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Introductory Workshop https://engineering.purdue.edu/EPICSU

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1 Introductory Workshop https://engineering.purdue.edu/EPICSU
Welcome! https://engineering.purdue.edu/EPICSU

2 Dean Leah Jamieson Talking points for Leah

3 Workshop Overview Introductions EPICS Intro and overview
Course and curriculum Assessing student learning Administering EPICS Community Partnerships EPICS programs Building institutional support Overcoming barriers Sharing Plans

4 Introductions Name Affiliation What learn/motivation?

5 Introduction and Overview

6 Introduction and Overview: Outline
Motivation Context: engineering design, service learning EPICS Core values Example projects Integrating EPICS in the curriculum Links to research

7 motivation

8 Context: Educational Reform
Drivers for / reflectors of change: Accreditation (ABET EC 2000) Industry values Boeing “attributes of an engineer” National Academy of Engineering Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education Engineer of 2020 Changing the conversation Grand Challenges Carnegie Foundation Educating Engineers: Designing for the Future of the Field, Sheppard, Sullivan, Colby, Shulman, Macatangay Emphasize ABET which outcomes ---add slides that shows which outcomes a-k Boeing attributes from where Dulcy will provide references

9 Opportunities EPICS Engineering Grand Challenges
Professional skills development for students EPICS Fix formatting Local and global community needs University/college community engagement

10 Challenges: Limited Resources
Challenge: What to fund? Education and Industry or Needs of the underserved Compete for limited resources Needs of the Underserved Educational and Industrial Enterprises

11 Opportunities Needs of the underserved offer opportunities
Educational and Industrial Enterprises Needs of the Underserved Needs of the underserved offer opportunities Solutions improve lives of fellow citizens

12 The EPICS Partnership Service-Learning! Purdue University
Greater Lafayette Community Service-Learning!

13 Context: Learning Pedagogies
Active Learning Project Based Problem Based Inquiry Based Service-Learning Design Education

14 Characteristics of Service-Learning
Academically-based – tied to learning within an academic course. Service – students participate in service for the underserved in a community. Reciprocity – Mutual needs, mutual respect, mutual learning. Reflection (Analysis) – Students reflect (analyze) on their experience and learning. Have a conversation about “underserved” -- Brief S-L bibliography in binder, Tab 2

15 Research: Enhanced Learning
A similar phenomenon occurs when students are able to marshal a body of knowledge to solve problems presented in class but fail even to see a problem, much less the relevance of what has been learned, in a different setting. The new situation does not provide the cues associated with what has been learned; the “key words” from the classroom are not present in the wider environment. A service-learning student will have more ways to access this understanding. – Eyler and Giles Learners of all ages are more motivated when they can see the usefulness of what they are learning and when they can use that information to do something that has an impact on others – especially in their local community – Bransford et al., How People Learn Need a better slide to characterize service-learning!

16 Learning Design Design is messy The Design Process as a full cycle
Involving people The Design Process as a full cycle Phase are often skipped in traditional courses EPICS provides an opportunity for start-to-finish design Problem definition Design for x-ability Working designs for fielded projects Support for fielded projects Redesign for second generation systems Design Process Traditional Course

17 Why Community Projects?
Real projects: start-to-finish design – problem definition, specifications, version control, sustainability, design/coding standards, rigorous testing, reliability, maintainability, safety, satisfying a customer, accountability, pride When you are teaching design. These aspects are very difficult to teach in traditional courses. A different view of engineering and computing The university as citizen

18 Link to Research Summary included in the IJEE Paper (add details)
Learning Reported Teamwork, Communication, Leadership, Technical Skills, … Quotes from course evaluations “Other engineering courses only directly benefit me. EPICS benefits everyone involved.” “Working on this project has helped me guide the rest of my course work and ideas for a future profession.” “It made me understand how every aspect of engineering (design, implementation, team work, documentation) come together.” “No longer is engineering just a bunch of equations, now I see it as a means to help mankind.” “Opened my heart.” Present summary data from the paper (Coyle, Jamieson and Oakes, 2005) Table 2 Teamwork, Communication, Leadership main types of learning reported by students in EPICS

19 EPICS and Women Research on science education suggests that “context” is important to women students. NAE Changing the Conversation Report : “Because dreams need doing…” 20% of ECE & ME EPICS students are women, compared to 11% of ECE & ME students overall 33% of CS EPICS students vs. 11.5% in CS overall From Coyle, Jamieson and Oakes 2005

20 Check this data—update from Ford Impact: Students & Community
Student Retention – Purdue Participants retained at higher rates in engineering and computer science Community Awareness - National 77% of students indicate that EPICS had a positive impact on their awareness of the community Community Partners Survey - National 90% satisfied with partnership (10% neutral) 60% report increased understanding of engineering Rework this section—check Carla’s preserntation

21 Alumni Investigation (2011-2012)
528 alumni completed a survey and > 84% said EPICS contributed to their ability to: function in a team environment. work with people from very different disciplines. demonstrate leadership in a team environment.  Comments Included: “EPICS was a wake up call to the real world. Not only did it provide me with valuable experience, but it changed the way I viewed my education “Through EPICS I have learned how to listen to the needs of people and to try to use my skills to meet their needs.” “My rapid promotion is a direct result of the leadership skills gained through EPICS. I am now pursuing an MBA at an elite school, and I attribute it all to EPICS.” Alumni investigation

22 Core Values of EPICS Academic credit for
Long-term, team-based design projects Solving technology-based problems in the community Multi-year partnerships with not-for-profit community organizations to fulfill mutual needs: Significant design experiences for students Providing community organizations with access to technology-based solutions Community partners who assist the student teams Understand community needs Provide a meaningful context for design Work with the teams through definition, development, and deployment With no remuneration to the EPICS program Transition before this---introducing dissemination

23 Goals for EPICS Programs
Not-for-profit Project Partners Long-term Community Relationships Appropriate Projects Long-term Participation by Students Team Structure that Supports Continuity Multidisciplinary Teams Multidisciplinary Instructional Staff Highly Mentored Experience Social Context and Impact Local University Context Collaboration with Other EPICS Programs

24 EPICS Programs Integrating into Curricula
EPICS Curriculum Provides Service-Learning Design Education Project Management Community Partnerships Disciplinary Knowledge from Departments EPICS Programs Projects and Needs from Local/Global Community Institutional Curriculum and Culture

25 The EPICS Programs EPICS programs at 20 universities + 50 High School
Support from NSF, CNCS, Microsoft, HP, National Instruments, Cypress, Motorola, Purdue Workshops and conferences Regional workshops Multi-university EPICS projects Teams at different universities cooperate on wide scale problems Better slide in the Ford with Map. Substitute

