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Knowing the Basics about Rotary First Look..... Definition of Rotary Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders united worldwide,

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Presentation on theme: "Knowing the Basics about Rotary First Look..... Definition of Rotary Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders united worldwide,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Knowing the Basics about Rotary First Look....

2 Definition of Rotary Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders united worldwide, who provide humanitarian service, encourage high ethical standards in all vocations, and help build goodwill and peace in the world. There are approximately 1.2 million Rotarians, members of more than 29,000 Rotary clubs in 161 countries. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

3 Derivation of the Rotary Name The name Rotary was chosen to reflect the custom, in the early days of the first Rotary Club in Chicago, of rotating the site of club meetings among the members' places of business. This rotation, an integral part of the founder's original concept, was designed to acquaint members with one another's vocations and to promote business, but the club's rapid growth soon made the custom impractical. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

4 Object of Rotary The Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise and, in particular, to encourage and foster: FIRST:The development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service; SECOND:High ethical standards in business and professions, the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations, and the dignifying of each Rotarian's occupation as an opportunity to serve society; THIRD:The application of the ideal of service in each Rotarian's personal, business and community life; FOURTH: The advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional persons united in the ideal of service. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

5 Avenues of Service in Rotary Since 1927, the program of Rotary has been carried out on four Avenues of Service. These avenues are : Club service Vocational service Community service International service Knowing the Basics about Rotary

6 Getting to Know More About Avenues of Service in Rotary Club Service Club Service includes the scope of activities that Rotarians undertake in support of their club, such as serving on committees, proposing individuals for membership, and meeting attendance requirements. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

7 Getting to Know More About Avenues of Service in Rotary Vocational Service Vocational Service focuses on the opportunity that Rotarians have to represent their professions as well as their efforts to promote vocational awareness and high ethical standards in business. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

8 Getting to Know More About Avenues of Service in Rotary Community Service Community Service includes the scope of activities which Rotarians undertake to improve the quality of life in their community. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

9 Getting to Know More About Avenues of Service in Rotary International Service International Service describes the activities which Rotarians undertake to advance international understanding, goodwill and peace. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

10 The 4 Way Test One of the most widely printed and quoted statements of business ethics in the world Created by Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor in 1932 when he was asked to take charge of a company that was facing bankruptcy. Adopted by Rotary in 1943 Has been translated into more than a hundred languages and published in thousands of ways Knowing the Basics about Rotary

11 The 4 Way Test "Of the things we think, say or do: 1. Is it the Truth? 2. Is it Fair to all concerned? 3. Will it build goodwill and better friendships? 4. Will it be beneficial to all concerned?" Knowing the Basics about Rotary

12 Declaration of Rotarians in Businesses and Professions Adopted by the Rotary International Council on Legislation in Its aim : To provide more specific guidelines for the high ethical standards called for in the Object of Rotary. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

13 Declaration of Rotarians in Businesses and Professions Consider my vocation to be another opportunity to serve; Be faithful to the letter and to the spirit of the ethical codes of my vocation, to the laws of my country, and to the moral standards of my community; Do all in my power to dignify my vocation and to promote the highest ethical standards in my chosen vocation; Be fair to my employer, employees, associates, competitors, customers, the public and all those with whom I have a business or professional relationship; Recognize the honor and respect due to all occupations which are useful to society; Offer my vocational talents: to provide opportunities for young people, to work for the relief of the special needs of others, and to improve the quality of life in my community; Adhere to honesty in my advertising and in all representations to the public concerning my business or profession; Neither seek from nor grant to a fellow Rotarian a privilege or advantage not normally accorded others in a business or professional relationship. As a Rotarian engaged in a business or profession, I am expected to: Knowing the Basics about Rotary

14 Mission Statement of Rotary The mission of Rotary International is to assist and guide Rotarians and Rotary clubs to accomplish the Object of Rotary, to ensure Rotary's continuing relevance, and to help build a better world, emphasizing service activities by individuals and groups that enhance the quality of life and human dignity, encouraging high ethical standards, and creating greater understanding among all people to advance the search for peace in the world. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

15 Rotary Motto's Service Above Self He Profits Most Who Serves Best Adopted as official motto at the 1950 RI Convention In 1989, the RI Council on Legislation designated "Service above Self" as the principal motto. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

16 The Rotary Wheel Rotary's first emblem was a simple wagon wheel representing civilization and movement and was designed in 1905 by Montague Bear. In 1923, the present gear wheel with 24 cogs and six spokes was adopted. A keyway to signify that the wheel was a "worker and not an idler." At the RI Convention in 1929, royal blue and gold were chosen as the official colors Knowing the Basics about Rotary

17 Membership in Rotary Membership in a Rotary club is by invitation and is based on the founder’s paradigm of choosing one representative of each business, profession and institution in the community. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

