 The Trophy Generation:

10 How Do We Make Help Children Remain Engaged Learners? MINDSET MATTERS!

11 Where The Research Began: Carol Dweck has done research over the last 30 years with children and young adults in the USA Carol Dweck has done research over the last 30 years with children and young adults in the USA She is particularly interested in how students view themselves as learners She is particularly interested in how students view themselves as learners Their self-theory is likely to have a major effect on their self-belief, their motivation to learn and their resilience Their self-theory is likely to have a major effect on their self-belief, their motivation to learn and their resilience Carol Dweck’s Self-Theories Carol Dweck’s Self-Theories Their Role in Motivation, Personality & Development (Psychology Press, 1999) Their Role in Motivation, Personality & Development (Psychology Press, 1999)

12 Years of Research

13 New Insights: Brain Plasticity

14 Self Theory = Mindset Dweck’s research into Self- Theories has shown that most people have one of two Mindsets: Dweck’s research into Self- Theories has shown that most people have one of two Mindsets: Fixed Mindset, or Fixed Mindset, or Growth Mindset Growth Mindset

15 Growth Mindset: 40% of Kids Growth Mindset I believe that intelligence is not fixed. My intelligence can be improved through learning I thrive on challenge & throw myself info difficult tasks. I have learning goals & like feedback so I can improve!

16 Fixed Mindset: 40% of kids Fixed Mindset I believe that intelligence is fixed I don’t like challenge because it makes me look stupid I was born bright/not very bright I like easy goals & being told I’ve done well & am smart

17 Four Things You Probably Believe About Mindset: Belief : Children with high ability are more likely to display a growth mindset Belief : Children with high ability are more likely to display a growth mindset Truth : Truth : You might think that students who were highly skilled would be the ones to relish a challenge and persevere in the face of setbacks. Instead, many of these students are the most worried about failure, and the most likely to question their ability and to wilt when they hit obstacles (Leggett, 1985) You might think that students who were highly skilled would be the ones to relish a challenge and persevere in the face of setbacks. Instead, many of these students are the most worried about failure, and the most likely to question their ability and to wilt when they hit obstacles (Leggett, 1985)

18 Four Things You Probably Believe About Mindset: Belief : Success in school or in life directly fosters a growth mindset. Belief : Success in school or in life directly fosters a growth mindset. Truth : You might also think that when students succeed, they are emboldened and energized to seek out more challenging tasks. The truth is that success in itself does little to boost children’s desire for challenge or their ability to cope with setbacks. In fact we can see that it can have quite the opposite effect. (Diener & Dweck, 1978, 1980) Truth : You might also think that when students succeed, they are emboldened and energized to seek out more challenging tasks. The truth is that success in itself does little to boost children’s desire for challenge or their ability to cope with setbacks. In fact we can see that it can have quite the opposite effect. (Diener & Dweck, 1978, 1980)

19 Four Things You Probably Believe About Mindset: Belief : Praise, particularly praising a student’s intelligence, encourages mastery-oriented qualities (growth mindset). Belief : Praise, particularly praising a student’s intelligence, encourages mastery-oriented qualities (growth mindset). Truth: This is a most cherished belief in our society. One can hardly walk down the street without hearing parents telling their children how smart they are. The hope is that such praise will instill confidence and thereby promote a host of desirable qualities. Instead, this type of praise can lead children to fear failure, avoid risks, doubt themselves when they fail and cope poorly with setbacks. (Mueller & Dweck, 1998) Truth: This is a most cherished belief in our society. One can hardly walk down the street without hearing parents telling their children how smart they are. The hope is that such praise will instill confidence and thereby promote a host of desirable qualities. Instead, this type of praise can lead children to fear failure, avoid risks, doubt themselves when they fail and cope poorly with setbacks. (Mueller & Dweck, 1998)

20 Four Things You Probably Believe About Mindset: Belief : A child’s confidence in his/her intelligence is the key to mastery-oriented qualities (growth mindset). Belief : A child’s confidence in his/her intelligence is the key to mastery-oriented qualities (growth mindset). Truth: It seems only logical to assume that children who have confidence in their intelligence—who clearly believe they are smart—would have nothing to fear from challenge and would be resilient. But many of the most confident individuals do not want their intelligence too stringently tested, and their high confidence is all too quickly shaken when they encounter difficulty. (Henderson & Dweck, 1990; Dweck & Lin, 1998) Truth: It seems only logical to assume that children who have confidence in their intelligence—who clearly believe they are smart—would have nothing to fear from challenge and would be resilient. But many of the most confident individuals do not want their intelligence too stringently tested, and their high confidence is all too quickly shaken when they encounter difficulty. (Henderson & Dweck, 1990; Dweck & Lin, 1998)

