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A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman. A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman This presentation was developed in total by; Lee “Batman” Batterman.

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Presentation on theme: "A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman. A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman This presentation was developed in total by; Lee “Batman” Batterman."— Presentation transcript:

1 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman

2 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman This presentation was developed in total by; Lee “Batman” Batterman Umpire Consultant for CA-D62 Little League And was initially meant to be used in our local training program. However, due to the large number of request for the presentation, the developer has decided to release it for general use. The use of this presentation, or any edited form of this presentation, is granted by the developer to any individual or group. The developer understands that once released, the control of content and display are lost. The developer asks that the HEADER be maintained.

3 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman

4 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 1.The hands are considered part of the bat, and NO base shall be awarded if the Batter is hit in the hands by the Pitch? True or False

5 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman False The hands are part of a person's body. If a pitch hits the batter's hands the ball is dead; if he/she swung at the pitch, a strike is called (NOT a foul). If he/she was avoiding the pitch, he/she is awarded first base. Rule 2.00 Touch, Strike, Person, 5.09 (a)

6 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.oo: Definitions TOUCH: To touch a player or an umpire is to touch any part of the player or umpire's body, clothing or equipment. A STRIKE: Is a legal pitch which meets any of these conditions – (e) Touches the batter's person as the batter strikes at it (dead ball) “The Right Call“ Casebook – If, while swinging, the ball hits [strikes] the batter, it is a dead ball, strike INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS – This further demonstrates that hands are part of the batter’s person, not part of the bat

7 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.oo: Definitions (Continued): PERSON: A player or an umpire or any part of the body, clothing or equipment. Rule The ball becomes dead and runners advance one base, or return to their bases without liability to be put out, when – (a) a pitched ball touches a batter, or the batter's clothing, while in a legal batting position; runners, if forced, advance

8 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule The batter becomes a runner and is entitled to first base without ‘liability to be put out, when – (b) the batter is touched by a pitched ball which the batter is not attempting to hit unless (1) The ball is in the strike zone when it touches the batter, or (2) the batter makes no attempt to avoid being touched by the ball; NOTE: If the ball is in the strike zone when it touches the batter, it shall be called a strike, whether or not the batter tries to avoid the ball. If the ball is outside the strike zone when it touches the batter, it shall be called a ball if that batter makes no attempt to avoid being touched. APPROVED RULING: When the batter is touched by a pitched ball which does not entitle that batter to first base, the ball is dead and no runner may advance.

9 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 2. The batter-runner must turn to his right after over-sliding or over-running first base? True or False

10 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman False The batter-runner may turn left or right, provided that no matter which way he/she turns, there is NO attempt to advance. An attempt is a judgment made by the umpire. The requirement is that the runner must immediately return to first after over running or over sliding the base Rule 7.08 (j)

11 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule Any runner is out when – (j) failing to return at once to first base after overrunning or over- sliding that base. If attempting to run to second the runner is out when tagged. If after overrunning or over-sliding first base, the runner starts toward the dugout, or toward a [field] position, and fails to return to first base at once, that runner is out on appeal, when said runner or the base is tagged. “The Right Call” Casebook -- Comment: A runner may turn in any direction after reaching first base even on a base on balls. Establish the runner’s intent to determine if he/she may be put out before returning to first. If an out call is appropriate, the runner must be tagged.

12 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 7.08(j) – (Continued) INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: “Attempting to run to second” can mean as little as a step in that direction. The intent of the runner, even momentarily, determines whether or not the runner is in jeopardy of being tagged out. If, after overrunning first base, the runner turns to the right, well into foul territory, and notices that the ball was overthrown. Even though the runner is clearly in foul territory, if he/she makes any move as if to run to second, he/she is in jeopardy of being tagged out.

13 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 3. If the batter ‘breaks’ his wrists when swinging, or while attempting to ‘Check’ the swing… it's a strike. True or False

14 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman False A strike is a judgment by the Umpire as to whether the batter attempted to strike the ball. Breaking the wrists, or the barrel of the bat crossing the plate, are simply guides to making the judgment of an attempt, these are not rules. Rule 2.00 Strike

15 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions: STRIKE is a legal pitch which meets any of these conditions – (a) Is struck at by the batter and missed;

16 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 4. If a batted ball hits the plate first, then settles in foul territory… it's a foul ball. True or False

17 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Even tough the plate is in fair territory, there is nothing special about it If a batted ball hits the Plate, it is treated like any other batted ball that touches Fair territory then roles Foul. True Rule 2.00 Strike