26 EPICS Projects Access & Abilities Education & Outreach Human Services
Environment

27 Sample Projects: Human Services
Chemical sensing devices for local drug enforcement agencies and first responders Customized software solutions for not-for-profits or NGO’s FlashFood – app to link restaurants and community service organizations Habitat for Humanity Design of energy-efficient and sustainable homes in Indiana and Haiti Workshops for construction managers Disaster relief home designs

28 Projects: Environment
Campus and Neighborhood Sustainability Sensor networks to monitor pollution Water Resources Low Impact Development projects Water Filtration Projects for Developing Countries Constructed Wetlands Waiheke Island Waste Resource Trust, New Zealand Recycling & Sustainability ***Picture overlaps

29 Projects: Access & Abilities
Augmentative and Alternative Communication devices, including iPad app Therapeutic and education activities for children Devices to increase safety and efficiency of employees with disabilities Soap-box derby cars for kids with disabilities

30 Projects: Education and Outreach
Partnerships with local K-12 schools Interactive devices and software to enhance learning Museum/Zoo Projects: Interactive museum exhibits Animal friendly zoo designs Outreach Activities Space Day hands-on learning activities Environmental Education Electric vehicle activities for children

31 Projects: Human Services
Design chemical sensing equipment to help and protect local law enforcement in their work to inhibit drug making laboratories. The Habitat for Humanity team completed design of an energy efficient home using technologies that can be incorporated in standard home design.

32 Projects: Human Services

33 Projects: Environment
Boiler Green Initiative Rain Garden Green roof Alternative energy resources Wind turbine to recharge golf carts Water Resources Management Water conservation issues given local/global land use changes Global Alternative Power Systems Solar power system for Colombia

34 Projects: Access & Abilities
Communication and Educational apps for iPad Custom Prosthetic Soapbox Derby Car for kids w/ disabilities

35 Projects: Education K-12 outreach projects Local schools Museums
Purdue Space Day

36 Projects: Education Columbian Park Zoo Electric Vehicle
Design cart for race Outreach

37 Partnerships Finding Partners can be easy Campus resources
Challenge to start Flood of opportunities once get started Campus resources Others working with the community? Service-learning or volunteer office? Faculty colleagues Central organizations United Way Habitat for Humanity

38 Sample Partners Habitat for Humanity Campus/College Local government
Environmental or Parks services Regional gov’ts Area Schools Community centers Homeless shelters Research centers Red Cross Professional societies (IEEE) Engineering for Change (E4C) NGO’s Local ministry groups working locally and globally Local universities for global projects World Vision

39 Reflection/worksheet Question
What are the most compelling needs and significant strengths in your… Course(s) Department/unit College or University Community Table---initiatives vs. where does EPICS fit – share in small group/report out from some

40 EPICS has the potential to
Integrating the Curriculum innovation design resourcefulness ethics teamwork communication T I M E C O N T E X problem solving analysis engineering fundamentals science mathematics EPICS has the potential to realize new efficiencies in the engineering curriculum Cut this slide

41 What Makes EPICS Work? Close partnerships Long-term commitments
Alignment with academic and industry objectives Benefits to multiple stakeholders The idea: making a difference Keep/modify?

42 Reflection/worksheet Question
Which of the needs/issues listed in Question #2 could an EPICS or EPICS-style program help to address? Move to later in presentation

43 Course and Curriculum

44 Course and Curriculum: Outline
Purdue EPICS Course outcomes Semester view Milestones Reporting Course structure Labs, lectures, skills sessions Human-centered design Academic credit Roles Students, advisors, TAs Different Models at EPICS universities

45 EPICS Purdue Long-term partnerships with community organizations
Vertically-integrated teams: first-year+sophomores+juniors+seniors Extended design experience: academic credit throughout the student’s undergraduate career, 1-2 credits/semester Broadly multidisciplinary teams: across engineering and across campus… 70+ majors past two academic years Multidisciplinary instructional staff: ≈ 40 advisors from 8 departments and 4 companies Academic Year: Over 400 registered students each semester 31 “teams” or divisions ≈ 75 ongoing projects/semester

46 Time Scales: Traditional Courses
Student learning and project development are tied to academic calendar Semester/Quarter Student Learning Academic Calendar Project

47 EPICS Decouples Time Scales
Student Learning Semester/Quarter Semester/Quarter Semester/Quarter Project

48 EPICS Decouples Timescales
Student Learning Student Learning Semester/Quarter Semester/Quarter Semester/Quarter Project Project Community Receives Long-Term Support They Need

49 Human-Centered Design
Interactions with Community Communications at all stages

50 Managing the Decoupled Timescales
Student Learning Student Learning Semester/Quarter Semester/Quarter Semester/Quarter Project Project Curriculum and Assessment Goals: Facilitating and assessing the student learning for the semester Ensuring project continuity

51 EPICS Course Outcomes 1. Application from the discipline to the design of projects 2. Understanding of design as a start-to-finish process 3. Identification and acquisition of new knowledge 4. Awareness of the customer 5. Functioning on multidisciplinary teams contributions from other disciplines 6. Effective communication with different audiences 7. Awareness of professional ethics and responsibility 8. Understanding of role of discipline in social contexts i. applies material from their discipline to the design of community-based projects ii. demonstrates an understanding of design as a start-to-finish process iii. an ability to identify and acquire new knowledge as a part of the problem-solving/design process iv. demonstrates an awareness of the customer in engineering design v. demonstrates an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams and an appreciation for the contributions from individuals from other disciplines vi. demonstrates an ability to communicate effectively with audiences with widely-varying backgrounds vii. demonstrates an awareness of professional ethics and responsibility viii. demonstrates an appreciation of the role that their discipline can play in social contexts

52 Purdue EPICS Course Structure
EPICS Lab – Two hours/week Outside of lab work – 2 credits (5 hrs/wk) Learning Activities: Lectures Skill Sessions 1 credit = 5 2 credits = 10 Outside of lab work – 1 Credit (3.5 hrs/wk)

53 Student-led, Faculty-advised
Advisor TA Team Leader Project Leader Project Leader Project Leader Team members Team members Team members Team members Team members Team members Team members Team members Team members Team members

54 Milestone Highlights Slow Fast Delivery Deadline
Week 1 Transition and Integrating New Students Planning and setting expectations 2 3 4 5 Execute Semester Plans Deliver if Appropriate Document As You Go 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Complete semester commitments Transition to next semester Coordinate with Project Partner Focus on Project Partner and Transition 14 15 Finals Slow Fast Delivery Deadline

