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Using Archetype theory to outsell competitors Presentation for FDIN Packaging conference 16 th June 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "Using Archetype theory to outsell competitors Presentation for FDIN Packaging conference 16 th June 2011."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Using Archetype theory to outsell competitors Presentation for FDIN Packaging conference 16 th June 2011

3 Insight Idea Insight into a consumer need A great idea that meets this need Execution An effective way of communicating that links these What is important in new product development? Packaging a key component here – should be central to execution not an after thought/ bolt- on, especially with FMCG brands

4 Why is packaging such a vital communication channel? 2. Enduring 3. Expressive 1.Immediate 2. Enduring 3. Expressive

5 Image 1. Immediate Packaging is highly visible. Other channels can engage but not everyone will see them In addition, packaging is highly intuitive. In our time poor, info overload world we often have to make quick decisions about complicated things which means our subconscious brain processing plays a much more important role than our conscious decision making Familiar sights and sounds - often expressed as on- pack symbols/signs - help this short circuiting process eg water/blue = cleansing eg white = purity eg green leaf = natural

6 Image 2. Enduring Packaging is ‘brand in the hand’ – real, tangible, permanent Allows consumer time to absorb message – often handled/seen more than once Design can be iconic (of a moment in culture) and enduring over time

7 Image 3. Expressive Packaging can deploy all the sensory expression elements that are powerful communicators of emotion – colour, texture, shape, sound (when opened), words Good design can distil the essence of the idea/brand and express it in a way that connects emotionally with the target

8 So, how do you extract the maximum value from your packaging?

9 Need to ensure you have the right insight into the consumer need to feed into design development The need may not be obvious or articulated –Have to go broader and deeper Need to observe and listen for the subconscious needs –Listen to what people mean, not what they say –Need to look at what they do, as well as what they say they do Look for the emotional need and the potential emotional benefit –Unique emotional benefits as powerful, if not more so, than functional benefits which in some sectors are easy for other brands to copy Need to understand the context in which the brand operates –Meaning doesn’t come from brand alone but the bigger picture of underlying trends, competitive framework, expectations etc it works within Exploring the subconscious, emotional and wider context drives our approach to design development

10 Insight-fuelled design inputs 2 CONSUMER BRAND CONTEXT TOOL Ethnographic study Used to understand decision hierarchies; how people buy and use TOOL Ethnographic study Used to understand decision hierarchies; how people buy and use TOOL Need state analysis Used to decode the needs and wants pack must communicate TOOL Need state analysis Used to decode the needs and wants pack must communicate TOOL Archetype design wheel Used to steer brand style and tone of voice TOOL Archetype design wheel Used to steer brand style and tone of voice TOOL Visual equity analysis Used to discover key identifiers, signifiers and what can be changed TOOL Visual equity analysis Used to discover key identifiers, signifiers and what can be changed TOOL Trends forecast and cultural insight Used to ensure the brand communicates in a relevant way TOOL Trends forecast and cultural insight Used to ensure the brand communicates in a relevant way TOOL In-situ audit Used to understand the environment the pack must stand out and differentiate within TOOL In-situ audit Used to understand the environment the pack must stand out and differentiate within How do people buy and use? What drives desire? How do consumers recognise the brand? What is the brand’s role in the world, what makes it tick? TOOL Semiotic analysis Used to understand how to convey meaning implicitly; how to observe and break category conventions TOOL Semiotic analysis Used to understand how to convey meaning implicitly; how to observe and break category conventions TOOL Sustainability checklist Used to create future-fit responsible design – structure, graphics, substrates, information TOOL Sustainability checklist Used to create future-fit responsible design – structure, graphics, substrates, information Leveraging societal trends and themes Category, channel and competitor context Sustainability demands and expectations

11 So, why is Archetype theory worth a closer look?

12 What are Archetypes? If consumers assess packaging like this… –“The instantaneous assessment of your product upon the shelf is the product of highly complex perceptual processes that trace back to the roots of human consciousness itself” (Evenson Design Group, California) Then we need an insight tool that allows us to tap into these roots of human consciousness. This is Archetype theory…. A set of universal images and ideas that have shaped our psychology –“There are forms and images that occur all over the earth as constituents of myths, and at the same time as individual products of unconscious origin. These are interpreted and hard wired by our psyches” (Jung)

