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Social Networking, Contin’d Megan Kilgore (a.k.a. Other Megan) New Media Issues 24 July 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Social Networking, Contin’d Megan Kilgore (a.k.a. Other Megan) New Media Issues 24 July 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Social Networking, Contin’d Megan Kilgore (a.k.a. Other Megan) New Media Issues 24 July 2012

2 Adults and Social Network Websites Amanda Lenhart | Pew Internet 2009 Use of social networking sites is on the rise.

3 Adults and Social Network Websites Amanda Lenhart | Pew Internet 2009 Users of social networking sites are: Equally likely to be men or women More likely to be young More likely to be students More likely to be African American or Hispanic than white

4 Adults and Social Network Websites Amanda Lenhart | Pew Internet 2009 Half of social network users have profiles on MySpace 50% of adult social network users age 18 and older are on MySpace 22% of adult social network users have an account on Facebook 6% have an account on LinkedIn 2% have an account on Yahoo…Ya-who? 1% each have accounts on YouTube and Classmates.com

5 Adults and Social Network Websites Amanda Lenhart | Pew Internet 2009 More than half of adult social network users have more than one profile online. 51% of social network users have two or more online profiles 43% have only one online profile Among social network users with multiple profiles: 83% have those profiles on different sites 17% have those profiles on one site, which they use to…

6 Adults and Social Network Websites Amanda Lenhart | Pew Internet 2009 …stalk their exes.

7 Adults and Social Network Websites Amanda Lenhart | Pew Internet 2009 Actually… 24% have multiple profiles so they can keep up with friends on different sites 19% have multiple profiles to separate the personal and the professional 6% just use different sites 4% have different profiles for different parts of their personality 4% have older profiles on sites they do not use anymore One in ten internet users have deleted an online profile.

8 Adults and Social Network Websites Amanda Lenhart | Pew Internet 2009 Personal use of social networks seems to be more prevalent than professional use 89% use their online profiles to keep up with friends 57% use their profile to make plans with friends 49% use them to make new friends

9 Adults and Social Network Websites Amanda Lenhart | Pew Internet 2009 Most, but not all adult social network users are privacy conscious: 60% of adult social network users restrict access to their profiles so that only their friends can see it. 43% of adults think it would be pretty easy for someone to find out who they are from their profile 23% of teens say it would be pretty easy 20% of adults think that it would be difficult for someone to find out who they are 36% of teens say it would be difficult for someone to find out who they are

10 Adults and Social Network Websites Amanda Lenhart | Pew Internet 2009 During the 2008 presidential campaign, online social network sites were used for political information seeking, declarations and organization.

11 Adults and Social Network Websites Amanda Lenhart | Pew Internet 2009 Young people are much more likely than older adults to use social networks. 75% of online adults 18-24 have a profile on a social network site 57% of online adults 25-34 30% of online adults 35-44 19% of online adults 45-54 10% of online adults 55-64 7% of online adults 65 and older

12 Adults and Social Network Websites Amanda Lenhart | Pew Internet 2009 Social networking remains a phenomenon of the young… …However, the share of adult internet users who have a profile on an online social network site more than quadrupled in from 2005 to 2009.

13 The Future of Social Relations Janna Anderson, Lee Rainie | Pew Internet 2010 895 technology experts (stakeholders and critics) surveyed in an effort to predict the future of the Internet Respondents assessed “tension pairs” of 2020 scenarios; this report focuses on one pair

14 The Future of Social Relations Janna Anderson, Lee Rainie | Pew Internet 2010 Scenario 1 “In 2020, when I look at the big picture and consider my personal friendships, marriage and other relationships, I see that the internet has mostly been a positive force on my social world. And this will only grow more true in the future.” Scenario 2 “In 2020, when I look at the big picture and consider my personal friendships, marriage and other relationships, I see that the internet has mostly been a negative force on my social world. And this will only grow more true in the future.”

15 The Future of Social Relations Janna Anderson, Lee Rainie | Pew Internet 2010 85% agreed with scenario 1 14% agreed with scenario 2 1% did not respond

16 The Future of Social Relations Janna Anderson, Lee Rainie | Pew Internet 2010 Respondents were also encouraged to elaborate on their choices by responding to the following open-ended question: “Share your view of the internet’s influence on the future of human relationships in 2020 – what is likely to stay the same and what will be different in human and community relations?”