55 Spring 2013 Course Deliverables/Assignments
Due Date Team/ Individual Assignment Lab Safety Awareness form and Model Release form (for new students only) Week 2 (1/15-1/18) Individual Semester Plan Week 3 (1/22 – 1/25) Team Individual Evaluation Rubric Week 4 (1/29 – 2/1) Team Website Week 5 (2/5 – 2/8) Design Documentation (posted for reviewers with one page overview) Week 6 (2/12 – 2/15) Design Review Presentation Week 7 (2/19 – 2/22) Week 8 (2/26 – 3/1) Individual Documentation Peer Evaluation Project Evaluation Rubric Week 12 (4/2- 4/5)- Optional If delivering, Delivery Checklist Week 13/14 (4/8 – 4/19) Week 13 (4/9 – 4/12) Week 14 (4/16 – 4/19) Week 15 (4/23 – 4/26) Purdue Course Evaluations Final Reflection Lab and lecture attendance Weeks Current Website Weeks 5 and 14

56 Milestones Schedule Week (Dates) Objective(s) Strategies
Deliverable(s) Weeks 1 – 3 (1/9 – 1/27) Introductions: to each other, team, and projects Decide project teams and roles; team building within project team Learn about resources; confirm access Update myEPICS Learn about Project Partner: visit, observe, meet, understand Make sure on right track with planning, documenting, progress Complete Transition checklist within Project teams Complete Lab Safety Awareness form (new students) Plan PP visit Visit Project Partner: observe, meet, understand Complete drafts of semester plan, budget and Indiv Eval Rubric and get feedback, iterate. Get informal feedback on Individual Documentation Project Demos Lab Safety Awareness form (if new) Model release (if new) Informal review of individual accomplishments and documentation Semester Plan Week 4 (1/30-2/3) Approval of appropriate plan for the semester situated in overall timeline; Semester Plan and Budget included in Project Management portion of document. Semester Plan and Budget Approval of appropriate individual responsibilities that facilitate team plan Week 5 (2/6-2/10) Make progress on projects, and appropriately engage project partner Regularly update PP on status (e.g., , phone calls, visits); get frequent feedback from PP. Make effective use of lab time and frequently review requirements and semester plan. Documented in Individual and Project Documentation Week 6 (2/13-2/17) Update design documentation Determine aspects of project to review Prepare materials that enable design reviewers to prepare for design review Practice Design Review Presentation and get feedback Update Design Documentation; post to Sharepoint & relevant parts to secure site ( to Guy Martin) Design Documentation Week 7 (2/20-2/24) Effective communication of design and design decisions which facilitates quality feedback on design Design Review Presentatn Week 8 (2/27-3/2) Incorporate feedback from Design Reviews appropriately into design Mid-semester evaluation of both individual and project (individual and project grades) Complete Design Review Feedback Summary Individual and Project Documentation evaluated Complete Indiv and Proj Eval rubrics; Advisors/TA provide feedback in writing or verbally using grading guidelines Complete Peer evaluations in myEPICS Design Review Feedback Summary Indiv and Proj Eval Rubrics Peer Evaluation Individual Documentation

57 Milestones Schedule, cont.
Wks (3/5-4/6) Make progress on projects, and appropriately engage project partner To make sure on track Informal feedback to individuals if requested by student or required by advisor. Optional: Individual Eval Rubric Week 13 (4/9-4/13) To ensure successful delivery and continued usage of project Prepare for Design Review (see Week 6) Advisor/EPICS Admin Approvals needed before delivery Practice Design Review Presentation and get feedback Update Design Documentation; post to Sharepoint & relevant parts to secure site ( to Guy Martin) If delivering, Delivery Checklist Design Documentation Week 14 (4/16-4/20) Effective communication of design and design decisions which facilitates quality feedback on design Complete course evals in lab if time Design Review Presentatn Week 15 (4/25-4/29) Prepare for transition to next semester Critically reflect on learning this semester Final evaluation of individual and project Complete course evaluations Indiv and Proj Eval Rubrics Peer Evaluation Individual Documentation Final Reflection Course evaluations Weeks 1 - 15 Project Partner Communication: Incorporated into Sem Plan as appropriate ( correspondences, memos, working w/PP) Project Partner Satisfaction: Determined through formal and informal surveys by advisors/EPICS Wks Lab and Lecture Attendance Tracked in myEPICS Semester Current external web presence Webmaster has primary responsibility for website, but Project and Team Leaders need to contribute. Current Website

58 Lectures Need to meet needs of:
Both new and returning EPICS students Students from different levels and disciplines One and two-credit hour students Lectures occur in conjunction with doing (not prior) Most lectures videotaped to accommodate lecture conflicts (important for broad base, returning students) Lecture Schedule: See “Course and Curriculum” Tab

59 Lectures Introductory Lectures (5): New students Introduction to EPICS
Human-Centered Design Philosophy of Human-Centered Design Introduction to Design Tools and Resources Connecting design process to their project Ethics (and Social Responsibility) Critical/reflective thinking Lecture Schedule: See “Course and Curriculum” Tab

60 Lectures – Returning/ 2 credit Students-
Lecture Schedule: See “Course and Curriculum” Tab Professional Preparation Series Administrative: What’s new?, Resources, Assessment Sustainability Teamwork and Project Management Leadership Series (4 sessions) Oral and written communication (How to give effective design review, communicating with Project Partner) Community context Design tools: more in-depth look at tools

61 Skill Sessions Alternative/supplementary ways of earning lecture credit Interactive session to develop specific skills Often TA- and/or student-run sessions Examples: Specific programming skills & tools (Labview, Matlab, Object-oriented programming) Energy modeling Machine shop skills Ethics Community Need & Asset Assessment AutoCAD Solidworks Webmaster training Technical writing Disability awareness Soldering Carla will improve format

62 Human-Centered Design
Interactions with Community Communications at all stages

63 Human-centered Design: Basic Principles
Early focus on users Designing for and with users Empirical measurement and evaluation Iteration Who are the stakeholders? What information is important? What are effective ways to elicit information and communicate with stakeholders? How will you measure whether design goals are met? How and when are stakeholders involved in the process? Which ones are involved? See Gould and Lewis 63

64 Human Centered Design Formal/Informal Interviews Persona Scenarios
Focus groups– interviews with multiple people Persona Prototypical user, described in detail Scenarios “before and after” stories using your product Focus on the user’s need and how their life might be improved Role-playing: put yourself in the user’s shoes, chair, and/or space Empathic modeling: Simulating the sensory/ motor/ cognitive constraints

65 Prototypes Prototyping….rough, quick, very iterative
IDEO working with Gyrus ACMI to design new apparatus for operating on delicate nasal tissues Prototype:

