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SIG Transnational Education. 2 Welcome Dr Gavin Bunting Senior Lecturer, University of Wales.

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Presentation on theme: "SIG Transnational Education. 2 Welcome Dr Gavin Bunting Senior Lecturer, University of Wales."— Presentation transcript:

1 SIG Transnational Education

2 2 Welcome Dr Gavin Bunting Senior Lecturer, University of Wales

3 1)Why focus on transnational education? 2)The HEA’s Transnational Education Group 3)Working Group themes. 4)The future 3 Overview of presentation

4 ‘Transnational education’ (TNE) refers to ‘all types of higher education study programs, or sets of courses of study, or educational services (including those of distance education) in which the learners are located in a country different from the one where the awarding institution is based’ UNESCO, Transnational education

5 5 Why focus on transnational education?

6 6 Size of UK TNE 13% increase 503, ,010

7 1.The “Oxford Brooks Effect” Oxford Brookes has a collaborative arrangement with the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA). Online students around the world who enrol on the final three ACCA papers are automatically registered as students at Oxford Brookes University for ten years. When they have completed the ACCA qualification, they may write and submit a ‘Research and Analysis Project’ to Oxford Brookes University and, if they pass, receive a BSc (Hons) in Applied Accounting. 7 Caveats 2009/102010/112011/12 Oxford Brooks University162,248239,806249,530

8 8 Size of UK TNE 321, , ,437 22% increase 7% increase

9 2.Increase in previously unreported students In 2011/12 several institutions returned a substantial number of additional students compared to 2010/11. These represent previously unreported students registered with an overseas partner. 3.HESA returns relate to headcount rather than full-time equivalent (FTE) students. It is reasonable to assume those studying by distance, flexible and distributed learning are working students who study part-time. 9 Caveats

10 10 Top 10 TNE markets for UK HEIs, 2011/12

11 “…collaborative provision, wherever and however organised, should widen learning opportunities without prejudice either to the academic standard of the award or the quality of what is offered to students. Further, the arrangements for assuring quality and standards should be as rigorous, secure and open to scrutiny as those for programmes provided wholly within the responsibility of a single institution.” UK Quality Code for Higher Education Part B: Assuring and enhancing academic quality Chapter B10 Management of collaborative arrangements 11 QAA

12 12 The HEA’s Transnational Education Group

13 13 Members  81 members  Representing 54 institutions

14 To facilitate engagement across the sector on TNE issues. To examine how to ensure an equitable student experience no matter where programmes are delivered. Identify and develop mechanisms /support to ensure high quality student learning experiences. 14 Key aims of the Group

15 15 Short term outputs 1)Community of Practice 2)Good Practice Guide 3)Policy Advice

16 Up until now universities appear to be developing their own way in TNE. Opportunities for practitioners to share experiences Communication mechanisms: / meetings / workshops / webpage. 16 Community of practice

17 It is envisaged that the guide will provide: Clarity on staff and student issues. Highlight /provide resources HEIs can use to develop the capacity of staff delivering overseas programmes. Add to the existing internationalisation information on the HEA website. 17 Good practice guide

18 18 Good practice guide HEA website Case studies Literature reviews Podcasts /videosLesson plansCheck lists 1)Staff Development 2)Student Experience 3)Partnerships 4)Models / definitions 5)Equality and Diversity 6)QAA, ensuring adherence

19 19 Working groups ThemeLeadInstitution 1. Staff Development Joan WhieldonLiverpool John Moores University 2. Student Experience Shaun SpeedUniversity of Manchester 3. Partnerships Bala ChandraThe Institute of Commonwealth Studies 4. Models / definitions Nigel HealeyNottingham Trent University 5. Equality and Diversity Julia FallonCardiff Metropolitan University 6. QAA, ensuring adherence Loraine HoultonUniversity of Wolverhampton

20 It is expected that the knowledge built up by the Group will enable it to provide advice on the development of relevant policy and guidance at a strategic level across the UK HE sector. 20 Policy Advice

21 Convene Facilitate Maintain an overview of activity Coordinate activity and provide direction Help members, network and address issues within TNE 21 My role in the Group

22 22 Working Groups

23 23 Working groups Student Experience Staff Development QAA, ensuring adherence Equality & Diversity Models & Definitions Partnerships

24 24 Staff Development Student Experience Staff Development QAA, ensuring adherence Equality & Diversity Models & Definitions Partnerships

25 25 Staff Development Pre During Post o Preparing staff, TNE often involves a different model of delivery o Intensive teaching blocks. Cultural differences. Appropriate examples / case studies. o A single point of contact back in the UK, who can help deal with issues faced on the ground, such as accessing resources. o Linking TNE experience with professional development, reward and recognition.

26 26 Staff Development It’s not just Flying Faculty…. Local staff Staff managing the partnership

27 Quality Code, Chapter B10, Indicator 17:  The awarding institution should be able to satisfy itself that staff engaged in delivering or supporting a collaborative programme are appropriately qualified for their role, and that a partner organisation has effective measures to monitor and assure the proficiency of such staff. 27 Staff Development

28 Quality Code, Chapter B10, Indicator 17:  Recognising that inexperienced staff are not necessarily properly qualified from the outset, this Indicator should be taken to include the responsibility of an awarding institution for ensuring that staff are properly trained and developed. If an entire programme is to be delivered by a partner organisation which is not itself an awarding institution, then the awarding institution should expect those staff involved in teaching to meet its usual requirements in terms of the qualifications to teach at a specific level. 28 Staff Development

29 What resources would help to address staff development? Effective and well-designed ‘Induction’ for all staff Cultural guides; diaries; dates; highlighting areas of sensitivity Sharing of world experiences Checklist for staff and infrastructure support and practical advice. Linking with PGCerts / CPD / alignment with UKPSF 29 Staff Development

30 30 Staff Development What is the Working Group producing? Training checklist – with signposting to resources Lessons learnt - ‘101 Things I wished I had known’ Collating case studies Guidance on language How to incentivise staff involved in TNE.