18 The Classification Principle Used to ensure that the members of a club comprise a cross section of their community's business and professional life. Classification describes either the principal business or professional service of the organization that he or she works for or the individual Rotarian's own activity within the organization. Determined by activities or services to society rather than by the position held by the particular individual. Forsters a fellowship for service based on diversity of interest, and seeks to prevent the predominance in the club of any one group. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

19 The Founder of Rotary Paul P. Harris Born in Wisconsin, USA on April 19th, 1868 On 23 February, 1905, Paul Harris formed the first club with three other businessmen, Silvester Schiele, a coal merchant; Gustavus Loehr, a mining engineer; and Hiram Shorey, a merchant tailor Named the new club "Rotary" because members met in rotation at their various places of business. Paul P. Harris, a lawyer, was the founder of Rotary, the world's first and most international service club. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

20 Rotary International and Other Organizations Rotary International has been collaborating with many civic and humanitarian organizations as well as the government agencies of various nations in its efforts to improve the human condition. An excellent example of what these partnerships can accomplish can be found in Rotary's ambitious PolioPlus program. Launched in 1985, in concert with the World Health Organization, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and UNICEF. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

21 Rotary International and Other Organizations Rotary International has been collaborating with many civic and humanitarian organizations as well as the government agencies of various nations in its efforts to improve the human condition. An excellent example of what these partnerships can accomplish can be found in Rotary's ambitious PolioPlus program. Launched in 1985, in concert with the World Health Organization, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and UNICEF. Knowing the Basics about Rotary

22 Club Service A First Look at Club Service, which is important to each Rotarian and important to the club.

23 The Importance Of A very important part of Service Above Self for all Rotarians As a new member, when we think of “Service Above Self”, we can first find ways to serve by helping in our own club. Every club needs helpers and workers to get basic jobs done.

24 To foster the successful administration of a Rotary Club The Purpose Rotarians helping in Club Service make the club work smoothly…get basic jobs done.

25 Club Service includes the scope of activities that Rotarians undertake in support of their club, such as serving on committees, proposing individuals for membership, and meeting attendance requirements. Scope of Activities Club Service includes all those activities that make a club work well.

26 Committees Committees Club Service is made up of several committees

27 Classification Committee Maintains an up-to-date roster of filled and unfilled classifications. Classifications Committees The Classification Committee keeps us aware of filled and unfilled classifications, keeps our roster up to date and reviews applications against the classification system.

28 Classification Committee Maintains an up-to-date roster of filled and unfilled classifications. Membership Development Committee Seeks out new members for the roster’s unfilled classifications and proposes programs for achieving membership growth. Membership Development Committees Membership Development is key to helping the club attract new members

29 Classification Committee Maintains an up-to-date roster of filled and unfilled classifications. Membership Development Committee Seeks out new members for the roster’s unfilled classifications and proposes programs for achieving membership growth. Membership Committee Judges the personal qualifications of proposed members. Membership Committees This Committee actually reviews and processes the new member applications.

30 Classification Committee Maintains an up-to-date roster of filled and unfilled classifications. Membership Development Committee Seeks out new members for the roster’s unfilled classifications and proposes programs for achieving membership growth. Membership Committee Judges the personal qualifications of proposed members. Rotary Information Committee Provides information about Rotary to both current and prospective members. Rotary Information Committees This committee does the orientation of new members, and plans ways to help educate all members about Rotary

31 Attendance - Promotes good attendance. Attendance Sub Committees This committee works to maintain good attendance from all Rotarians

32 Attendance - Promotes good attendance. Fellowship Activites – Plans special events and activities, makes seating arrangements, and recognizes exemplary service by individual members. Sub Committees Fellowship This committee plans the fellowship activities of the club.

33 Attendance - Promotes good attendance. Fellowship Activites – Plans special events and activities, makes seating arrangements, and recognizes exemplary service by individual members. Program – Prepares and arranges programs for weekly club meetings. Programs Sub Committees A key committee planning programs for every week’s meetings.

34 Attendance - Promotes good attendance. Fellowship Activites – Plans special events and activities, makes seating arrangements, and recognizes exemplary service by individual members. Program – Prepares and arranges programs for weekly club meetings. Public Relations – Informs the community about Rotary. Public Relations Sub Committees Public Relations Committee keeps the community informed about our club and the projects we undertake in the community

35 Attendance - Promotes good attendance. Fellowship Activites – Plans special events and activities, makes seating arrangements, and recognizes exemplary service by individual members. Program – Prepares and arranges programs for weekly club meetings. Public Relations – Informs the community about Rotary. Magazine – Creates interest in THE ROTARIAN and promotes gift subscriptions, especially during Magazine Month (April). Magazine Sub Committees This committee tries to create interest in the official magazine of Rotary