66 Promoting Negotiation and Iteration
Representations promote feedback that promotes negotiation and appropriate iteration Visual – drawings, sketches, CAD Functional – mock up or prototype Intermediate or component Partial prototypes Community partners who do not have the answers They know when they “see” it

67 Design Documentation Provides a comprehensive and detailed description of the project design.  Intended audiences: New team members Reviewers,  advisors and TA's Ongoing team members Future team members Project Partner and other stakeholders Template organized by design process phases, most current in front Includes “project management” information (e.g., timeline, transition information, team members) Improve Tools and templates are provided, can be customized by advisors and students Pros cons of templates

68 Design Reviews Completed twice during the semester – Week 7 and Week 14/15 Take place during regularly scheduled lab time (110 minutes) EPICS invites externally reviewers who often review several teams during the day Teams invite reviewers who are relevant to project (e.g., someone with specific expertise, project partner, expert) Important for both student and project perspective Carla will modify

69 Reflection Encourage as part of regular practice
Weekly prompt questions during lab/lecture Critical approach to design Final reflection at the end of the semester: What did I learn? How did I learn it? Why does this learning matter? What will could I or others do in light of this learning? Source: Ash, S. L., Clayton, P. H., & Moses, M. G., Clayton. (2009). Learning through critical reflection: A tutorial for service-learning students (instructor version). (pp. 4-5 through 4-7)

70 Final Reflection, cont. Can be applied to the three areas below:
Personal and Professional Development Social Impact Academic Enhancement We ask them to apply to two of the three.

71 Ethics and Social Responsibility
Connecting ethics to design and need to be social responsible Professional responsibility Professional Codes of Ethics Need to consider more than just codes Ethical Frameworks Moral decision making process

72 Option: Textbook Readings and Reflections
Lima and Oakes “Service-Learning: Engineering in Your Community” Readings to supplement lectures Reflections on reading and lab work Targeted readings for team roles Leaders Partner liaisons

73 Student-led, Faculty-advised
Advisor TA Team Leader Project Leader Project Leader Project Leader Team members Team members Team members Team members Team members Team members Team members Team members Team members Team members

74 Team Roles: Students Team Leader/Co-Leaders
Project leaders - lead individual projects Liaison - primary contact for the community partner Financial officer - manages team’s budget Manager of Intellectual Property - leads entrepreneurship activities, patent searches Webmaster

75 Team Roles: Advisors Grading Faculty play key role
Advising teams in areas of expertise Academic credibility Industry advisors Non-faculty advisors with expertise Co-advisors from complementary disciplines Meet with team weekly Grading Hmmm—not sure about that statement: responsible for progress of team and individuals (oversees)

76 Team Roles: TAs Technical guidance to supplement background of advisors Administrative assistance for operation of program: one “administrative TA” assigned to each team Talent pool for all teams to tap Office hours Skills sessions Lab oversight Grading design notebooks, reflections, etc.

77 Roles: Administration
Program planning, development, management, and oversight Course management Community partner identification and selection; community relations Resource management (funds, labs, staff) Assessment and data collection Reporting

78 EPCS Courses EPCS 10100: First-Year Participation in EPICS (1 cr)
EPICS 10200: First-Year Participation in EPICS (2 crs) EPCS 20100: Sophomore Participation in EPICS (1 cr) EPICS 20200: Sophomore Participation in EPICS (2 crs) EPCS 30100: Junior Participation in EPICS (1 cr) EPCS 30200: Junior Participation in EPICS (2 crs) EPCS 40100: Senior Participation in EPICS (1 cr) EPCS 40200: Senior Participation in EPICS (2 crs) Senior Design: EPCS 41100: Senior Design Participation in EPICS (1 cr) EPCS 41200: Senior Design Participation in EPICS (2 crs) No pre-requisites, but instructor approval required for EPCS and 20200 Replace with James’ slide

79 Academic Credit / Plans of Study
EE: 3 cr senior design + 6 cr ECE elective ; 2 lab cr if not used as senior design CmpE: 3 cr senior design + 6 CmpE elective credits ME: 6 credits tech elective + 3 credits free elective CE and CEM: 3 credits tech elective IDE: 6 credits engineering/design + 3 senior design CS: CS elective + 3 senior design AAE: 3 credits as tech elective; additional AAE elective with permission LA: 3 credits count as core in Social Ethics CFS: fulfills specialization requirement in selected areas; elective for all areas Others: free elective credit Entrepreneurship Certificate: Option + Capstone modify

80 Other initiatives Core curriculum Engineering leadership

81 Another model: UCSD Mandy Bratton

82 Q 4 and 5.Are there current courses…
you’ve seen two examples…

83 Reflection/Worksheet Question
Q5. What are the student outcomes for my program/course(s)? Q6. Are there current courses or course structures that can be modified to integrate this model course or program? Yes  What modifications need to be made to the course(s)? No  What type of course(s) would be needed to meet these needs? Can one course be created to meet these needs or is a series of courses or program required? Use this course/these ideas in the rest of the exercise.

84 Reflection/worksheet Question
Q7. Does my proposed course/program satisfy the core values? Which goals does it incorporate now How do you see it evolving to incorporate other goals?

85 Begin Final Presentation Poster
University College Description – what are strengths, needs, drivers? What courses will be used? What potential project partners? Assets and needs of these organizations. What is overall outline for the poster? Lets give the outline for the poster and indicate what they need to do for day 1

86 Day 2 Announcements Final posters Lab tours Group photo

87 Assessing Student Learning in EPICS

88 Assessing Student Learning: Outline
What to assess Artifacts – data to assess Grading Senior Design Example

89 What to Assess Students are given academic credit for mastering course content, Not for the service they provide for the community Students are therefore assessed on their demonstrated mastery of course content

90 EPICS Course Outcomes 1. Application from the discipline to the design of projects 2. Understanding of design as a start-to-finish process 3. Identification and acquisition of new knowledge 4. Awareness of the customer in engineering design 5. Functioning on multidisciplinary teams contributions from other disciplines 6. Effective communication with different audiences 7. Awareness of professional ethics and responsibility 8. Understanding of role of discipline in social contexts i. applies material from their discipline to the design of community-based projects ii. demonstrates an understanding of design as a start-to-finish process iii. an ability to identify and acquire new knowledge as a part of the problem-solving/design process iv. demonstrates an awareness of the customer in engineering design v. demonstrates an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams and an appreciation for the contributions from individuals from other disciplines vi. demonstrates an ability to communicate effectively with audiences with widely-varying backgrounds vii. demonstrates an awareness of professional ethics and responsibility viii. demonstrates an appreciation of the role that their discipline can play in social contexts