17 The Future of Social Relations Janna Anderson, Lee Rainie | Pew Internet 2010 Open-ended responses were grouped into several themes: Ability to maintain larger social networks with tools like email and social networking sites Concern that use of the Internet for social connection does not foster deep personal relationships Geography no longer an obstacle to human communication – Immigration experiences are different now that people can more easily check in back home – Internet removes many constraints of time and space We lose time online – time that could be, should be spent on our relationships

18 The Future of Social Relations Janna Anderson, Lee Rainie | Pew Internet 2010 New ways to interact could inspire more tolerance and global understanding, or they may allow people to silo themselves and incite more intolerance or dangerously limit people’s worldview Criminals, terrorists, governments, and commercial interests may have a negative influence on the evolution of social networks between now and 2020 Most of the change will occur in social networks with relationships that are more casual and weaker – not among those with the strongest personal ties

19 Twitter Use 2012 Aaron Smith, Joanna Brenner | Pew Internet 2012

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22 How Twitter Evolved from 2006 to 2011 Leo Widrich | Buffer | June 8, 2011 February 2006: Twttr is founded July 2006: Twttr is available to the public September 2006: Twitter introduces its API October 2006: Sign Up for Twitter without your phone number December 2006: The first person to get fired on Twitter

23 How Twitter Evolved from 2006 to 2011 Leo Widrich | Buffer | June 8, 2011 February 2007: Your Twitter username is in the center March 2007: Twitter’s first tipping point at SXSW April 2007: Twitter gets incorporated May 2007: You can block others and Twitter gets a mobile site Twitter gets an @replies column

24 How Twitter Evolved from 2006 to 2011 Leo Widrich | Buffer | June 8, 2011 June 2007: Dell joins Twitter and paves the way for Twitter for businesses July 2007: Get Twitter “Followers” August 2007: Twitter Profile Search goes live September 2007: Tracking Twitter alias #Hashtags goes live November 2007: Twitter appears in CSI

25 How Twitter Evolved from 2006 to 2011 Leo Widrich | Buffer | June 8, 2011 February 2008: Reply to others immediately April 2008: Twitter launches in Japan July 2008: Twitter moves into their new HQ September 2008: Twitter gets Trending Topics

26 How Twitter Evolved from 2006 to 2011 Leo Widrich | Buffer | June 8, 2011 March 2009: Twitter introduces “Suggested Users” October 2009: Twitter launches Twitter Lists November 2009: Orange launches first Photosharing service for Twitter Twitter unveils the new native RT function

27 How Twitter Evolved from 2006 to 2011 Leo Widrich | Buffer | June 8, 2011 February 2010: Twitter unveils its staggering growth figures to the world March 2010: You can now add your location to your Tweets April 2010: Twitter launches “Promoted Tweets” August 2010: Twitter Launches their own Tweet Button September 2010: Twitter introduces the “New Twitter” October 2010: Twitter starts to push “Promoted Accounts” live

28 How Twitter Evolved from 2006 to 2011 Leo Widrich | Buffer | June 8, 2011 May 2011: Twitter launches the Follow Button May 2011: Twitter launches its own photosharing service June 2011: Twitter gets integrated into iOS 5 Twitter launches its own link shortening service

29 How Twitter Will Change the Way we Live Steve Johnson | Time Magazine Business | June 5, 2009 Twitter doesn’t seem very impressive at first… …actually, it’s more interesting than it sounds “…we’ve jury-rigged the system to do things that its creators never dreamed of. In short, the most fascinating thing about Twitter is not what it's doing to us. It's what we're doing to it.”

30 How Twitter Will Change the Way we Live Steve Johnson | Time Magazine Business | June 5, 2009 The Open Conversation Hacking Education, Manhattan, March 2009 Attendees used #hackedu to tweet about what was being said in the conference; tweets appeared on a screen behind the presenters Turned into a “shadow discussion” happening behind the live discussion going on in the room Conversation continued for months after the conference

31 How Twitter Will Change the Way we Live Steve Johnson | Time Magazine Business | June 5, 2009 The Super-Fresh Web Three aspects of Twitter combine to make it a powerful, ultra- current search tool: Social Networking Live Searching Link Sharing

32 How Twitter Will Change the Way we Live Steve Johnson | Time Magazine Business | June 5, 2009 From Toasters to Microwaves Twitter users and third party companies have done more to redesign Twitter than the company itself: Users developed the conventions of the # to designate keywords and the @ symbol to reply to other users Third party software companies have developed apps and services to use Twitter on mobile devices, share images and links more easily, connect with nearby users, etc.

33 How Twitter Will Change the Way we Live Steve Johnson | Time Magazine Business | June 5, 2009 End-User Innovation U.S. economists bemoan the decrease in patents and Ph.D.s that originate in the U.S. Original inventions are made by only a small number of people, but then users and third parties expand on those inventions with their own innovative tools to change how we use them

34 Why Twitter Will Endure David Carr | New York Times | January 1, 2010 He also thought Twitter was dumb and only started using it out of professional necessity. Quickly changed his tune…there’s still the inane… However, “by carefully curating the people you follow, Twitter becomes an always-on data stream from really bright people in their respective fields, whose tweets are often full of links to incredibly vital, timely information.”

35 Why Twitter Will Endure David Carr | New York Times | January 1, 2010 Twitter will endure because it has changed the way we seek out information on the Web. Do you think this is true?

36 Mob Rule! How Users Took Over Twitter Steven Levy | Wired Magazine | October 19, 2009 On its own, Twitter is essentially a messaging service that “does little more than circulate bursts of text limited to 140 characters to a list of people who have chosen to receive them,” but it has come very far very fast. “Its users defined it.”

