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© Health Quality Council 2008 Going Lean – Can It Work for Universities? Keith A. Willoughby, Ph.D. Senior Operations Research Specialist Health Quality.

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Presentation on theme: "© Health Quality Council 2008 Going Lean – Can It Work for Universities? Keith A. Willoughby, Ph.D. Senior Operations Research Specialist Health Quality."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Health Quality Council 2008 Going Lean – Can It Work for Universities? Keith A. Willoughby, Ph.D. Senior Operations Research Specialist Health Quality Council Saskatoon, SK Denis Caron Provincial Dean of Industrial Training Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science & Technology (SIAST) Saskatoon, SK

2 © Health Quality Council Part I Lean 101 –History, principles, tools Success stories Lessons learned

3 © Health Quality Council What we hope to accomplish Acquaint you with the concepts of Lean Introduce some of the language Answer the questions, “What is it? What’s in it for me?”

4 © Health Quality Council More information on Lean systems Womack JP, Jones DT, Roos D. The Machine That Changed the World, Womack JP, Jones DT. Lean Thinking, Some valuable websites: –www.lean.org (Lean Enterprise Institute)www.lean.org –www.leanUK.org (Lean Enterprise Academy)www.leanUK.org

5 © Health Quality Council Pop Quiz Who started this whole notion of Lean principles, and when did they do this?

6 © Health Quality Council Answer A? Jim Womack (1990) 5-year, $5 million study of global vehicle production –International Motor Vehicle Program Co-authored “The Machine That Changed the World” with Dan Jones and Dan Roos Coined the term “Lean”

7 © Health Quality Council Is it…Answer B? Taiichi Ohno ( ) 1950’s: Toyota Production System –Continuous Flow Production –Just-in-Time (JIT) –Eliminate defects –Top management commitment –Employee participation 1969: Established the Operations Management Consulting Group –“Trainers” commissioned to promote Lean thinking within Toyota and the firms in its supplier group

8 © Health Quality Council Or, how about… Answer C? C.R. Dooley Helped to develop the “Training Within Industry” program (1940s) Infiltrated into Japanese industry by the Allied forces after World War II

9 © Health Quality Council Could it be…Answer D? Henry Ford, 1920s Continuous Flow Assembly Reduce wasted time – : doubled production with no increase in workforce – : Cycle time from 21 days to 2 days

10 © Health Quality Council But maybe it is…Answer E? Eli Whitney (1700’s) Quick production of high-quality muskets –Standard interchangeable parts –Minimal product variation –Ordered and integrated workflow

11 © Health Quality Council Another choice…Answer F? The Venetian arsenal Republic of Venice, early 16 th century Could produce nearly one ship each day –Standardized parts –Production-line basis

12 © Health Quality Council What does this show us? This is not new stuff So why all the buzz today?

13 © Health Quality Council What is “Lean”? Providing value with less waste Making common sense common practice

14 © Health Quality Council Lean definitions Providing exactly what the customer needs, safely, when needed, in precisely the right quantity, and without waste Providing value for the customer A set of quality improvement tools and philosophy designed to eliminate the sources of waste in a system

15 © Health Quality Council The 8 sources of system waste Correction (defects)Waiting OverproductionInventory MotionOverprocessing Material movement (transportation) Underutilized human talent

16 © Health Quality Council What Lean is NOT Layoffs Customers = widgets Making people work faster

17 © Health Quality Council Lean principles 1. What is value from the customer’s perspective? 2. Understand your process –We’ll say more about this later 3. Smooth the flow –Eliminate congestion

18 © Health Quality Council More principles 4. Pull –Supplier doesn’t produce until the customer signals a need –Is there smooth communication between process steps? 5. Pursue perfection –A continual, never-ending journey

19 © Health Quality Council Lean tools: A quick survey Poka-Yokes (Failsafes) –Eliminates or reduces the opportunities for mistakes Check John Grout's PokaYoke Page on

20 © Health Quality Council Vehicles Arrow to indicate location of fuel tanks (driver/ passenger side) –Great for rental vehicles Gas cap tether does not allow the motorist to drive off without the cap

21 © Health Quality Council European streets Tourists used to right- hand side driving need some help in London Instructions are printed right on the asphalt