21 Mindset Rule #1 Fixed Mindset: Fixed Mindset: LOOK SMART AT ALL COSTS LOOK SMART AT ALL COSTS Growth Mindset: Growth Mindset: LEARN AT ALL COSTS LEARN AT ALL COSTS

22 Dweck Study: Transition to 7 th Grade Followed hundreds of students across difficult transition Followed hundreds of students across difficult transition Measured their mindsets Measured their mindsets Measured their attitudes toward learning Measured their attitudes toward learning Monitored their grades in math for two years Monitored their grades in math for two years

23 Dweck Study: Transition to 7 th Grade Achievement in Junior HS Blackwell, Dweck, & Trzesniewski (2007)

24 Dweck Study: Pre-Med Students

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26 Mindset Rule #2: Fixed Mindset: IT SHOULD COME NATURALLY Growth Mindset: WORK HARD, EFFORT IS KEY

27 Which Is True?

28 Do Geniuses Work-- Or Does it Just Come Naturally?

29 Mindset Rule #3: In The Face of Setbacks… Fixed Mindset: It’s about me HIDE MISTAKES CONCEAL DEFICIENCIES Growth Mindset: It’s about learning CAPITALIZE ON MISTAKES CONFRONT DEFICIENCIES

30 After Setback… Fixed Mindset: “I’d spend less time on this subject from now on.” “I would try not to take this subject ever again.” “I would try to cheat on the next test.” Growth Mindset: “I would work harder in this class from now on.” “I would spend more time studying for the tests.”

31 Growth Mindset Brains Work Harder! Moser et al., 2011

32 Fixed Mindset provides no recipe for recovering from failures: Giving up, retreating to comfort zone Giving up, retreating to comfort zone Blaming others Blaming others Trying to feel superior Trying to feel superior

33 How Are Mindsets Transmitted? Our language tells children what we believe and what we value Our language tells children what we believe and what we value Mueller & Dweck, 1998; Kamins & Dweck,1 999; Cimpian, Arce, Markman, & Dweck, 2007. Mueller & Dweck, 1998; Kamins & Dweck,1 999; Cimpian, Arce, Markman, & Dweck, 2007.

34 How We Praise…

35 Dweck Study: Non-Verbal IQ Test

36 Dweck Study: Messages About What We Value Intelligence Praise: “Wow, that’s a really good score. You must be smart at this.” Effort (Process) Praise: “Wow, that’s a really good score. You must have tried really hard.” Control Group : : “Wow, that’s a really good score.”

37 Dweck Study: Intelligence vs. Effort Praise Mindset: Fixed vs. Growth Goals: Looking smart vs. Learning After Difficult Trial: Confidence/ Enjoyment/Performance

38 Dweck Study: Intelligence vs. Effort Praise Lying: Students Who Misrepresented Their Scores

39 Process Praise We need to praise : We need to praise : Effort Effort Strategies that lead towards success Strategies that lead towards success Resilience Resilience We should not praise : We should not praise : Intelligence, “cleverness” or innate talent Intelligence, “cleverness” or innate talent

40 Key Messages to Produce Growth Mindset

41

42 The brain is a network of cells (neurons)

43 Key Messages to Produce Growth Mindset The cells communicate through chemical messages

44 Key Messages to Produce Growth Mindset The messages signal other neurons whether to fire or not

45 Dweck Study: Learning About Brain Plasticity Produced Growth Mindset Math Grades (Blackwell, Trzesniewski, & Dweck)

46 Dweck Study: Learning About Brain Plasticity Produced Growth Mindset Percent Showing Increased Motivation

47 How Do We Help Our Campers Move from Fixed to Growth Mindset? Counselors can role model Growth Mindset—they are living it. Counselors can role model Growth Mindset—they are living it. Essential that we show them we believe their intelligence and other abilities, including athleticism, is not fixed Essential that we show them we believe their intelligence and other abilities, including athleticism, is not fixed We need to make them believe they can improve We need to make them believe they can improve We need to ensure they know how to improve We need to ensure they know how to improve Collaborative community environment where campers take responsibility for their own learning Collaborative community environment where campers take responsibility for their own learning Campers understand the Growth Mindset and how it can help them in all of their efforts. Campers understand the Growth Mindset and how it can help them in all of their efforts.


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