36 Attendance - Promotes good attendance. Fellowship Activites – Plans special events and activities, makes seating arrangements, and recognizes exemplary service by individual members. Program – Prepares and arranges programs for weekly club meetings. Public Relations – Informs the community about Rotary. Magazine – Creates interest in THE ROTARIAN and promotes gift subscriptions, especially during Magazine Month (April). Club Bulletin – Helps plan and produce the club bulletin. Club Bulletin Sub Committees This committee prepares the weekly club bulletin

37 All committee chairs stay in close contact with key officers of the club All club committee chairpersons should maintain close contact with the key officers of the club Committee Chairs

38 Every Rotarian is expected to be involved in Club Service. Rotarians support their club by getting involved in Club Service Member Support

39 Membership and our Rotary Club Membership and our Rotary Club. Membership. A Rotary Club is as strong and vital as its membership is strong and vital. Membership Development is a very important priority for our Rotary club.

40 RI Past President Herb Brown… “…the single most effective way we can strengthen our ability to do good in the world is to increase club membership…” RIPP Herb Brown said it well. In order for our club to be effective as a club, effective in our community and effective in the world, we must work to insure our membership is strong. When we bring a good new member into our club, or when we encourage a club member to really become involved, we strengthen Rotary in our world.

41 Getting and Keeping Members A Rotary Club’s greatest challenge Requiring constant attention from club leadership Needs involvement of club members In fact, getting and keeping good members is one of the greatest challenges facing our Rotary Club today. And we face it every year! Our club leadership must make plans for membership development an important part of their agenda throughout the year. And just as important, each of us as club members must also be fully aware of the importance of membership development. Getting and keeping good members must be a priority.

42 In the past Our Clubs enjoyed net growth each year New clubs were formed in significant numbers Historically, our Rotary Clubs enjoyed net growth year after year. And added to that, new clubs were formed in significant numbers. Rotary saw year after year of solid membership growth.

43 But these last few years Our membership growth has required extraordinary efforts –Membership Quest Emphasis has been successful Now we have a Net membership gain again! But in recent years, our growth slowed! For two years we saw a net membership loss in Rotary for the first time in our history. The good news is that the Membership Quest has turned that situation around. But Rotarians everywhere must continue to work on membership. Our club must also take up the challenge.

44 Rotary’s great challenge Membership Getting good members Properly orienting new members Keeping members Membership development should be one of the highest priorities for a Rotary Club. Finding good members, orienting members and keeping good members. These are very important tasks for the club…and for each of us.

45 Our Club and our members Must make an ongoing commitment Cannot just be a “short-term” campaign Identifying good prospective members is “job one”. Our Rotary Club must make an ongoing commitment to Membership Development. A “short-term” campaign often is only a temporary solution. We need to be dedicated to constantly working to identify good prospective members for our club.

46 Proposing a new Member Our whole process of –Proposal –Classification –Approval –Orientation Must be monitored and improved And we need to give attention to the process. Our members need to know more about how to identify and propose new members. We need to do a more efficient job of processing a new member. Our process may need re-engineering!

47 Proposing a new member Proposing a new member is an important responsibility of every Rotarian. This form is key to the process, and needs to be readily available to every member as we work to identify and process new members.

48 Installing the new Member Should be a great celebration for the new member And also for the club Needs careful planning We should plan to “roll out the red carpet” when we welcome a new member into the club. This is a time of celebration for the new member. And it is also a time for celebration for the club. Careful plans need to be made for the installation of the new member to insure it is meaningful to all.

49 Orientation and Mentoring New members need information about Rotary Mentoring helps new members for the first few months New members need to be informed about Rotary. Orientation and ongoing mentoring are both very important aspects of successful membership development. Members who are well oriented into Rotary usually become good Rotarians and stay as productive members of the club.

50 New Members Are essential to the life of our club A constant priority for our club Requires full club commitment Our club needs to be organized to work to bring good new members into our club on a consistent basis. To accomplish this, our club leadership and our club members need to see membership development as a very high priority for our club.

51 Attrition….a club’s nightmare! Clubs loose 12 to 15 percent of members ANNUALLY! Clubs loose 12 to 15 percent of members ANNUALLY! Losing club members can weaken a club. On average, every club loses from 12 to 15 percent of membership each year. This fact requires that our club carefully examine causes of membership loss, and take proactive steps to hold membership loss to low levels.

52 Why do members leave? Some reasons are valid But all too often… –Our club fails to meaningfully involve the new member Retaining members is important –Of equal importance to getting new members We know some members leave for very valid reasons. But too often, members leave because they have not found Rotary to be meaningful to them. They have not really been properly oriented and assimilated into Rotary.

53 Proactive membership retention Surveying membership Identifying special interests Meaningful assignments Frequent monitoring Our club needs a proactive program of membership retention. Surveying membership to evaluate what we are doing and to measure member morale and interests is very important. Identifying interests of members is also important. Only with this information can we make meaningful assignments of club members. And we must also monitor our membership, looking for ways to better retain club members.