91 Multidisciplinary Assessments
EPICS projects require multidisciplinary approaches Assessing students from different areas requires their own learning objectives in their “own language” Freshman vs. senior One vs. two credits Engineering vs. other majors Important to be specific about expectations and outcomes Convey expectations early and throughout semester James has graphic

92 Spring 2013 Course Deliverables/Assignments
Due Date Team/ Individual Assignment Lab Safety Awareness form and Model Release form (for new students only) Week 2 (1/15-1/18) Individual Semester Plan Week 3 (1/22 – 1/25) Team Individual Evaluation Rubric Week 4 (1/29 – 2/1) Team Website Week 5 (2/5 – 2/8) Design Documentation (posted for reviewers with one page overview) Week 6 (2/12 – 2/15) Design Review Presentation Week 7 (2/19 – 2/22) Week 8 (2/26 – 3/1) Individual Documentation Peer Evaluation Project Evaluation Rubric Week 12 (4/2- 4/5)- Optional If delivering, Delivery Checklist Week 13/14 (4/8 – 4/19) Week 13 (4/9 – 4/12) Week 14 (4/16 – 4/19) Week 15 (4/23 – 4/26) Purdue Course Evaluations Final Reflection Lab and lecture attendance Weeks Current Website Weeks 5 and 14 Refer to handout Not tied to specific phases of the design process. Appropriate for phases of design. This provides structure that students understand. Ensure that students understand expectations

93 Project Artifacts Project
Project Artifacts (prototypes, demos, completed projects, etc) Design Documentation Design Review Presentations Project Partner Communications (presentations, meetings, memos, feedback, etc) Project Evaluation Rubric: provides summary and self-evaluation of project plan and accomplishments

94 Individual Artifacts Individual Notebook, blog, other posted work
Final Reflection Peer Evaluation/ Feedback: both your evaluation to others and others evaluation of you Participation (lab, project team, and lecture) Individual Evaluation Rubric : provides summary and self-evaluation of work completed and planned

95 Grading Summary Students’ work in EPICS is assessed based on five evaluation criteria: Accomplishments Process Critical Thinking Teamwork/Leadership Communication See Grading Guidelines in Assessment section

96 Individual Grade Quality and quantity of documented
Individual accomplishments Learning and skill development Team’s accomplishments. Juniors/Seniors must show initiative for an A First-year/Sophomores can get an A following and meeting expectations

97 Example Grading Guideline
A junior/senior student who receives a grade of A in EPICS must exceed overall expectations and demonstrate and document excellent achievement in each of the following areas: Accomplishments: Responsibilities associated with project work are appropriate, but ambitious for junior/senior course level, major, semester in EPICS, and number of credits. Individual contributions to and/or ideas about the project are excellent and has a significant impact on design and/or deliverables. Excellent understanding of relevant discipline-specific issues related to the project. All work is documented, and significant contributions related to the project are incorporated into the digitally archived design documentation. Process: Demonstrates and documents an excellent understanding of the processes inherent in design and an ability to employ these processes in the development of the project. Replace with Dulcy’s slides—she will send them

98 Example Grading Guideline, cont.
Reflective/Critical Thinking: Demonstrates and documents an ability to think critically about many of the disciplinary, social, ethical, personal, and interpersonal aspects of the project, project partner, and their relationships. Teamwork/Leadership: If applicable, puts forth excellent effort to fulfill responsibilities associated with team position. Demonstrates initiative and excellent participation in class and group work. Shows a willingness to work with other team members, within and/or outside of formal team roles, to accomplish team goals and leads when appropriate. Promotes team unity. Excellent attendance. Assists others to learn new skills. Communication: Communicates very effectively both written and orally, formally and informally, to all audiences: people familiar with project, and those who are not; people with both similar and different backgrounds; to teammates and to external people; to those who will be asked to continue your project in the future.

99 Individual Evaluation Rubric
Contribution/Learning (e.g., completed user analysis, data analysis, DFMEA, or prototype, programmed microprocessor; learned CATIA) Where documentation can be found: (include page #s if in notebook and URLs if online) Accomplishments Process Critical thinking Teamwork/ leadership Communication In the following box, list contributions and learning planned for rest of semester Contribution/Learning: To be completed by: ( ex: 9/20/11)

100 Individual Evaluation Rubric
Directions: Students mark an “X” and Advisors/TAs mark an “O” in the appropriate box for each criterion. Each of the criterion should be evaluated considering the student’s course level, major, semester in EPICS, and number of credits. Excellent Good Adequate Low passing A+ A A- B+ B B- C+ C C- D+ D D- F Accomplishments: Individual contributions to the project and impact on design and/or deliverables. Understanding of relevant discipline-specific issues related to the project. Documentation of individual work and incorporation into project documentation. Process: Documented understanding the processes inherent in design and an ability to employ these processes in the development of the project. Reflective/Critical Thinking: Demonstrates ability to think critically about many of the disciplinary, social, ethical, personal, and interpersonal aspects of the project, project partner, and their relationships. Teamwork/Leadership: Initiative and participation in class and group work. Works with and helps other team members, within and/or outside of formal team roles, to accomplish team goals. Lab and project meeting attendance. If applicable, leadership and fulfillment of responsibilities associated with team position. Communication: Written and oral communication, both formally and informally, to all audiences: people familiar with project, and those who are not; people with both similar and different backgrounds; to teammates and to external people; to those who will be asked to continue your project in the future.

101 Individual Evaluation Rubric, cont.
Students: Overall grade you believe you have earned to this point in the semester: _____ Why? Please include specific examples of “Excellent”, “Good”, “Adequate”, or “Low Passing” (whichever corresponds to the grade you have given yourself) Accomplishments, Process, Reflective Thinking, Teamwork/ Leadership and/or Communication in the box below. Please also include any additional information that was not reflected in the evidence you provided. Advisors/TA: Grade earned to this point in the semester: ____________________ Explanation for grade (in box):

102 Setting Expectations Teams set semester goals through project semester plan By weeks 2- 4, depending if new/returning Advisor (instructor) approves plan Students set individual goals and role(s) for each semester by weeks 2 - 4 Align with Project Semester Plan Advisor (instructor) approves goals/roles Self- and Advisor Assessment of accomplishments at weeks 4 (informal), 8, 12 (optional), and final ****not done editing

103 Mid semester Grading All resources and artifacts evaluated
Self assessments evaluated Students provided with a team and individual grade or range and comments What would they have to do to improve? Feedback often provided in individual meetings with students Calibrates students and faculty Problems can be identified early Need for documentation reinforced