13 How can they help? Rich in meaning –Stem from neuropsychological drivers – the basic needs we have –Use stories rich in symbols and cues Cross international borders –Express universal needs, not culturally specific (though may need culturally sensitive execution) Easily accessible –We ‘get them’ easily because they work subconsciously/ instinctively and we are used to them (they repeat in all other cultural material eg films, books etc) Archetypes help build firm foundations for a strong brand because they connect with people in a meaningful, accessible and engaging way

14 How Archetypes express our fundamental driving needs Stability BelongingIndependence and personal growth Mastery

15 Not a new idea but a useful tool We already think of brands as distinctive personalities –Easier to develop a relationship with a person –Easier to be drawn to a brand with a strong, compelling purpose based on their character –Eg Disney, Nike, Apple Archetypes can help with… –Identifying new opportunities - what archetypes are the existing brands? Any room for a new type? –Defining a differentiated personality for the brand (whether existing or new) –Connecting the identified consumer need with a clear brand story that addresses the need both functionally and emotionally –Guiding consistent brand behaviour and expression – how should the brand behave, look, talk? A robust framework to minimise risk and accelerate development

16 Tailoring Archetype theory specifically for design development Most Archetype marketing theory so far has focused on helping brands define their brand and then guiding them on how best to express this through advertising –Easier to express archetype characters and their stories through a moving medium There has been little, if any, written about how to express Archetype theory through the more static medium of design/packaging Yet we know that packaging is a crucial avenue for brand expression And that Archetype theory can help us here by: –Tapping into consumers’ subconscious memory structures by using the right subliminal design codes So, how did we set about developing our own Archetypal design rules?

17 UNDERSTANDING Revisited the psychology behind 01 ANALYSIS Broken down archetypes into their constituent attributes 02 EXTRACTION Extracted & built on design cues from archetype theory 03 SYNTHESIS Overlaid these design cues onto the different attributes 04 INSPIRATION Used enhanced attributes to extrapolate design directions most relevant to archetype 05 A 5 stage approach

18 Process in motion for The Jester

19 The Jester archetype Is a trickster Lives in the moment Can defuse a situation Likes pranks Is rebellious Values enjoyment Pokes fun at the Establishment Is life & soul of party Craves attention is one of the people Lets it rip Is free wheeling Makes you laugh Is disruptive Is fun Makes mischief

20 Breaking down The Jester archetype into its constituent pillars Social AnarchicEgalitarian Life & soul of party Needs an audience Mischievous & Humorous Pokes fun at the Establishment Lets it rip – speaks mind without fear of reprisal In touch with inner child Laughter, pranks & jokes Not pompous Easy for all to grasp – across rank Spontaneous Lives in moment Impulsive Turns situations upside down eg sad to happy Transformative THE JESTER ARCHETYPE Unexpected Disruptive Common symbols Simple characters Fun Makes you smile Warm Engaging See effect in motion Trick of the eye/ optical effect Unsymmetrical Unruly INVOLVING RULE BREAKING TRANSFORM- ATIVE UNSTRUCTURED & ENERGETIC PLAYFUL & CELEBRATORY POPULARIST Overlaying design cuesTranslating these into design directions/strands

21 Bringing it all together: the Dragon Rouge design wheel

22 Some examples of what we mean

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24 McDonalds Elementary - Bright, bold colours and basic shapes Child appeal - Happy meals utilise Disney characters and using McDonalds own clown, Ronald McDonald Elementary - Iconic ‘Golden Arches’ work as branding shorthand

25 Coke (Hand) Crafted - Throughout its’ history the Coca Cola bottle has always been crafted with smooth, elegant, tactile contours and the use of glass helps to enforce the brand’s durability and quality Gentle - Reflected in the both the easy-flowing, rounded, ‘script’ typography used for the logo and the fluid graphic device that sits alongside

26 Aveeno Natural - Neutral colour palette with muted finish Natural - Oat stalk visual reinforces this is a range based on a natural ingredient Simple & consistent - Consideration has been given to the space around type and images which helps convey simplicity Simple & consistent - Clear and consistent hierarchy, with the logo always followed by the ‘boxed’ product variant, helps conveys this is a straightforward brand