54 Every member can help A club atmosphere of fellowship Efforts to be an open and accepting club Sensitive to the interests, needs and attendance of each member In membership development, sometimes little things can be very important. For example, creating a good feeling of club fellowship in our meetings can be very important in causing a fellow member to feel a part of our club. Our leadership and also every member needs to be attentive to the interests, needs and attendance of other members.

55 Our club goal To bring the very best new members into our club. To develop the new member into a lifetime Rotarian! In membership development, our goal is pretty simple: We want to bring the very best new members into our club. And just as important, we want to develop the new member into a lifetime Rotarian!

56 Getting good new members… and then…. Keeping members So let us in our club join in the challenge!

57 Must be set as a high priority for our club…. This year and every year! Let us set our plans and priorities! Working together, we can do a very effective job of membership development!

58 Club Leadership Plan Recommended Administrative Structure for Rotary Clubs

59 Purpose The purpose of the Club Leadership Plan is to strengthen Rotary at the club level by providing the administrative framework of an effective club.

60 Features Extension of the District Leadership Plan to the club level Provides list of steps clubs should take to implement the plan Fosters continuity and consensus among leaders Includes simplified list of standing club committees that are supported by the district structure Supported by the new Recommended Rotary Club Bylaws Is not mandatory Recommended for new or struggling Rotary clubs

61 New Standing Committees * Club Board of Directors Club Administration Club Public Relations Membership Service Projects The Rotary Foundation *Additional committees can be appointed as needed on an annual basis

62 New Standing Committees Club Board of Directors Club Administration Club Public Relations Membership Service Projects The Rotary Foundation District support of the Club Leadership Plan Assistant Governors Public Relations Committee Membership Development Committee District Programs Committees The Rotary Foundation Committee

63 Benefits Continuity in projects and decision making Consensus for decision making and goal setting A larger and stronger field of club leaders Succession planning for club leadership Involves all club members in club activities

64 Timeframe November 2004 – Club Leadership Plan is the recommended structure for Rotary Clubs January 2005-July 05 – Plan is promoted to the Rotary world July 2005 – Club Leadership Plan publication available March 2006 – All club distribution of the Club Leadership Plan publication at PETS Rotary year – Rotary clubs may begin to implement the plan

65 Community Service When Rotarians seek opportunities to serve others, we do this through our four avenues of service: Community Service, Club Service, Vocational Service and International Service.

66 Community Service is a very important avenue of service for Rotarians, and often is the one each of us can become involved in quickly…even as new Rotarians. The Third Avenue of Service Once described as the “ heartbeat of Rotary, “ Community Service is the third Avenue of Service in Rotary.

67 Purpose “Midland Bllom “ project – An annual planting of petunias in city’s main arteries Every Rotarian strives to improve the quality of life for those who live in the community and to serve the public interest. When we do this, we improve the quality of life for our fellow citizens in our community

68 Opportunities for Service Club does an assessment of community needs. Identifies service opportunities consistent with club’s interests. Our club starts by assessing what is needed in our community and matching those needs with the interests of our Rotary Club.

69 Club seeks to use the talents and skills of members in implementing Community Service projects. Rotarian helping the orphans of the Dominican Republic Member Participation And of course we also take into account the many talents and skills of our club members as we consider a selection of a Community Service Project

70 Involve New Generations Patients await medical consultations at a clinic sponsored by a Rotary Club Club may work with the Interact clubs, Rotaract clubs, and Rotary Village Corps to coordinate Community Service efforts. Our club may also team with an Interact or Rotaract Club, or with a Rotary Village Corps to accomplish a project.

71 Involve the Community The Dreams Committee proposes that Rotary Clubs make a commitment for “Clean Water For Every Community” Involve the community, when desirable and feasible, in implementing Community Service projects, including the provision of required resources. Our club may also seek to involve others in the community in accomplishing a Community Service Project, to provide financial support, additional “people-power” or to provide needed materials

72 Partner with Others Cooperate with other organizations in accordance with RI policy, to achieve Community Service objectives. Our club may also partner with other civic or community organizations to more effectively undertake the project.

73 Plan the Project When a project is selected, then the club begins work planning to undertake the project. Committees and work crews are organized as needed.

74 Fosters Fellowship In addition to the value of the project to the community, clubs often find great fellowship comes from such projects. The project is of great value to the community. As an additional benefit, clubs find projects to be a great fellowship event for the club.

75 Use Good P.R. Achieve proper public recognition for their Community Service projects. Throughout the planning, selection and execution of the project our club will look for appropriate ways to achieve public recognition of Rotary and our club in our community.

76 Transfer Responsibility Transfer responsibility for continuing projects to other organizations, so that the Rotary club can become involved in new projects. When a project is complete, our club may seek to transfer the continuing work for the project to other organizations to enable the club to consider other Community Service Projects.