104 Final Grading Repeat process for mid-semester grades
Final self-assessment Use mid-semester evaluations as a basis Students addressed concerns over the last half of the semester? Emphasis on documentation Do the artifacts represent their level of work? Some advisors provide students with comments and/or conduct exit interviews

105 ABET, Senior Design and EPICS
EPICS projects are well-matched to the ABET criteria. Customer-driven service-learning means that each team has a different project and that each student may have a different role on the team. This variability requires procedures for assessment, tracking, and documentation of projects and of student outcomes. Link with a-k See “Capstone Course” tab

106 Senior Design and EPICS
Senior Design option for ECE, IDE and CS students (currently) At least three credits over two semesters of EPICS Documents used track progress/completion Project Proposal Individual document that provides early feedback on project appropriateness (Significant design experience on a suitable project) Outcomes Matrix Individual document that demonstrates all outcomes were met over the two semester experience Project Description Common document used by ECE, adopted by other departments, to describe how project teams have met outcomes

107 Project Approval Project Description:
Team & project name Project members, majors, expertise Project & customer summary How builds on disciplinary courses New technical knowledge acquired Multidisciplinary nature How project involves professional component (criterion 4) constraints One form per project w/ senior design students per semester Approved by team advisor Reviewed by EPICS administrators, and for ECE, ECE Senior Design committee

108 Outcomes Certification
Documenting Outcomes: Deliverables Design notebook Design reviews Reports Presentations Weekly reports Customer feedback Peer evaluation Self assessment

109 Outcomes Certification
Outcomes record maintained by students Contributions listed as completed Reviewed by TAs and team advisor Semester-end and year-end review by EPICS administration EPICS Admin support for advisors not from senior design major See examples of Outcome Matrices and Project Descriptions in “Capstone Course” tab.

110 Another perspective Victoria Dorman - Princeton

111 Reflection/worksheet Question
Q9. How will you assess student outcomes and course content? What existing materials or process are in place to use? What new materials or processes are needed? Q10. How will grades be assigned? ****Not sure about doing Question #5 here…….

112 Research-informed Assessment
Introduction to Carla and James research. What we are teaching is based on doing but also on research…. Research informs the way we make changes to enhance the deliver in EPICS (and other courses)

113 James Huff Alumni Study

114 Design, Ethics , Service-learning???
Other research

115 Outcome Space of Students’ Experience of Human-Centered Design
Two dimensional space 5 categories were hierarchical Two were distinct

116 Outcome Space of Students’ Experience of Human-Centered Design
Immersive “Critical” Seven categories of description formed an outcome space that was two-dimensional, distinct, but not independent axes. Suggest a number of things. Both design and “understanding of the users” aspect reflected in experiences. Development of both are related. Both are needed in development of more comprehensive way of understanding HCD Categories of description define more comprehensive ways. The defines not only what it means to have a more comprehensive ways, but what are the typical pathways. Categories which emerged reflected aspects of needing to overcome certain threshold concepts. Implications for tech and service, but also in other categories related to transformative experiences. Results suggest that critical or immersive experiences involving real clients and users were important in allowing the students to experience human-centered design in more comprehensive ways. All students in “Commitment” had critical experience. Sejal’s wake-up call All students in “Empathic Design” had immersive experiences Rapid prototyping experience Assessment trip to developing country

117 Building Long-Term Community Partnerships

118 Selecting Community Partners
Criteria for selecting community Project Partners: Project partner commitment to work with students Significance - greatest benefit to the community Level of technology - challenging but within the capabilities of undergraduates Expected duration - a mix of short and long-term projects Match with student and advisor population Criteria for selecting community Project Partners: Project partner commitment – commitment of individuals in the partner organizations to work with students Significance - partners whose projects should provide the greatest benefit to the community Level of technology - projects challenging to, but within the capabilities of, engineering undergraduates Expected duration - a mix of short- (one semester to one year) and long-term (multi-year) projects Match with student and advisor population

119 Working with Community Partners
Setting expectations from the outset Interactions/expectations between you and partners Interactions/expectations between students and partners Single point of contact with community organizations – “project partner liaison” Follow up regularly Assess partners’ experience: Feedback on students and program Memorandum of understanding

120 Sustained Partnerships
Value for community organizations Not-for-profit staffs are stretched Creating partnerships takes resources Communities need payback on investment Value for EPICS faculty and staff Not starting over each semester Easier to manage Value for students Long-term projects Curricular thread Extended community engagement

121 Local and Global Opportunities
Complementary opportunities Compelling needs to learn and apply knowledge to designs Connecting disciplines (engineering) with needs of people Local projects Pedagogical advantage to teach design with frequent interactions with users Affordable with low/no transportation $ Local benefits seen by campus and community Seeing needs everywhere (here) ***picture overlaps

122 Local and Global Opportunities
Compelling needs on larger scales Higher interest among students and funders Easier for students to see? Global experiences and competencies Partnerships and Sustainability Partner with local universities EPICS global, local universities providing links and support Joint project opportunities, domestically and globally Needs work

123 Partner Profiles Greater Lafayette Area Special Services Cooperative

124 Partner Profiles Indianapolis Children’s Museum

125 Habitat for Humanity

126 Another perspective Mandy Bratton - UCSD

127 Administering EPICS

128 Administering EPICS: Outline
EPICS Purdue Organization Administrative Structures and Processes: Students Instructional staff Community partners & projects Funds for project expenses Labs & infrastructure Space Curricular and programmatic Risk management Corporate and development Budgets Organization structures and processes to support EPICS

129 Early EPICS Organization
Department Co-Directors (faculty) Part-Time Lab Manager Program Coordinator ****should we keep “Advisory Council” ???? -- not currently active, but has been a part in the past. A Head TA Faculty & Industry Advisors Lab UGTAs Community Partners Student Issues TAs

130 EPICS Organization Dean of Engineering Advisory Council Curriculum
Committee Director William Oakes Academic Administrator Lab Manager Program Coordinator ****should we keep “Advisory Council” ???? -- not currently active, but has been a part in the past. CHANGE this slide Head TA Faculty & Industry Advisors Lab UGTAs Community Partners Office staff TAs

131 EPICS Organization Dean of Engineering Advisory Council Curriculum
Committee Co-Director Carla Zoltowski Director William Oakes Global Initiatives Dulcy Abraham Lab Manager (as of 7/1) Program Coordinator Pam Brown ****should we keep “Advisory Council” ???? -- not currently active, but has been a part in the past. Faculty & Industry Advisors Head TA Lab UGTAs Community Partners Office staff TAs

132 Administration: Students
Recruiting Academic advisors and faculty Classes Webpage Registration “Schedule deputy” Student assistance with registration problems Manage team enrollments Student Ambassadors Course evaluations (University system) Grade submission Student scholarship and awards

