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Edwin L. Cooper, Ph.D., Sc.D. Chair Professor Taipei Medical University 2009 Distinguished Professor, Laboratory of Comparative Neuroimmunology Department.

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Presentation on theme: "Edwin L. Cooper, Ph.D., Sc.D. Chair Professor Taipei Medical University 2009 Distinguished Professor, Laboratory of Comparative Neuroimmunology Department."— Presentation transcript:

1 Edwin L. Cooper, Ph.D., Sc.D. Chair Professor Taipei Medical University 2009 Distinguished Professor, Laboratory of Comparative Neuroimmunology Department of Neurobiology, Founding Editor-in-Chief: DCI 1977 (IF 3.29 ), eCAM 2004 (2.657), JECM 2009 David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles California Tel: (310) , Fax: (310) , C

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3 "DOs and DON'Ts in Manuscript Preparation" min lecture and 10 min Discussion---- Dr. Edwin L. Cooper, Founding Editor-in-Chief Overview on Manuscript Writing Mike C.C. Chiueh, Ph.D Ways to do Highly Cited Articles Dr. Winston W. Shen, Clinical Medicine Editor Writing of Clinical Medicine Manuscripts Dr. Vincent W.S. Lee, Experimental Medicine Editor Writing of Basic Science Manuscripts Dr. Mike C.C. Chiueh, Editor-in-Chief Preparation of Highly Cited Articles

4 1. Why do you want to publish? 2. Is this important for your career? 3. What are some of the difficulties? 4. How can we make it easier? 5. Is it worth all the effort?

5 “As streams of data continue to grow in size and complexity, the need to ensure that scientific results are reliable has become even greater.”

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7 “An interim report released in October 2011 by Tilburg University, Netherlands, concluded that one of its faculty members, social psychologist Diederik Stapel, fabricated data for numerous studies conducted over a period of 15 to 20 years. The good news, of course, is that the fraud was eventually uncovered. The bad news is that it went undetected for so long and involved so many scientific articles-over l00 publications are now under investigation. The costs of the fraud for the careers of young scientists and others who worked with him, for science, and for public trust in science are devastating. As the investigation unfolds, the moment is opportune to reflect on what can be done to protect science and the public from fraud in the future.”

8 “Judy Mikovits, a biochemist who became world famous for her studies with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), was arrested and jailed on 18 November in Ventura, California, on a felony charge of possessing stolen property from a research institute that fired her in September. The property at issue consisted of her laboratory notebooks and related data.”

9 “Work that pinpointed the control of aging in a handful of genes is being taken apart by some of the scientists who made early discoveries. Efforts to replicate studies are producing conflicting results.”

10 “One experiment sees neutrinos traveling faster than light. If the result can't be replicated, it may never be explained away.”

11 1.Don’t: Lose sight of your data. 2.Do: Finalize your figures. All sections of your paper will relate directly to your figures, so putting your figures in final form is the essential first step.

12 1.Do: Describe previous work and restate what is known. It is very difficult not to borrow what has been previously said. 2.Don’t: Borrow so heavily that you commit plagiarism. It is always best to fully acquaint yourself with your subject matter and then describe it in your own words. If you are certain that someone else has said it perfectly and you cannot express it as well or better, place the citation in quotation marks and attribute it to the previous work.

13 1.Do: Give your opinions on the validity, significance, and originality of the findings presented in manuscripts. Review what you know. Use your expertise. 2.Don’t: Let your biases unrelated to the science cloud your judgment. Keep focused on the science, for that is what is being reviewed- not the authors, nor the country, and not the institution. You do not need to review all parts of a paper if there are sections that you believe you are not qualified to judge.

14 “Many Journal editors appear to strategically target authors and papers to pressure them into citing the editors’ journals.”

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18 “Ten years ago, a few scientists started an 'open access' campaign for free journals funded by author fees. Their flagship, the Public Library of Science, is expected to break even soon-but remains controversial.”

19 Once you have published many papers and contributed an original idea: write a book.

20 Thank You (Very Much) ( 非 常 ) 感 謝 你


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