77 Member Involvement Rotarians can serve on Community Service committees in our club. And each of us can be involved in actual projects as well. Club members can elect to become involved in Community Service Projects by serving on committees in our club, and also by volunteering to be part of an actual project team or work force.

78 Consider Projects Rotary International encourages clubs and Rotarians to consider projects in these areas of interest Some ongoing interests of Rotary International can be good Community Service Project ideas.

79 Rotary Concerns Environmental Protection Functional Literacy Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Urban Peace Concern for the Aging AIDS Education This is a partial listing of concerns of Rotary International that may fit a need in our community. Resource information may be available from Rotary International as well.

80 Service Above Self Community Service An Avenue of Service for all Rotarians. Opportunity to demonstrate “Service above Self” in our community. Community Service. Service to our Community. A demonstration of the meaning of Service above Self for all Rotarians.

81 Vocational Service This First Look module is about Vocational Service, one of the four avenues of service in Rotary.

82 Second of the four Avenues of Service of Rotary The Second Avenue Vocational Service is an important way Rotarians can make a difference in the work world.

83 The way Rotary fosters and supports the application of the ideal of service in the pursuit of all vocations. Purpose Rotarians can convey ideas of Rotary and good business ethics via Vocational Service

84 Adherence to, and promotion of, the highest ethical standards in all occupations The recognition of the worthiness to society of all useful occupations, not just one’s own or those which are pursued by Rotarians The contribution of one’s vocational talents to the problems and needs of society Ideals These are the ideals adopted by Rotary regarding Vocational Service

85 Adopted by the Rotary International Council on Legislation in Its aim : To provide more specific guidelines for the high ethical standards called for in the Object of Rotary. Declaration Declaration of Rotarians in Businesses and Professions Rotary’s Council on Legislation adopted the following Declaration in 1989

86 Article 1. Consider my vocation to be another opportunity to serve Article I The Declaration is made up of several articles

87 Article 2. Be faithful to the letter and to the spirit of the ethical codes of my vocation, to the laws of my country, and to the moral standards of my community Article II

88 Article 3. Do all in my power to dignify my vocation and to promote the highest ethical standards in my chosen vocation Article III

89 Article 4. Be fair to my employer, employees, associates, competitors, customers, the public and all those with whom I have a business or professional relationship. Article IV

90 Article 5. Recognize the honor and respect due to all occupations which are useful to society Article V

91 Vocational Service Article 6. Offer my vocational talents: to provide opportunities for young people, to work for the relief of the special needs of others, and to improve the quality of life in my community Article VI

92 Article 7. Adhere to honesty in my advertising and in all representations to the public concerning my business or profession. Article VII

93 Article 8. Neither seek from nor grant to a fellow Rotarian a privilege or advantage not normally accorded others in a business or professional relationship. Article VIII

94 The Vocational Service Committee is established in the club as an avenue of service for interested Rotarians Club Committee Rotarians are expected to involve themselves in Vocational Service in some manner as part of a commitment to Service Above Self.

95 The Club’s Vocational Service Committee Focuses on helping people gain the skills necessary for employment. Training

96 This club committee oversees projects that increase employment opportunities and promotes positive relations at workplace. Vocation at Work

97 The committee helps create awareness about vocations and helps Rotarians learn more about the full spectrum of vocations. Awareness

98 The Vocational Service Committee recognizes vocational excellence and high ethical standards. Awards

99 The Vocational Service Committee encourages and facilitates Rotarian participation in volunteer activities at local, districts and international levels. Awareness

100 Vocational Service Month October is the Vocational Service Month in the Rotary World and is an ideal time to initiate a new project. In October, Rotary makes special emphasis on Vocational Service

101 Responsibility Vocational Service The responsibility of both the Rotary Club & its members

102 World Community Service First look at.. Each year,Rotary Clubs are urged to undertake a new World Community Service project. Identifying or researching the availability of World Community Service projects may be daunting unless one has sufficient knowledge of the subject. This series of slides will provide an introduction to World Community Service.

103 WCS Projects Japanese Rotarian administering polio vaccine during Bangladesh’s National Immunization Days in 1999 Every time a Rotary club in one country helps a Rotary club in another to complete a local project it's an example of World Community Service (WCS).

104 What is WCS? A Rotary program by which a club or district in one country provides humanitarian assistance to a club in another country. World Community Service is the Rotary program by which a club or district in one country provides humanitarian assistance to a club in another country. Typically the aid goes to a developing community where the Rotary project will help raise the standard of living and the quality of life. The ultimate object of World Community Service is to build goodwill and understanding among peoples of the world.

105 International Service The Manual of Procedure 1998 defines World Community Service (WCS) as, “A program consisting of activities within international service through which Rotarians conduct projects to improve lives and meet human needs, and thus promote international understanding and goodwill by means of material, technical and professional assistance.” But what about the goals of the WCS program? In the next series of slides, we will learn more about them. The World Community Service program consists of activities within the international service avenue of a Rotary Club and Rotary District.

