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STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES POST SECONDARY SUCCESS WITH SSS.

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Presentation on theme: "STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES POST SECONDARY SUCCESS WITH SSS."— Presentation transcript:

1 STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES POST SECONDARY SUCCESS WITH SSS

2 TRIO HISTORY:  Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 yielded the Upward Bound program as a response to the Administration’s War on Poverty.  Higher Education Act of 1965: created the second outreach program, Talent Search.  Higher Education Amendments of 1968 created the third in a series of educational opportunity programs. Originally named the Special Services for Disadvantaged Students, this program title was then changed to Student Support Services.  By the late 1960’s the term “TRiO” was developed to describe these federal programs.

3 HIGHER EDUCATION AMENDMENTS OF 1972 Established the fourth TRIO group: Educational Opportunity Centers.

4 1976 AMENDMENTS  Authorized the Training Program for Federal TRiO Programs (initially known as the Training Program for Special Programs Staff and Leadership Personnel) Amendments:  Added the sixth program, the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program  The Department of Education created the Upward Bound Math/Science Program to address the need for specific instruction in the fields of math and science.

5 LEGISLATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR TRIO PROGRAMS:  Found in the Higher Education Act of 1965, Title IV, Part A, Subpart 2  Requirements for SSS Grant Aid can be found in Public Law

6 STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES:  All SSS projects MUST provide:  academic tutoring, which may include instruction in reading, writing, study skills, mathematics, science, and other subjects  Advice and assistance in postsecondary course selection  Assistance for students with information on the full range of student financial aid programs including benefits and resources for locating public and private scholarships  Assistance in completing financial aid applications  Education or counseling services designed to improve the financial and economic literacy  Assist students enrolled in two-year institutions with applying for admission to, and obtaining financial assistance for enrollment in four-year programs.

7 SSS PROJECTS MAY ALSO:  Provide individualized counseling for personal, career, and academic information  Complete activities and instruction designed to acquaint students with career options  Exposure to cultural events and academic programs not usually available  Mentoring programs  Secure temporary housing during breaks for students who are homeless youths and students who are in foster care or are aging of the foster care system.

8 SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED: Ultimately determined by your grant application.

9 WV TRIO: The state association of federally funded TRiO programs in West Virginia. As of September 1, 2009 there are 30 TRiO programs in West Virginia. Twenty-eight (28) of those programs belong to WV TRiO. WV TRiO is a 501(c) non-profit organization recognized by MEAEOPP (our regional association...Mid Eastern Association of Educational Opportunity Program Personnel) and COE (our national association...Council for Opportunity in Education) as a state TRiO organization.MEAEOPPCOE

10 WV TRIO: Our Mission  The mission of the Association is to promote equal educational opportunity and greater accessibility to higher education for the TRiO eligible student. WV TRiO seeks to bring together those persons who have an active interest in becoming professionally involved in broadening access to and retention in post-secondary education. The Association also seeks to provide professional staff development to ensure that qualified and informed professionals are engaged in the delivery role with the client population.  Information collected from Ed.Gov

11 Obstacles Faced by 1 st Generation Students Family pressure to stay at home Lack of family understanding of college Lack of emotional and/or financial support from home Low self-confidence in abilities Lack of role models & mentors Ackermann, 1991; Bowman & York-Anderson, 1991; Braustein & McGrath, 1997; The Education Trust, 2004; Fallon, 1997; Franklin & Streeter, 1991; Hopkins & Ishiyama, 2001; London, 1989; McGregor, Maylegen, Buzzanga, Davis, & Becker, 1991; Moran, 1991; The Pell Institute, 2004a, 2004b; Riehl, 1994; Thayer, 2000; Ting, 1998, Worrell, 1997

12 Obstacles Faced by 1 st Generation Students Guilt at moving beyond family circumstances when they remain in poverty Need to work in addition to college responsibilities Constant worry about every day money matters and stress at accumulating extensive loans Caught between two cultures, school and family Ackermann, 1991; Bowman & York-Anderson, 1991; Braustein & McGrath, 1997; The Education Trust, 2004; Fallon, 1997; Franklin & Streeter, 1991; Hopkins & Ishiyama, 2001; London, 1989; McGregor, Maylegen, Buzzanga, Davis, & Becker, 1991; Moran, 1991; The Pell Institute, 2004a, 2004b; Riehl, 1994; Thayer, 2000; Ting, 1998, Worrell, 1997)

13 National Data- 1 st Generation College Students According to a 2005 study conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics:  FG Students received lower grades and had a higher drop-out rate  FG Students were less likely to have a classified major  FG Students did not perform as well as their peers starting from the first year of college. They had lower first-year GPAs and completed fewer credit hours, on average.  FG Students needed more remedial help for college-level work and were more likely to withdraw from or repeat the courses they attempted to study.  More grades and higher grades during the first year and fewer withdrawn or repeated courses were strongly related to student persistence and earning a bachelors degree “First Generation Students in Postsecondary Education: A Look at Their College Transcripts” July 2005

14 Tips when Assisting 1 st Generation Students Help students understand that the rules for college success are different than those for high school success Help students understand appropriate college terms (Syllabi vs. Syllabuses) Encourage students to join professional organizations within their majors and connect with faculty in their fields When making referrals, try to link students with specific individuals in those departments/offices Assist students with making informed choices about their class selections (size, time/days of the week, etc.)

15 Tips when Assisting 1 st Generation Students Promote student organizations and civic engagement opportunities that minimize the size of campus and help students make connections Help students understand appropriate college terms (Syllabi vs. Syllabuses) hlp students develop pcs…omg…lol Use the Castor Oil Technique Link students with major/career resources early Provide students with a campus map Make sure students know how to contact you

16 Advising 1 st Generation College Students Advisors have a huge amount of influence on 1st Gen Students. In fact, many view their advisors as one of their only connections to the college campus, as a whole Individual attention is a powerful influence upon students’ persistence in college Oftentimes, Advisors may not only have to address the “what”, but also the “how to” Advisors can help 1st Gen Students understand “the rules” for college success Advisors can help students develop a well-crafted schedule based on their strengths and areas for improvement Provide information about important dates (last day to add classes, last day to drop, last day to withdraw, FAFSA deadlines, etc.) (Komives and Woodard, 2001; Sickles, 2004)

17 Advising 1 st Generation College Students cont’ Advisors can help students develop a well-crafted schedule based on their strengths and areas for improvement Assess computer literacy skills and assist students as needed Help students understand the demands of online classes, as well as mid- semester courses Make students aware of important dates (last day to add classes, last day to drop, last day to withdraw, FAFSA deadlines, etc.) Help students make campus connections early

18 Comments from 1 st Generation Students Based on a survey of SSS Participants conducted by the WVU SSS Program in 2011, respondents were asked what characteristics make one a “good college advisor.” According to the students, a good advisor…  Cares about my success and well-being outside of academics  Provides information about campus resources like tutoring and workshops  Is able to relate to and recognize the struggles that we face as 1 st Gen Students  Understands that 1 st Gen Students are not able to get advice pertaining to college life from their parents

19 Comments from 1 st Generation Students cont’ A good advisor…  Is positive and approachable  Is knowledgeable about financial aid programs (grants, scholarships, etc) and services available for students with disabilities  Is able to relate to me  Is my “go to” person

20 QUESTIONS or COMMENTS? “What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.” ~Ralph Waldo Emerson Terri Philpott, MSW,ACSW, LCSW SSS Director, Concord University Cynthia Drumm, MSW/MPA SSS Director, West Virginia University


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