133 Administration: Instructional Staff
TAs based on student enrollment and disciplines/expertise needed by the teams EE, CmpE, CS, ME, CE, Sociology, Education TAs funded through departments and by EPICS Started as matches from grants, migrated to institutional support, based on enrollment formula Advisors assigned by departments, in consultation with EPICS administration Matches from grants => institutional support Negotiated teaching credit based on parity with other design courses 1 team for 1AY = 1 traditional semester course Conduct TA and Advisor training/development workshops

134 Administration: Community Partners & Projects
Community partner identification and selection Web form that potential partners can complete Hold Harmless and checks needed for partner Community relations and managing partnerships Celebration of partnerships (“Partnership Dinner”) Delivery process Delivery checklist Customer Satisfaction survey “I made a difference” T-shirts for team Sample forms on the EPICS website and notebook

135 Administration: Funds for Project Expenses
Real projects are done for not-for-profits at no cost to the partners Requires funding for materials Sponsorships of teams for supplies ~$2000 per team Currently have corporate sponsors for 10 teams ($5000/year) Larger expenses from outside funding E.g., Habitat for Humanity home, wetland, deployed homelessness network, classroom furniture

136 Labs & Infrastructure Equipment and space needed to design, develop and assemble projects Computer/server resources Construction facilities Light machining, instrumentation and assembly space Machine shop Computer infrastructure to manage teams and students Management of accounts, licenses, etc. Safety certifications Equipment funded at Purdue by: EPICS share of lab fees & engineering tuition differential Grants and industry donations

137 Administration: Space
Administrative space Coordinator, lab manager, TAs, UGTAs to help Lab space for students to develop and build projects Managing access Meeting rooms Not traditional classrooms Storage Equipment Projects in assembly and those returned from the field for repair and/or redesign

138 Administration: Curricular and Programmatic
Management of EPICS Curriculum committee Working with curriculum committees of schools, departments, etc. to include in curriculum and determining “how it counts” Collection of metrics Reporting requirements

139 Administration: Risk Management
Protocols with community partners, the university, and students Hold harmless agreements with community partners Confidentiality agreements Human subjects / IRB review Student activities off campus Background checks Photo/video permissions Lab safety forms Sample forms on the EPICS website and notebook

140 Administration: Corporate and Development
Management of design reviews Working with development staff to identify potential donors/funding agencies Writing grant proposals Writing stewardship reports Publicity/visibility

141 Annual Expenses - Purdue EPICS
Parameters: 30 teams, ~400 students 3 teams per 1/2-time TA, 1 TA per team Faculty and lab equipment expenses not included Expenses ($) Source Directors 75,000 College Staff 220,000 Provost, College TAs 260,000 Depts, Provost Team expenses 45,000 Corporate gifts, Instructional funds Operations 25,000 Instructional funds, gifts Total $625,000 $1562/student

142 Example Budget Annual Expense Basis Example: Faculty Director
6 teams 72 students 25% director .5 FTE staff, 2 TAs Faculty Director 25-50% AY support 1 month summer $27K Professional Administrative Staff .5 to 1.0 $72K loaded salary $25K TAs One 50% TA/3 teams $52K Team expenses $2K/team $12K Operations $500/team $3K Total $119K $1652/student

143 Chris Butler – UC Merced
Another perspective Chris Butler – UC Merced

144 Reflection/worksheet Question
Q11. What administrative aspects will you be able to manage with current faculty and staff? What additional resources will you need to seek? ****Not sure about doing Question #5 here…….

145 Building Institutional Support

146 Building Institutional Support
Barriers and enablers on each campus What are they for your campus? What will each stakeholder gain from your EPICS program? (last question on the worksheets) Use the institutional processes e.g. curriculum committees for accountability Short cuts may undermine your efforts

147 Institutionalizing Look for enablers or other initiatives that can help your efforts Entrepreneurship Diversity or retention efforts Accreditation Cross-disciplinary efforts Global Engagement and outreach Participate and be part of the campus Get in media and university/college talking points

148 Institutionalizing Identify advocates Research
Corporate partners and advocates Community Administrative Senior/respected faculty Key disciplines Research Education and outreach components for large grants and centers Early career faculty NSF CAREER Awards

149 Purdue Experience: Challenges
Creating new curriculum structures to support long-term projects: multi-semester, multi-class, multi-disciplinary Understanding community partnerships Developing protocols for off-campus projects and liability Evaluating and documenting student outcomes Valuing “professional” skills Achieving multi-disciplinarity Becoming “sustainable” with funding Space as we (and the projects) have grown Technological Sandbox

150 Barriers: Academic Issues
Emphasis on “professional” (i.e., “soft”) skills Be fluent with the “literature”: Engineering Dean’s Council report, ABET, Boeing, NAE, NSF Be rigorous in technical requirements Be rigorous in documentation and assessment Recruit respected faculty Enlist corporate advocates Be successful: NSF grants, papers (including papers in the discipline), corporate gifts, key alums Track your successful students Create communication channels to address concerns: EPICS curriculum committee, Advisory Council

151 Barriers: Academic Issues
Projects originating in the community (v.s. designed by engineers) Develop criteria for suitable projects Communicate with the community partner Include educational requirements Refer academically unsuitable projects to a more appropriate organization Show off outstanding projects Break down the semester barrier Start small and build

152 Barriers: Academic Issues
New academic structures: vertical teams, repeat registration, multi-year projects Lots of conversations with the registrar and academic counselors New course numbers that can be repeated Team dynamics, formal team transition and mentoring Emphasis on documentation

153 Barriers: Academic Issues
Multidisciplinary projects and teams Lots of conversations with Deans and Heads Meetings with curriculum committees to establish credit in departments Opportunity for college outcomes and core requirements Faculty and TAs from diverse disciplines Industry advisors Team tools to foster respect for diverse team members Faculty and TA training

154 Barriers Peer pressure: It’s not research …

155 Practical Strategies Articulate the benefits, starting with learning objectives and outcomes Participate in engagement/outreach activities “Money talks”: bring in government grants and corporate gifts Enlist corporate advocates Enlist community advocates Assess with rigor It’s academia: publish in education and discipline-specific venues … Be successful

156 Another perspective Eric Baumgartner- Ohio Northern

157 Adapting to Local Institutional Culture A faculty perspective

158

159 My Background Professor in Civil Engineering/ Construction Engineering and Management Research interests in infrastructure renewal  a life-cycle approach Link with EPICS  alignment with my passions as an educator  realms of learning, research and broader engagement with stakeholders – nationally and internationally “Giving much, gaining more” Add what you want to say about yourself

160 Engaging Faculty - Teaching Credit
EPICS counts as teaching credit in many departments ½ a course based on the lower credit hours for EPICS Some do it as overload Engaged in other things they don’t want to give up Teaching credit is good but assigned faculty can be a problem Negotiate with departments who is assigned Faculty need incentivies. One way is teaching credit. EPICS at Purdue counts as ½ a course, which is about right based on student/credit hours. Many still do it as an overload as they don’t get out of things because they don’t want to stop other things. It should be mentioned that assigning faculty to the course doesn’t always work if they don’t want to be there.