106 WCS Goal #1 Improve the quality of life of those in need Construction of deep bore well to provide drinking water The main goal of the WCS program is undoubtedly aimed towards improving the quality of life of those in need while at the same time promoting international understanding and goodwill. This can be done by providing either material, or technical or professional assistance.

107 WCS Goal #2 Encourage cooperation between Rotary clubs and districts in different countries WCS also encourages cooperation between Rotary clubs and disctricts in different countries in their effort to carry out international service projects.

108 WCS Goal #3 Provide an effective framework for the exchange of information on project needs and offers of assistance WCS also provides an effective framework for the exchange of information on project needs and offers assistance. One important way to find a club in some other part of the world which needs help on a worthy project is to use the WCS Projects Exchange, a list of dozens of worthy activities in developing areas. The exchange list is maintained in the RI Secretariat in Evanston and is readily available upon request. It outlines projects, provides estimated costs and gives names of the appropriate contacts. Clubs which need assistance, or are seeking another club to help with a humanitarian project, such as building a clinic, school, hospital, community water well, library or other beneficial activity, may register their needs. Clubs seeking a desirable World Community Service project may easily review the list of needs registered in the Projects Exchange. Thus, the exchange provides a practical way to link needs with resources.

109 WCS Goal #4 To increase awareness among Rotarians of international development and cultural issues WCS aims to increase awareness among Rotarians about international development and cultural issues and the importance of implementing projects that help people help themselves.

110 WCS Goal #5 Foster international understanding, goodwill and peace. But overall, WCS contribute to the forstering of international understanding, goodwill and peace among all people.

111 Resources How do I get more information on the WCS ? Available Resources More to come... At this stage, you would surely be asking yourself, “All this is very good, but where do I start looking for WCS projects ??? “ Let’s browse the available resources...

112 WCS on the RI Web The WCS section of the R.I. Web Site You may get more information from the WCS projects exchange of Rotary International at Evanston. Clubs which need assistance, or are seeking another club to help with a humanitarian project, such as building a clinic, school, hospital, community water well, library or other beneficial activity, may register their needs. Clubs seeking a desirable World Community Service project may easily review the list of needs registered in the Projects Exchange. Thus, the exchange provides a practical way to link needs with resources. Searching for ideas for WCS projects The RI project database contains brief descriptions of more than 650 successful projects in a variety of service areas.

113 WCS Task Force The WCS Task Force section of RI Pres. Frank Devlyn’s Website along with its Discussion Forum Another place worth visiting to obtain WCS information is RI President Frank Devlyn’s web site. A discussion forum on World Community Service is available online as well.

114 WCSR Network The World Community Service Resource Network Website The World Community Service Resource Network website acts like a “switchboard” or “yellow pages” directory of online resources of information regarding World Community Service (WCS), Matching Grant (MG), Health, Hunger, and Humanity (3H), Disaster Relief (DR), and other Humanitarian Aid Programs of Rotary and other organizations.

115 Get Involved in WCS Every Rotarian can become involved in WCS Every Rotarian can become involved in WCS. You can register your knowledge, skills and experience with the WCSRN Knowledge Database (also called the WCSRN Data Sheet). This is the Database that is maintained by Rotary International so they can answer inquiries from Rotarians around the world. It is anticipated that this Database will ultimately be used to create Special Interest Groups (SIGs) that will consist of Rotarians who have expertise and/or interest in specific subject areas.

116 How it Works-Step #1 How to get involved in WCS 1. First browse through the available online resources for projects that match personal interest

117 How it Works-Step #2 Seek WCS Projects that match personal interest How to get involved in WCS 2.Register at World Community Service Resource Network (WCSRN) of Rotary International.

118 How it Works-Step #3 Rotary International WCS Project Exchange Seek WCS Projects that match personal interest How to get involved in WCS 3.Check at the WCS Project Exchange of Rotary International.

119 How it Works-Step #4 WCS Task Force & Discussion Forum Rotary International WCS Project Exchange Seek WCS Projects that match personal interest How to get involved in WCS 4.Review the WCS Task Force section at RI President Frank Devlyn’s website.

120 How it Works-Step #5 WCS Resource Network WCS Task Force & Discussion Forum Rotary International WCS Project Exchange Seek WCS Projects that match personal interest How to get involved in WCS 5.From the WCSRN, look for comprehensive information for carrying out international service projects. Check also for funding opportunities, available through The Rotary Foundation and other resources, and international shipping procedures for donated materials.