31 31 Equality and Diversity Student Experience Staff Development QAA, ensuring adherence Equality & Diversity Models & Definitions Partnerships

32 What values should we be promoting through TNE partnerships? How do we embed these values without being accused of cultural imperialism? The need to be sensitive to the values of partners. Equality and Diversity needs to be included in the risk analysis (e.g. people on medication, sexuality, disabilities, bribery). We can’t judge other countries by UK cultural standards. 32 Equality and Diversity

33 Examples that help understand the way that equality and diversity concerns should be integrated into management practice and operations. How is equality and diversity managed for academics, administrators and students? What support systems exist to ensure equality and diversity? How does equality and diversity awareness contribute to student experience? 33 Equality and Diversity

34 34 Models and Definitions Student Experience Staff Development QAA, ensuring adherence Equality & Diversity Models & Definitions Partnerships

35 i) Clarity surrounding models of TNE partnerships, which don’t always fit into discrete categories and may evolve over time. ii) The pros and cons of the various TNE models. iii) How much flexibility should there be in adapting programmes to suit the local context and how does this impact quality assurance (QA)? iv) It is important to articulate how QA is managed within the various models of TNE. v) What is a sustainable long term model for TNE delivery? Is the use of ‘flying faculty’ sustainable in terms of cost and building the capacity of local staff to deliver to a UK standard? vi) How will online learning / technology impact on TNE models? 35 Models / definitions

36 36 Models and Definitions Mode 1 — Cross border supplyProgramme mobility: distance or on-line education Mode 2 — Consumption abroadStudent mobility: export education Mode 3 — Commercial presence Institutional mobility: franchise/ validated partner and International Branch Campuses Mode 4 — Presence of natural persons Staff mobility: fly-in/fly-out programmes General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) and transnational education

37 37 Models and Definitions Mode 1 — Programme mobility Mode 4 — Staff mobility Mode 3 — Institutional mobility Mode 2 — Student mobility 2+1 IBC Blended

38 The emerging organisational forms of TNE are growing increasingly complex. The group is setting out to: 1) Provide a number of short exemplars of the different organisational forms of TNE – eg, franchises, validated centres, international branch campuses, flying faculty. 2)Analyse a larger number of cases with the aim of developing a more sophisticated typology of the organisational forms of TNE. 38 Models and Definitions

39 39 Partnerships Student Experience Staff Development QAA, ensuring adherence Equality & Diversity Models & Definitions Partnerships

40  What is the longevity of partnerships?  Will, in time, collaborative partners seek to obtain their own degree awarding powers and subsequently exit the partnership with the UK HEI?  What are the drivers for both sides for being involved in TNE?  The UK HEI needs to integrate TNE into its processes and procedures at all levels.  Guidance on the resources needed to effectively run TNE partnerships. 40 Partnerships

41  What is the relationship between the UK HEI and the overseas centre: collaborative, directive, supportive? Will it evolve over time?  The need to recognise that overseas partners may have different educational and professional philosophies.  It may be useful to have a checklist highlighting the areas that need considering in setting up TNE partnerships. 41 Partnerships

42 The Group is aiming to:  Collect and analysing case studies on current partnerships, looking at: o Scale o Duration o Challenges o Drivers o Benefits o Whether it has lived up to initial expectations 42 Partnerships

43 43 QAA, ensuring adherence Student Experience Staff Development QAA, ensuring adherence Equality & Diversity Models & Definitions Partnerships

44 44 QAA, ensuring adherence Risk “awarding institutions will need to adopt a risk-based approach to developing and managing collaborative activity” [QAA, 2011]  Validation  Franchise  Dual/Multiple Award  Branch Campus  Articulation arrangement  Flying Faculty  Online Provision Risks will vary depending upon the model of TNE activity

45 45 QAA, ensuring adherence Identify how to audit existing process and procedures to ensure adherence with QAA Descriptors. Identify what steps are necessary to marry UK procedures and requirements with collaborative partners. Look at QAA Descriptors and find examples how they can be used to enhance the design and delivery of TNE.

46 46 QAA, ensuring adherence The Group is aiming to: Develop a template to audit the alignment of existing provision, to QAA Descriptors with case study examples for each descriptor. Develop a Welcome pack for Collaborative Partners with Quality Assurance guidance at different levels, institutional down to module.

47 47 Student Experience Staff Development QAA, ensuring adherence Equality & Diversity Models & Definitions Partnerships

48 Experience is different depending on the TNE model. The ability of students to appraise and influence the learning and teaching experience is variable. Student engagement – involvement of NUS, staff student committees. What do students want from UK awards? What is the perceived value of a UK award? How do we capture student expectations? 48 Student Experience

49 1. Culturally sensitive ways of assessing student experience - Good examples of assessments currently in use within the host countries 2. How to help students feel part of the host institution – any ideas, case studies or innovative ways of helping students feel part of the host university (including linking in with Student Union) 3. The use of social media to capture the student experience 4. Induction material to help acquaint TNE students with procedures and processes of UK 49 Student Experience

50 50 Summary

51 51 Short term outputs 1)Community of Practice 2)Good Practice Guide 3)Policy Advice

52 52 Working groups Student Experience Staff Development QAA, ensuring adherence Equality & Diversity Models & Definitions Partnerships

53 Possible outputs for the group going forward: Conference, with an edited journal issue. Widen the membership base – include overseas institutions and students? Continual process of updating the Good Practice Guide. Develop coordinated policy positions. 53 The Future……

54 Website Details about the Group: To join: me directly at: 54 More information


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