161 Engaging Faculty Connecting with broader interests
Global and local projects Interested in combining global interest and course structure Future faculty development Integrating with other interests Some use EPICS as a way to connect teaching with their own community interests Faculty need incentives and sometimes it is their own interests. The global thing is what got you involved at first. Others look at this as something they are interested in, based on where they volunteer or have kids.

162 Connecting with research
EPICS projects that align with research Image processing Chemical sensor development Water quality Education and outreach components for research grants NSF CAREER Awards Biomedical outreach – interactive cell demonstrations for museums Nano-technology outreach Electric vehicle battery development Earthquake center Purdue research is king (or queen) and connecting it to research is important and a way to engage faculty. Some EPICS projects involve research areas while others are education and outreach components added to proposals.

163 Adapting to faculty cultures
Purdue’s EPICS Program is designed to allow faculty focus on the project and students Making it look close to a more traditional design course Provide curriculum and assessment materials Select and manage the partnerships with the community Graduate teaching assistants help with the teams and grading Follows pattern for other classes at our campus EPICS is designed to make it as easy as possible for faculty, as close to a traditional course as possible. Purdue faculty are not usually asked to do a lot of grading and TA’s are assigned to do that. I intended to talk about how our faculty culture places constraints on us and influences how we design our program.

164 Another perspecive Tom Jacobius IIT

165 Reflection Question Question #8
What institutional cultural issues need to be considered to implement EPICS? What are the typical teaching loads? What support is typical provided for teaching? What connections could be made to encourage faculty to participate?

166 Complete Poster for Final Session
Who are possible community partners? Describe potential project(s) Questions? Barriers?

167 Raising Funds for Your Program
Fundraising EPICS: Raising Funds for Your Program

168 Basic Fundraising Overview
Types of support Grants/sponsored programs Corporate Foundations Individuals Forms of support Funding Gifts in Kind Partnerships

169 Basic Fundraising Overview
Who is responsible for fundraising for your program? YOU! Development/University Relations Dean Faculty Staff Students Advisory Board

170 Basic Fundraising Overview
Donor Lifecycle Build, maintain and enhance relationships! Identification / Qualification Cultivation Stewardship Solicitation

171 Basic Fundraising Overview
So, how do you get started? It’s all about building and maintaining relationships. Internal champions External champions Make connections

172 Getting Down to the Details
Building and maintaining relationships: Think about the four I’s… Information develops interest. Interest leads to involvement which you hope will turn into investment. And the fifth I is Impact. Show what Impact your program has – on the student, on the community, on the university, on the world!

173 Engaging Partners Remember the four I’s… Information Press releases
Newsletter Annual fund letter Website

174 Building Support…the four I’s…
Interest Take advantage of interest; listen to the partner to understand their motivation

175 Building Support…the four I’s…
Involvement Design reviews Lecture guest speakers Advisory boards Skill Sessions Advisors for teams

176 Building Support…the four I’s…
Investment Projects, infrastructure Research Aligns with philanthropic interests

177 Future Partners Alumni (future alumni) Treat as potential partners
Keep informed Opportunities Program status Successes Talk about newsletter, success recruiting alumni to design reviews, idea for upcoming campaign

178 Corporate Funding Work with Corporate Relations and Development staff at your institution. Remember the four I’s… Funding templates Many companies support service-learning and engineering Share contacts and look for commonality Corporations partner with specific campuses

179 EPICS at Purdue – types of sponsorships
Team sponsorship- $5,000 for one academic year. Covers materials and supplies, administrative costs and TA support.

180 EPICS at Purdue – types of sponsorships
Special projects, i.e. Habitat for Humanity- energy efficient house sponsored by Ford Motor Company Fund.

181 Foundation Funding Foundation Center; www.foundationcenter.org
Pick up the phone! Foundations who fund STEM education or service-learning EPICS successes: Motorola Solutions Foundation Ford College Community Challenge Google RISE Foundation Go to Foundation Center website. Demonstrate 990 finder. Discuss prospect worksheet.

182 Grants NSF Department of Education TUES program STEP
Type 1 – individual institution, May Type 2 and 3 – January STEP Education and outreach for research Department of Education

183 Stewardship Don’t forget the fifth I!!! Impact
Did you do what you said you would? Stewardship reports Keep informed Opportunities – corporate partnerships Program status Successes and challenges Set a baseline for communication with sponsors, minimum once a year. Be sure to be open about challenges and set backs. Funders would prefer an honest update to silence.

184 Summary Need a team approach to fundraising
Define processes and identify resources Get on the lists of opportunities for your institution Different appeal to donors Avoid “zero sum” mentality Open new sources of funding Demonstrate impact!

185 Deleted slides

186 Grading Summary, cont. Student work is considered at both the Project and Individual level.  The following artifacts will be used for assessment at the different levels. Project Project Artifacts (prototypes, demos, completed projects, etc) Design Documentation Design Review Presentations Project Partner Communications (presentations, meetings, memos, feedback, etc) Project Evaluation Rubric: provides summary and self-evalutaion of project plan and accomplishments Individual Notebook, blog, other posted work Final Reflection Peer Evaluation/Feedback: both your evaluation to others and others evaluation of you Participation (lab, project team, and lecture) Individual Evaluation Rubric : provides summary and self-evaluation of work completed and planned

187 Service-Learning Definition
We define service learning as a type of experiential education in which students participate in service in the community and reflect on their involvement in such a way as to gain further understanding of course content and of the discipline and its relationship to social needs and an enhanced sense of civic responsibility. - Hatcher and Bringle, 1997

188 Partnerships: Outline
Why partner? Community partners Multidisciplinarity Corporate partners Entrepreneurship Intra-EPICS partnerships

189 EPICS Course Structure
Lab Team meeting Working on project Mentoring by advisor, TA and students Learning by Doing Outside Work 1 credit = 3.5 hours outside work/week (lecture) 2 credit = 5 hours outside work/week Lecture 1 credit = 5 “lectures” 2 credit = 10 “lectures” 5 Introductory lectures New students Design Process/Ethics Homework readings/reflections Choose additional lectures Professional development topics Skill sessions/Workshops Advisor approved activities


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