37 Mob Rule! How Users Took Over Twitter Steven Levy | Wired Magazine | October 19, 2009 Twitter’s creators made a series of deliberate decisions that allowed users to innovate, which have ultimately led to its enormous success: Commitment to simplicity Asymmetry between writers and followers Open to third party developers from the beginning

38 Mob Rule! How Users Took Over Twitter Steven Levy | Wired Magazine | October 19, 2009 Twitter Envy Facebook—the ability to make status updates visible to public, Facebook Lite Google—Pubsubhubbub

39 Mob Rule! How Users Took Over Twitter Steven Levy | Wired Magazine | October 19, 2009 Problem: How to profit from Twitter? Hired some big talent with investment capital, but every “enhancement” they make comes under enormous scrutiny Need to find a balance between owning their product and enabling end-user innovation How do you think Twitter can be as profitable as they say they can be without ruining the experience its users have come to love?

40 The Twitter Explosion Paul Farhi | American Journalism Review | April/May 2009 Twitter explosion is thanks in no small part to its adoption by journalists and news organizations “Some well-known news-media names now have Twitter followings that are almost as large as the circulation of their newspapers or viewership of their TV shows.” Do you think their Twitter followings are still “almost as large”?

41 The Twitter Explosion Paul Farhi | American Journalism Review | April/May 2009 George Stephanopoulos (ABC News, Good Morning America)— more than 564,000 followers (1,767,583 as of 7/21) David Gregory (NBC, Meet the Press)— 528,356 followers (1,540,787 as of 7/21) Rachel Maddow (MSNBC)—506,951 followers (2,162,112 as of 7/21) Scott Simon (NPR)—360,861 followers (1,230,387 as of 7/21) David Pogue (New York Times)—306,371 followers (1,432,016 as of 7/21)

42 The Twitter Explosion Paul Farhi | American Journalism Review | April/May 2009 George Stephanopoulos (ABC News, Good Morning America)— more than 564,000 followers (1,767,583 as of 7/21) David Gregory (NBC, Meet the Press)— 528,356 followers (1,540,787 as of 7/21) Rachel Maddow (MSNBC)—506,951 followers (2,162,112 as of 7/21) Scott Simon (NPR)—360,861 followers (1,230,387 as of 7/21) David Pogue (New York Times)—306,371 followers (1,432,016 as of 7/21)

43 The Twitter Explosion Paul Farhi | American Journalism Review | April/May 2009 Benefits of Twitter in Journalism Speed and brevity Tweet from anywhere – Is reporting via Twitter appropriate for all kinds of events? News tip line

44 The Twitter Explosion Paul Farhi | American Journalism Review | April/May 2009 January 15, 2009 Janis Krums tweets a photo of U.S. Airways flight 1549 which crashed into the Hudson River

45 The Twitter Explosion Paul Farhi | American Journalism Review | April/May 2009 May 1, 2011—Sohaib Athar live tweets raid that killed Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad, Pakistan

46 The Twitter Explosion Paul Farhi | American Journalism Review | April/May 2009 Drawbacks There’s a lot of garbage to sift through 140-character limit and shortened links New ethical territory—think before you tweet

47 Seems Stupid Until You Try It: Press Coverage of Twitter, 2006 −9 Arceneaux & Weiss | New Media & Society 2010 Uses social construction theory and diffusion of innovations theory to explore public response to Twitter by analyzing its press coverage from 2006-2009 “Purposeful sampling” of newspapers and news wires, magazines and blogs published between March 1, 2006 and March 31, 2009 from the LexisNexis Academic database Used grounded theory approach to identify categories and develop themes

48 Seems Stupid Until You Try It: Press Coverage of Twitter, 2006 −9 Arceneaux & Weiss | New Media & Society 2010 Findings Explanation Theme – Brevity – Speed Positive Themes – New sensibility – Commercial use – Civic use Negative Themes – Information overload – Acceptable practices – Unanticipated consequences – Twitter spam; identity fraud

49 Seems Stupid Until You Try It: Press Coverage of Twitter, 2006 −9 Arceneaux & Weiss | New Media & Society 2010 Conclusion: There was some skepticism, but coverage, and therefore public reaction, was overwhelmingly positive. If they can figure out a way to make money off it, Twitter won’t go anywhere any time soon.

50 Pixie Dust & The Mountain of Mediocrity Kathy Sierra | Gaping Void Blog | June 7, 2011 There’s no magic “pixie dust” marketing solution that consistently bridges the gap between popularizing a brand and getting people to buy. When marketing a great product—one that users love—the power of social media doesn’t come from product-to-user engagement but user-to-user/user-to-potential user engagement. Latest “pixie-dust” marketing solution is “gamification”— applying principles of game design to non-game activities.

51 Pixie Dust & The Mountain of Mediocrity Kathy Sierra | Gaping Void Blog | June 7, 2011 Gamification can be done really well, but it’s currently being done at a superficial level that’s just annoying. Don’t be that brand! Gamification should be used to empower users, to make them feel better at something they want to be better at.


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