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Investing in the Future Implementation Overview New Mexico October 30, 2003 Business Community Overview Presenter Name | Title {state} Scholars Program.

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Presentation on theme: "Investing in the Future Implementation Overview New Mexico October 30, 2003 Business Community Overview Presenter Name | Title {state} Scholars Program."— Presentation transcript:

1 Investing in the Future Implementation Overview New Mexico October 30, 2003 Business Community Overview Presenter Name | Title {state} Scholars Program

2  70% of the 30 fastest-growing jobs will require an education beyond high school.  40% of all new jobs will require at least an associate’s degree.  Total college-level job openings between will nearly equal to the number of college educated entrants to the workforce. Source: US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, The Outlook for College Graduates, , 2000, in Getting Ready Pays Off! Jobs for the Future

3 “The academic intensity of the student’s high school curriculum still counts more than anything else…in providing momachelor’s toward completing a bdegree ff ffffffffffffffffff.” C. Adelman, The Toolbox Revisited: Paths to Degree Completion from High School Through College. (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, 2006). academic intensity high school curriculum anything momentum bachelor’s degree Preparing for the Future

4 Why is State Scholars Important? High school students know they are not prepared for college or the workplace  According to a February 2005 survey conducted by Peter Hart Research Associates, 40 percent of graduates reported key gaps in their preparation. They noted that if they could do high school over again, they would work harder and take more challenging courses. Peter D. Hart Research Associates/Public Opinion Strategies (Washington, D.C.: Achieve, Inc. February 2005)

5 Why is State Scholars Important? U. S. businesses know high school students are not prepared for college or the workplace  According to the Committee for Economic Development, only 31 percent of high school students complete the rigorous complement of courses recommended by the National Commission on Excellence in Education. Source: “Cracks in the Education Pipeline: A Business Leader’s Guide to Higher Education Reform.” Committee for Economic Development, (May 2005).

6 Why is State Scholars Important? The research supports it:  Students who take a solid college preparatory curriculum are less likely to need remedial classes in college and are more likely to earn a degree. Source: Adelman, C. The Toolbox Revisited: Paths to Degree Completion from High School Through College. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, 2006.

7 Motivating students  Training business leaders to make presentations to 8th graders before they select their high school courses.  Business volunteers help students understand the career options and monetary benefits of taking rigorous courses (defined in the Scholars Core).  State Scholars programs provide academic support, incentives, and special recognition to SSI students. This ongoing support helps ensure student success in the more difficult courses.

8 What is New Hampshire Scholars? State Scholars Core Course of Study 9 th Grade10 th Grade11 th Grade12 th Grade English IEnglish IIEnglish IIIEnglish IV Algebra IGeometryAlgebra II BiologyChemistryPhysics World HistoryU.S. HistoryU.S. Govt.Economics 2 years of the same Foreign Language 4-Year College Community or Technical College Workforce (Civilian & Military)

9 What is New Hampshire Scholars? SSI’s Heaviest Focus greatest opportunity Minor focus some are already motivated special challenges Upper 25% Lower 25% Middle 50%

10 8 th Grade Presentations

11 Objective To encourage ALL high school students to complete a defined, rigorous academic course of study that prepares them for a successful transition to college or university coursework or vocational/technical training necessary to enter today’s competitive job market

12 How will effectiveness/success be measured or evaluated?  Measure yearly the percentage of 8th graders who sign up for the “New Hampshire Scholars Course of Study”  Measure yearly the percentage of seniors who successfully complete the “New Hampshire Scholars Core Course of Study”

13 Timing of Presentations  Student presentations are normally made within 2 weeks of “course sign-up day” at high school.  Parent presentations are made in the evening, normally in advance of student presentations.

14 Synopsis of 50-Minute Presentation First Half  Discussion of dynamic forces shaping world and effect on U.S.’s ability to compete.  Discussion of relationship of properly educated workforce to economic success of any nation.  Emphasis on selecting the right courses in high school to be prepared for a lifetime of continual learning.

15 Second Half Go through budget exercise based on…  Hypothetical monthly income of $2,250.  Relate it to a full-time, minimum wage job.  Recap critical importance of preparing oneself properly in high school.  Acquaint students with New Hampshire Scholars. Synopsis of 50-Minute Presentation

16 State Scholars Key Components “8 th grade presentation” - delivered by business reps “8 th grade presentation” - delivered by business reps Incentives to stay on track Incentives to stay on track Seniorrecognitionevent(s)Seniorrecognitionevent(s) GRADES

17 Federal Income Tax (15%) $300$1,950 Social Security/Medicare (10.8%) 2431,707 Medical/Dental Insurance 2151,492 Housing (Rent: 1 Bdrm, Unfurn)4001,092 Food Car Payments Insurance Gas, Oil, etc Telephone25307 Utilities Clothing50157 Entertainment50107 Savings5057 Medical Expenses2532 Furniture, TV, Appliances1517 Miscellaneous170 Payment Item Amount Left Hypothetical Monthly Income

18 Key Points  Present program in classroom setting, normally with 25–30 students per session.  Have logistics lined out well in advance of presentation day.  Do not dwell on introductions  It is difficult enough to complete in 45–50 minutes.  Use brief personal experiences.  Add, delete, modify slides as appropriate.

19 Lessons Learned  No substitute for spending time in classroom.  Multiple presentations highly recommended.  Kids respond to messages involving money.  High levels of energy, enthusiasm, and commitment are an absolute must.  Presentation without student participation can be disastrous.

20  Avoid extensive use of notes or script.  Do not shy away from being assertive and frank.  Be alert for unexpected questions; i.e., “How much do you make?”  Stay in control of the presentation and the class. Lessons Learned

21 Knowing or feeling you have “reached” the students is one of the most gratifying experiences in life! Plant an important seed. Help shape their destiny. Be remembered. The Bottom Line

22 For an electronic copy of this presentation, go to: Scott Power State Director New Hampshire Scholars x300 The work reported herein was supported under State Scholars Initiative, PR/Award Number V051U050006, as administered by the Office of Vocational and Adult Education, U.S. Department of Education. However, the contents do not necessarily represent the positions or policies of the Office of Vocational and Adult Education or the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. Questions?


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