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28 Pringles Unstructured and energetic – ‘Unruly’ product shot Popularist – The man character Transformative – Strong colours, bold ‘X’ graphic and central taste explosion device all signal this is a range of big experiential flavour Playful & celebratory – Harnessing special occasions eg ‘Merry Pringles’ special edition pack

29 Ben & Jerry’s Rule breaking – Variant names (and non-food colours) that reference current/social affairs, often with tongue-in-cheek tone: would else but Ben & Jerry’s would bring politics into ice-cream?! Involving – Conversational tone with back of pack competitions to encourage consumer generated flavours

30 Pepsi Transformative – Often backgrounds have optical illusion effect Unstructured & energetic – Constantly evolving backgrounds keep design fresh and interesting Playful & celebratory – Limited edition name for Halloween

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32 Red Bull Ruthless – Bulls are shown in head-to-head combat Sharp – Angular lines and constantly fighting bulls provide sense of restless energy, momentum and ‘edginess’ to design Powerful – Many cues which include: - use of animal revered for its strength - strong contrasting colours - concentrated format (implies powerful liquid within) Encouraging – Red Bull sponsored ‘extreme sports’ events enable consumers to live the competitive, ambitious, restless nature of the brand themselves

33 Tampax Protective – Uppercase logo looks strong and reassuring Functional & resilient – Packaging also includes bold, functional claims on the effectiveness of the product Protective – Delicate elements on the packaging (eg flowers, pearls etc) implicitly convey what the brand claims to protect – your femininity and freshness

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35 Nivea Friendly – Rounded script typography element and tin. Tin feels good in the hand and small version fits easily in handbag too Down to earth – Minimal design elements help position convey this as a beauty staple with no pretences Reassuring – Old fashioned/classic crème formats eg tin/tubes – same as it’s always been

36 Carling Real – Use of black and white as key colour palette helps convey this is a straightforward brand that ‘tells it how it is’ Inclusive – Product benefit conveyed as a taste all will enjoy Popularist – Uses well-known English symbol of a lion, uniting its drinkers around a certain type of Englishness

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38 Perrier Other worldly – Perrier often ‘reinvents’ itself with special edition packs that are quite outlandish, celebratory and fun Energising – Bottle often looks cool to touch temping you with refreshing and uplifting product experience within Transformative – Clear bottle allows effervescence of product to shine through Secondary pack elements (eg sleeve) give ‘watery’ optical effect

39 Soap & Glory Transformative – Shiny silver packs imply products’ ability to lift your complexion Harmonious – Design unites seemingly disparate elements of 50s imagery, bold contemporary graphics and distinctive language to create coherent and consistent whole Awe-inspiring – ‘Magic’ effects being claimed in old-style, sensational ‘headline’ manner Intuitive – Language of claims and names demonstrate brand deeply understands feminine wiles and beauty needs

40 In summary

41 Emotion is all Consumer + Brand 20% Brain 80% Heart

42 Emotion is all Essential to connect quickly and intuitively with potential consumers –Emotion helps brands short-circuit more rational processing and cut through the clutter Brands that offer compelling and differentiated emotional benefits are more powerful –Consumers think they will receive a bigger reward (eg not just a meal on the table but being recognised as a great mum) Food and drink is probably one of the most emotional of categories as it touches the most basic human needs and drivers Archetypes help to connect up psychology and neuroscience through the use of a profoundly emotional story –Helps us access our deepest emotional needs

43 Harnessing the emotional pulling power of packaging Packaging is a key channel for emotive brand expression –Immediate –Enduring –Expressive So, when and how should you be looking at packaging? When packaging functionality is a core part of the idea (which it often is) then it tends to be built in early But very often it’s left until later – and the focus is on defining the need and generating ideas. But these won’t work without the great way of connecting them – and design is a good way of capturing this (rather than advertising line). Realistically, it’s more useful these days Need to consider the communication/packaging aspect earlier. Need to ensure there is a clear integration into the whole process from the start – not added on later.

44 Making packaging work even harder for your brand – one final thought 80% of Apple customers keep their packaging for 2 years or longer Packaging is the most long lasting marketing tool. It goes on and on communicating the brand’s identity How can one maximise the branding and marketing value of packaging – to make it more sustainable/ get more marketing impact from the same amount? Not just about recycling etc but building in ongoing/ secondary usage –Eg recipe cards; storage containers; building blocks; entertainment; etc

45 Telephone +44 (0)


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