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From Greek “Arthro-jointed”, “podis”-feet Segmented body. Paired segmented appendages. Chitinous exoskeleton. Open circulatory system, a tubular dorsal.

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Presentation on theme: "From Greek “Arthro-jointed”, “podis”-feet Segmented body. Paired segmented appendages. Chitinous exoskeleton. Open circulatory system, a tubular dorsal."— Presentation transcript:

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2 From Greek “Arthro-jointed”, “podis”-feet Segmented body. Paired segmented appendages. Chitinous exoskeleton. Open circulatory system, a tubular dorsal blood vessel. Striated muscles in skeletal system. Respiration by gills, tracheae, or spiracle.

3 Insects (winged arthropods) Arachnids (spiders, ticks, mites, etc.) Crustaceans (isopods, crabs, lobsters) Millipedes Centipedes Phylum Arthropoda Sod Webworm Moth, Crambus sp. Cottonwood Leaf Beetle, Chrysomela scripta CUES,

4 Crayfish Two main body sections. Five to seven pairs of legs. Two pairs of antennae. Simple eyes. Gills O.F.A.H.

5 Class Crustacea: Crabs, lobsters, sowbugs Pillbugs are land dwelling crustaceans complete with gills, that’s why they stay in humid areas under rocks!

6 One pair of legs per body segment. Flattened body. First pair of legs modified as venomous fangs. Nocturnal predators. Few are dangerous to humans. Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Garden Centipede, Lithobius forficatus

7 Class Chilopoda: Centipedes Georgia Forestry Commission Archives Georgia Forestry Commission Fangs of Scolopendrid Centipede (above) House Centipede, Scutigera coleoptrata (right) Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

8 Two pairs of legs per body segment. Cylindrical body. Rounded appearance Feed on decaying plant material. Herbivorous Nocturnal. Harmless. Emily G. Tenczar Pet African Giant Millipedes

9 Class Diplopoda: Millipedes Photos by William Leonard, Tree of Life Web Project,

10 Class Arachnida: Spiders, ticks, mites, harvestman, scorpions, pseudoscorpions etc. Yellow Garden Spider Tick Mite Pseudoscorpion

11 Mouthparts are called chelicerae. Most contain venom. Antennae are absent. Four pairs of legs. 1 to 2 body segments. Blacklegged Tick, Ixodes scapularis Ronald F. Billings Texas Forest Service Yellow Garden Spider, Argiope aurantia Scott Bauer, USDA Agricultural Research Service,

12 Two body regions (cephalothorax, abdomen). Fangs (chelicerae), most are venomous. Most are not dangerous. Most make webs. Most have poor eyesight; hairs compensate for it (jumping spiders are an exception). Potentially dangerous spiders (bites are uncommon): Brown recluse spider, Black widow spider Class Arachnida: Order Araneae: Spiders David Cappaert, Jumping Spider, Phidippus audax

13 Mites have only one noticeable body region. Many are microscopic or close to it. Class Arachnida: Order Acari: Mites

14 One apparent body region. Abdomen and cephalothorax short. Common and harmless. Nocturnal. Feed on detritus, fruit, or other animals. Class Arachnida: Order Opiliones: Harvestman (Daddy Longlegs) Leiobunum sp. Joseph Berger,

15 Class Arachnida: Order Pseudoscorpiones  One apparent body segment  Looks like scorpion without tail  Very small soil dweller  Pedipalps or pinchers resemble those of scorpions  Source of venom  Harmless predators of soil insects Notice Size

16 Six legs Protruding mouthparts, unlike non-insect hexapods. Most have wings. Milkweed Leaf Beetle, Labidomera clivicollis David Cappaert,

17 Small- Soil dwelling. Furcula or fork-like springing structures. Simple eyes. Antennae. Wingless adults. Compact body Feed on decomposing materials. *Class Entognatha: Order Collembola: Springtails David R. Maddison, Tree of Life Web Project

18 Class Insecta: Order Coleoptera: Beetles Japanese Beetle, Popillia japonica, Adult (left) and Scarab Larva (below)

19 Class Insecta: Order Coleoptera: Beetles Hardened forewings (elytra). Elytra divided evenly down the back Winged adults. Chewing mouthparts. Elytra Note elytra division pattern like a “T” shape

20 Class Insecta: Order Hemiptera: True bugs Aphids, whiteflies, scales, Cicadas, hoppers Piercing/Sucking mouthparts. Usually winged adults. Wings criss-cross against back, form an hour-glass outline. Nymphs and adults similar in appearance.

21 Class Insecta: Order Hemiptera: Suborder Heteroptera: True bugs Most bugs feed on plants. Some are predaceous. Predaceous Stink Bug attacking caterpillar Fourlined Plant Bug, Poecilocapsus lineatus CUES CUES, Note “X” to hour glass shape of back and elytra

22 Class Insecta: Order Thysanura: Silverfish Three tail-like appendages. Body flattened and covered with scales (like butterflies) Wingless adults. Three tails (fillaments) Found in wet places. Lepisma saccharina Clemson University - USDA Cooperative Extension Slide Series

23 Class Insecta: Order Dermaptera: Earwigs “Skin-like” front wings. Abdomen ending in pinchers (cerci) Chewing mouthparts. Striped Earwig, Labidura riparia Joseph Berger,


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