121 How it Works-Step #6 6.Contact the appropriate Rotary club in distant country. WCS Resource Network WCS Task Force & Discussion Forum Rotary International WCS Project Exchange Seek WCS Projects that match personal interest How to get involved in WCS Completion of WCS Project

122 How it Works-Step #7 WCS Resource Network WCS Task Force & Discussion Forum Rotary International WCS Project Exchange Seek WCS Projects that match personal interest How to get involved in WCS Completion of WCS Project 7.Move to complete project and at the same time build bridges of friendship and world understanding.

123 The Rotary Foundation Your Rotary Foundation - How does it work?... Most of us have already read or heard much about our Rotary Foundation, but many of us still do not completely understand the mechanics of how it actually operates. Today I want to share with you a new and simple concept to explain how Rotary's "financial engine"... The Rotary Foundation, actually works.

124 Processing Plant Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant Let's consider the Rotary Foundation as a processing plant... a typical factory building that we see in our community each day. The front of this building has a Rotary Foundation logo and a sign that reads: "Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant." For now, let's envision that we are operating a Money Processing Plant for Rotary International and all Rotarians around the world.

125 What’s Inside? RF $ Processing Plant Departments What is inside?... several departments... and we want to identify the various ones we have within our processing plant, just like a real one would have. In reality there are several, but for the sake of time and simplicity we will only discuss the main ones.

126 Receiving Dept. RF $ Processing Plant Departments What areas would we expect to see inside?... As in any processing plant, we would likely see a receiving department to bring raw materials into our plant. $ RECEIVING

127 Shipping Dept. $ SHIPPING $ RECEIVING RF $ Processing Plant Departments What else would we need?... We would also require a shipping department to distribute our finished products to the world.

128 Administration & PolioPlus $ SHIPPING $ RECEIVING ADMINPOLIOPLUS RF $ Processing Plant Departments And of course, it would not be any surprise to see an Administrative Department. In Rotary's case, we also have a major product category called "PolioPlus", so we've devoted a complete department to that function.

129 World Fund $ SHIPPING $ RECEIVING ADMINPOLIOPLUS WORLD FUND 50% GSE Matching Grant Peace Program 3H RF $ Processing Plant Departments In addition to departments for administration and PolioPlus, we see a major portion of our facility is used to process the funds... "the money!". The world fund takes up 50% of our space, processing that portion of our annual giving,... offering one annual GSE per District, Matching Grants, Peace Forums, and other Humanitarian Aid Programs.

130 DDF $ SHIPPING $ RECEIVING ADMINPOLIOPLUS WORLD FUND 40% GSE Matching Grant Peace Program 3H DDF 50% Scholarships 2nd GSE Matching Grant RF $ Processing Plant Departments The remaining 50% of this unrestricted contribution is processed through your District's Designated Fund (or, DDF for short). Many Rotarians do not realize the allocation of these funds can be determined by them through their District leaders,... targeting the programs they deem most worthy in their region. Things like the Scholarship Program, a second GSE, and District sharing in support of matching grants are areas for consideration.

131 Types of Funds “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ RECEIVING Our receiving docks are located on one side of the plant, with several doors to accept delivery of raw materials each day.

132 Annual Giving “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ RECEIVING Annual Program Fund The first door is set up to receive Annual Funds, which come from Rotarians around the world on a regular and continuing basis. This money is processed and eventually distributed through our shipping department.

133 Permanent Fund “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ RECEIVING Annual Program Fund Permanent Fund Next, we have an entrance to receive Permanent Fund contributions, which are set aside and stored in perpetuity. Through a special process, this product grows in size and we use this increase as part of our product offering

134 PolioPlus “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ RECEIVING Annual Program Fund Permanent Fund PolioPlus Fund Our third receiving door accepts donations flagged for the PolioPlus department. While the materials are processed in a similar way to others, the magnitude and unique properties of this product determined it needed a separate area.

135 Restricted Giving “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ RECEIVING Annual Program Fund Permanent Fund PolioPlus Fund Restricted Fund And last, we have a special door for Restricted Giving because these funds require very little processing within the plant. They are a complimentary product received in support of specific matching grant projects and get shipped with their respective matching grant.

136 PHF Contributions $ Paul Harris Fellow $ “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ RECEIVING Annual Program Fund Permanent Fund Restricted Fund PolioPlus Fund Next come the supplier trucks! We have to rely on various vehicles to bring us raw materials... in our case "the money!" Much of this comes through Paul Harris Fellow and Sustaining Member contributions, either as a full US$1000. contribution or the US$100 for ten years option.

137 Benefactors $ Benefactor $ “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ RECEIVING Annual Program Fund Permanent Fund PolioPlus Fund Restricted Fund Another trucking company called "Benefactor & Bequests" also delivers funds on a regular basis. These are gathered from members who arrange future donations through their will or estate planning.

138 Major Gifts $ Major Gift $ “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ RECEIVING Annual Program Fund Permanent Fund PolioPlus Fund Restricted Fund In many cases we have special suppliers, who believe in our mission and have the ability to provide extra resources through Major Gifts. These trucks are much bigger, since they must carry contributions in excess of US$10,000.

