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Growing Vegetables A Watercolor and Crayon Piece.

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Presentation on theme: "Growing Vegetables A Watercolor and Crayon Piece."— Presentation transcript:

1 Growing Vegetables A Watercolor and Crayon Piece

2 Art Fundamentals Covered: Perspective – What we can see and what we don’t Resistance Watercolor Piece – How water rolls off substances like wax from a crayon. Rule of Three – using three to create a visual balance Variety– makes a piece more interesting

3 Perspective: There is so much more than what we see. If we are on the shore of an ocean we see the water. When we are under the water we see life.

4 Perspective: There is so much more than what we see. When we are in a garden we may see the stalk of a vegetable. If we pull the stalk up, we get a treat.

5 Rule of Three Rule of Three – using three to create a visual balance Studies prove that if you place elements of your artwork along natural lines it becomes more balanced and enables a viewer to interact with it more naturally. People’s eyes are usually drawn to one of the intersection points rather than the center of the piece.

6 Rule of Odds in Composition One of the simplest ways to make a composition more dynamic is to have an odd number in the composition, say three, five, or seven, rather than an even number, say two, four, or six. It's called the Rule of Odds. Having an odd number of things in a composition means your eye and brain can't pair them up or group them easily. There's some how always one thing left over, which keeps your eyes moving across the composition.

7 Variety Makes Art Interesting In order to keep your composition interesting changing shapes can help. Too much variety may be confusing or chaotic and make the viewer uncomfortable, while too much harmony may be boring. Variety is achieved by differences in how the elements of art are used. For example, in a line drawing, a combination of thick and thin lines may be more interesting than all thick or all thin lines.

8 Wax and Water Don’t Mix Dry Wax from a crayon acts as a resistant to watercolor paint. No matter how much watercolor you put on the crayon wax, it won’t change color. It will run off the wax and find places on the paper to color instead.

9 Step One – With pencil put your name on your paper; draw a horizon line; draw a carrot, leek, radish Step Two- Trace over the pencil lines with crayons, including the horizon line Step Three – Watercolor paint

10 Completed Example

11 Resources composition-rules_2.htm#step-heading Compositionstudy.com “Teaching Art with Books Kids Love,” by Darcie Clark Frohardt


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