22 © Health Quality Council At the airport If your bag fits in the size-wise unit it will fit in the overhead compartment

23 © Health Quality Council Visual control systems Labels, colour-coding to: –make it easier to find items –quicker ability to detect abnormal from normal Examples: –Surgical shadowboards –Diagonal stripe along the fronts of binders

24 © Health Quality Council The philosophy of 5S “5S” stands for 5 Japanese words each beginning with the letter “S” Translated into English as: –Sort, Set, Shine, Standardize, Sustain

25 © Health Quality Council Exploring 5S “A visually-oriented system for organizing the workplace to minimize the waste of time” “Clears the clouds” –Eliminates the waste of motion/ looking for things Makes the abnormal visually obvious

26 © Health Quality Council Does this look familiar?

27 © Health Quality Council Some more on 5S It is NOT simply cleaning up! Following 5S principles helps provide the disciplined habits necessary for further phases of Lean implementation

28 © Health Quality Council S: Five Hills Health Region (before)

29 © Health Quality Council S: Five Hills Health Region (after)

30 © Health Quality Council More from Five Hills

31 © Health Quality Council Process mapping Obtain clearer understanding of how the process currently operates Helps “learn to see” and “develop eyes for waste” –Redundant processing, unnecessary movement or wait time Assist with identifying and planning improvements

32 © Health Quality Council Process mapping in practice

33 © Health Quality Council Facilitating communication

34 © Health Quality Council Lessons learned Culture, culture, culture –Top-down vision –Front-line enthusiasm Build your own capacity The first pass through a process map can identify obvious sources of waste

35 © Health Quality Council Lessons learned Let your data tell the story There is a difference between a good idea and the right idea Imbed improvement events within the day-to-day operations of your organization Start with maintenance or purchasing

36 © Health Quality Council Part II Lean Application in Post-Secondary Institutions

37 © Health Quality Council Words of Wisdom "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius - and a lot of courage - to move in the opposite direction." "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." Albert Einstein

38 © Health Quality Council 2008 Strategic Thinking Old Mind Develop strategic plans Operate independently Lead with authority Cope with technology Delegate financial management Communicate facts and logic Manage risk Become an expert New Mind Plan, think strategically Lead with vision & teams Leverage technology Develop personal business acumen Uses metaphors, stories, images Balance risk and reward Remain a learner

39 © Health Quality Council 2008 Strategic sense Management Get on the Balcony 1 1 Heifetz, R.A & Laurie, D.L. (2001) Leadership

40 © Health Quality Council 2008 Strategic Planning Model (Traditional)

41 © Health Quality Council 2008 Strategic Thinking Model Strategic Planning “What and Why” Supporting Objectives “What” EvaluatePlan in Action “How”

42 © Health Quality Council 2008 Why Lean? Public sector perspective - Finance stewardship

43 © Health Quality Council 2008 Why Lean? Public sector perspective - Human resources and capacity

44 © Health Quality Council 2008 SIAST’s Approach (How?) SIAST and division strategic plan Business case Survey Strategic direction Lean program pilot –Industrial Mechanics Labs and Classrooms

45 © Health Quality Council 2008 Leaning Industrial Mechanic’s Program “Pursuing Excellence”

46 © Health Quality Council 2008 Leaning Industrial Mechanic’s Program “Pursuing Excellence”

47 © Health Quality Council 2008 Leaning Industrial Mechanic’s Program “Pursuing Excellence”

48 © Health Quality Council 2008 Leaning Industrial Mechanic’s Program “Pursuing Excellence”

49 © Health Quality Council 2008 SIAST - Lessons Learned Plant the seed early Find and support champions Don’t go it alone Find quick wins Leverage success Communicate effectively and frequently Educate, educate, educate Remain focused and determined

50 © Health Quality Council 2008 SIAST - Future Direction Industrial Division –Expansion of lean practices –Self sufficiency –Education and training (Green belts) Registration Services –Registration process –Student transcript process –Waitlist management

51 © Health Quality Council 2008 Potential Post-Secondary Applications Facility maintenance Care-taking services Food services Finance, procurement and inventory control Student registration and transcript processes IT processes (student and staff course management, libraries) Classroom scheduling Research and publications

52 © Health Quality Council 2008 Q & A Keith Willoughby, Denis Caron,


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