139 Other Contributions $ Others $ “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ RECEIVING Annual Program Fund Permanent Fund PolioPlus Fund Restricted Fund There are often other miscellaneous vehicles, which drop off funds at our receiving docks. They come from various club or district fundraisers like: sales, walk-a-thons, gala dinners, auctions and other unique events.

140 SHARE SHARING 50% Annual Programs Fund Contributions At the Rotary Foundation we have a participative management style. A key part of our production process includes sharing the decision making and allocation of resources, received from annual giving. World Fund DDF

141 Funds Allocation CONTRIBUTION INVESTMENT 3 years cycle From all the material we process, 50% is set aside, into a District Designated Fund... sometimes referred to as the DDF or District Share. Each year, local members determine, through their District Leaders, which programs are a priority in their specific region, then funds are targeted toward that area. The remaining 50% is put toward world fund programs.

142 Foundation Trustees “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ SHIPPING Like many processors... we use sub-contractors. Our Trustees work with "bank and investment managers" to invest our money wisely for up to three years. So funds that came into our receiving department during will be processed and shipped during the Rotary year. The investment income from this period is used to cover administrative costs. In some cases you may hear that we spent 103% of funds received, which simply means that our administrative costs were 3% less than our investment income.

143 Ambassadorial Scholars “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ SHIPPING Ambassadorial Scholarships After processing the funds our product is complete and ready for delivery... so we begin to think about the shipping department. Similar to the receiving docks, we have shipping doors located on the opposite side of the facility. Again, a variety of vehicles are used to distribute funds through various shipping doors. One of them is for Scholarship Programs.

144 Matching Grants “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ SHIPPING Ambassadorial Scholarships Matching Grants At another, we distribute Matching Grants. As mentioned earlier, this product category is often made up from three sources: the Rotary Foundation grant from the world fund, possible funds from a DDF, and project sponsor contributions, processed as restricted giving for a specific project.

145 GSE “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ SHIPPING Ambassadorial Scholarships Matching Grants GSE A third door ships funds out to the GSE teams. Over 500 of these exchanges take place each year. Each district automatically receives funding for one from the world fund and can choose to fund a second one from their DDF.

146 3-H Grants “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ SHIPPING Ambassadorial Scholarships Matching Grant GSE 3H Grants Major 3H projects have their own Health, Hunger & Humanity shipping door. These are for larger scale, one to three year projects, which are often multi-club or multi-district initiatives

147 PolioPlus “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ SHIPPING Ambassadorial Scholarships Matching Grant GSE 3H Grants PolioPlus And, as mentioned before, PolioPlus makes up a large part of our product line with it's own department within Rotary Foundation

148 Scholars $ $ “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ SHIPPING Ambassadorial Scholarships Matching Grant GSE 3H Grants PolioPlus Similar to the inbound vehicles, the trucks come on a daily basis to pick up funds for various recipients. Your Foundation sponsors one of the largest international scholarship programs in the world, with over $22 million invested last year.

149 Matching Grants “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ SHIPPING $ Club/Dist. Projects $ MG Ambassadorial Scholarships Matching Grant GSE 3H Grants PolioPlus Through matching grants, Rotarians provide humanitarian aid around the world, making life better through such projects as: medical and health aid; water wells; shelters and literacy programs. Other grants are also available for Rotary volunteers and Discovering the feasibility of proposals

150 GSE Teams $ SHIPPING $ GSE TEAMS $ Ambassadorial Scholarships Matching Grant GSE 3H Grants PolioPlus “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” A third area is the GSE program which provides travel grants for business and professional exchange teams to make international visits between paired districts. Approximately 8% of our funds go to this program each year.

151 3-H Grants “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” $ SHIPPING $ Club/Dist. Projects $ 3H Ambassadorial Scholarships Matching Grant GSE 3H Grants PolioPlus The 3H funds are shipped to larger and longer-term projects in the world and represent approximately 19% of our program disbursements

152 PolioPlus $ SHIPPING $ Polio Eradication $ Ambassadorial Scholarships Matching Grant GSE 3H PolioPlus “Rotary Foundation $ Processing Plant” By the year 2008, Rotarians hope to eradicate Polio from the globe. There is still room in the truck to carry more funds and help complete this important mission.

153 Support TRF Most of us are committed to the ideals of Rotary service. We all put a lot of time and energy into our projects, helping with both local and international needs. But some of us may not stop to realize that our Rotary Foundation is a charity... It needs regular annual giving, just like our church... and a healthy permanent fund will ensure we can continue to shine the light of hope on those areas of despair, in the dark corners of the world. Through this presentation, I hope you have developed a better understanding of how your Rotary Foundation works,... and that you will commit to support our Foundation and it's programs generously. Please Support The Rotary Foundation

154 QUESTIONS?


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