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Ty Duncan, ESC 17 Senior Specialist. “I haven’t got the slightest idea how to change people, but I keep a long list of prospective candidates just in.

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Presentation on theme: "Ty Duncan, ESC 17 Senior Specialist. “I haven’t got the slightest idea how to change people, but I keep a long list of prospective candidates just in."— Presentation transcript:

1 Ty Duncan, ESC 17 Senior Specialist

2 “I haven’t got the slightest idea how to change people, but I keep a long list of prospective candidates just in case I should ever figure it out.” ---David Sedaris

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4  The Practice of Giving Students Zeroes – Number 1  The Practice of Combing Academic -- Performance with Citizenship and Work Habits – Number 2  The Practice of Giving Extra Credit – Number 3  The Practice of Averaging – Number 4 Becoming a Great High School, pgs 76-83, 2009

5 “Students must be invited to participate in determining the criteria by which their work will be judged, and then play a role in weighing their work against those criteria.” -- Alfie Kohn

6  What will the teacher give me on this?  What does the teacher want?  Why did I get this grade?  What can I do to improve this grade?  That grade/teacher/class is stupid. I don’t care.

7 The Bell Curve Norm-Referenced Tests e.g. ITBS, SAT, GRE, LSAT, Stat9, NAEP Purpose: To sort, select, classify, compare Information: How one compares with others Results: reported as percentile (%) rank Always yields a bell curve Assumes a non-aligned curriculum

8 % Demonstrating Skill Criterion-References Tests e.g. TExES, TAKS, license/ certification, teacher-made Purpose: To determine knowledge of defined criteria Information: How well an individual performs Results: Reported as % of criteria known Goal is to yield J curve Assumes an aligned curriculum Assumes most people can learn most things in time. Time The J Curve

9  Experience is NOT the best teacher  “If you do not have a theory to provide a framework to understand your experience, you do not accumulate 30 years of experience…”Myron Tribus  Just because you were graded on a bell curve doesn’t make it the best approach to teaching and learning today.

10  Turn to Page 13 in the Marzano book.  Number off at your table 1-4  Number 1 you read “The Imprecision of Assessments (pages 13-15)  Number 2 you read “Grading” (pages 15-16_  Number 3 you read “Norm-Referenced Grading” (pages 16-17)  Number 4 you read “Standards based Grading” (pages 17-19) You will teach this section to your table in 8 minutes.

11  He who gets the most right correctly after one exposure is the smartest and deserves the most credit.  Hard work!!  Effort!!  Determination!!  Perseverance!!  Turning work in on time!!! (He who doesn’t must not know the content)  70% -- If you know only 69% you must be a failure

12  Fair?  Equal?  Equitable?

13  Assessment of learning provides evidence of achievement  Assessment for learning serves to help students learn more Richard Stiggins

14 “Cramming does not provide meaningful information that remains in the brain as neural networks to which connections can be added…” Marilee Springer-Learning and Memory

15 Grades must be based on what students have learned, not what they have done. Behavioral issues must be separated from academic issues for grading purposes.

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17  Failure?  Laziness?  Lack of Content Understanding?  Perseverance?  Family Support?  Great Teaching?  Great Learning?  “Playing the Game”?  Memorizing? Pick one of these and make a case for it at your table.

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19 Rubric: A scoring system that allows teacher to place value on components of a given assessment product. States the criteria to be examined and assessed; Usually contains a scale (ex. 1-4) of different points possible per criterion; Provides students with expectations about what will be assessed and standards that need to be met; Increases consistency in the rating of student mastery; Provides students with “road signs” - information about where they are in relation to where they need to be.

20 “When you don’t get input it feels like school … When you do get input – it feels like learning.” George A., Student, Redding CA

21 Citizenship. The student understands the importance of voluntary individual participation in the democratic process. The student is expected to:  (A) explain the role of significant individuals such as Thomas Hooker, Charles de Montesquieu, John Locke, William Blackstone, and William Penn in the development of self-government in colonial America;  (B) evaluate the contributions of the Founding Fathers as models of civic virtue; and  Does a student who matches the people found in (a) on a worksheet deserve a hundred in the grade book?  How do you define FULL KNOWLEDGE of the student expectation above?

22 Student AStudent B HW HW Quiz HW HW Quiz HW HW Quiz Participation Unit Test Week Ave Quiz –daily grade; Test = 3 daily grades Ms. Smith’s 9 th Grade Algebra Class – 1 st 6 Weeks What do/should grades measure? How much of a role do/should attitude and effort play in a grade? What role does/should homework play? What is the purpose of a report card grade? Do/Should report card grades and TAKS scores be similar?

23  Many assignments are not as “objective” as teachers would like.  Rigorous work is going to take a change in the way we grade.  Grading a standard and not work takes increased teacher sophistication.

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25 Rubric: A scoring system that allows teacher to place value on components of a given assessment product. States the criteria to be examined and assessed; Usually contains a scale (ex. 1-4) of different points possible per criterion; Provides students with expectations about what will be assessed and standards that need to be met; Increases consistency in the rating of student mastery; Provides students with “road signs” - information about where they are in relation to where they need to be.

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27 Writing the Constitution : Performance Indicator 4 Evalua te 3 Analyz e 2 Compr e. 1 Know. Write a letter to the delegates meeting to discuss changing the Articles of Confederation. In the letter, summarize the strengths and weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and explain the issues that are evidence of the weak confederation. (8.15B; 8.29B) The letter evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the Articles and weighs them against each other in a sophisticated way that would persuade the delegates. The letter analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of the Articles and gives evidence for the delegates. The letter demonstrate s basic comprehensi on of the strengths and weaknesses, but does not summarize or give evidence to persuade delegates. The letter demonstrate s basic factual knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses but does not explain, summarize or give evidence to persuade delegates.

28 8.1.b8.2c8.4b8.5f8.7d8.7e4 Point Scale 100 Point Scale Ty Larry Tony Frank Oscar Kyle Average the 4 point scale and multiply by 25 to create the hundred point number for grade reporting. This also becomes your targeted intervention document for students who are failing to grasp the content. The learning is also not complete on this document as I would be willing to go back and change the grade if they demonstrated greater understanding during the six weeks.

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31 Truth In the Middle?

32  We can separate behavior from content!  We can measure the standard at the appropriate level of rigor and complexity!  We can begin utilizing rubrics and conversion scales to satisfy policy and ensure students are learning!  We can monitor individual student progress much like the chart system Marzano has on page in his book!  We can provide appropriate targeted interventions when students cannot meet the challenges of increased rigor in the classroom!  We can begin crucial conversations regarding student feedback and grading!


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