18 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions: FOUL BALL is a batted ball that settles on foul territory between home and first base, or between home and third base, or that bounds past first or third base on or over foul territory, or that first falls on foul territory beyond first base or third base, or that while on or over foul territory, touches the person of an umpire or player, or any object foreign to the natural ground “The Right Call” Casebook – Comment Remember when you call “foul”, you live with that call. You can not change a foul call after it is made You Can Not Un-ring that BELL

19 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 5. The batter cannot be called out for interference if he is in the batter's box. It’s called the “Batter’s Box” for a reason… because it belongs to the Batter True or False

20 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman False The batter's box is not a safety zone. A batter could be called out for interference if the umpire judges that interference could, or should, have been avoided. The batter is protected while in the box for a short period of time. After he has had time to react to the play he could be called for interference if he does not move out of the box and interferes with a play. Rule 2.00 Interference 6.06 (c)

21 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Many people believe the batter's box is a safety zone for the batter. It is not. The batter MAY be called out for interference although he is within the box. The key words, impede, hinder, confuse or obstruct apply to this situation and MAY be considered An umpire must use Good Judgment. The batter cannot be expected to disappear. If he has time and a chance to avoid interference and does not, he is guilty. If he conducts himself like a batter after swinging, and is off-balance, he can't reasonably be expected to avoid a play at the plate.

22 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman However, after some time passes, if a play develops at the plate, the batter must get out of the box and avoid interference. The batter should always be called out when he INTERFERES and is outside the box A batter is responsible for his actions, BOTH inside and outside the Batter’s Box

23 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 INTERFERENCE -- Offensive Interference is an act by the team at bat which interferes with, obstructs, impedes, hinder or confuses any fielder attempting to make a play. If the umpire declares the batter, batter-runner or a runner out for interference, all other runners shall return to the last base that was, in the judgment of the umpire, legally touched at the time of the interference, unless otherwise provided by these rules INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: Interference does not have to be intentional for it to be called

24 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule A batter is out for illegal action when – (c) interfering with the catcher's fielding or throwing by stepping out of the batter's box or making any other movement that hinders the catcher’s play at home plate EXCEPTION: Batter is not out if any runner attempting to advance is put out, or if runner trying to score is called out for batter's interference. The Right Call Casebook -- Comment: Notice that there is no mention of intentional. Again, umpire’s judgment.

25 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule A batter is out for illegal action when – INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: If the batter interferes with the catcher, the plate umpire shall call interference The batter is out and the ball dead No player may advance on such interference (offensive interference) and all runners must return to the last base that was, in the judgment of the umpire, legally touched at the time of the interference.

26 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 6. The ball is “Live and in play”, on a Foul-Tip True or False

27 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman There is nothing foul about a foul-tip. If the ball hits the bat and goes sharp and direct to the catcher's hand or glove and is legally caught, it is a foul-tip by definition. A foul-tip is a strike and the ball is live. It is the same as a swing-and-miss. If the ball is not caught, it is a Foul Ball. If the foul-tip first hits the catcher somewhere other than the hand or glove, it is not a foul-tip, it is a Foul Ball. True Rule 2.00 Foul Tip

28 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions: FOUL TIP -- is a batted ball that goes sharp and direct from the bat to the catcher's hands [or glove] and is legally caught. It is not a foul tip unless caught and any foul tip that is caught is a strike, and the ball is in play. It is not a catch if it is a rebound, unless the ball has first touched the catcher's glove or hand. A foul tip can only be caught by the catcher The Right Call Casebook – Foul tip can only be caught by the catcher Play: Pitched ball goes sharply from the bat into the catcher’s mask and is then caught by the catcher Ruling: Foul ball. To be declared a foul tip, ball must go directly to the catcher’s glove or hand; it may rebound off the mask or chest and still be a foul tip

29 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions - FOUL TIP (Continued)– INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: The ball is alive and in play on a foul tip. Runners may advance as well as being thrown out on a foul tip. A rebound would be a ball batted sharply to the catcher that does not hit the mitt first, but is finally held by the catcher. This would not be a catch, but simply a foul ball, dead ball.

30 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 7. The batter may switch batter's boxes At anytime, even after two strikes. True or False

31 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman The batter can switch boxes at any time, provided he/she does not do it after the pitcher is set, ready to pitch or in motion. True Rule 6.06 (b)

32 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule A batter is out for illegal action when (b) stepping from one batter's box to the other while the pitcher is in position, ready to pitch; INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: This is intended to prevent the batter from jumping from one side to the other, thereby confusing the defense, not when the batter happens to step across home plate when first arriving for his/her at bat.

33 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 8. The Player who ‘Batted Out of Order’ is the person declared “OUT” after a proper Appeal is made True or False

34 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman False The PROPER batter is the one called out. Any hit or advance made by the Improper Batter or the runners due to the hit, walk, error or other reason is nullified. The next batter is the one who follows the Proper Batter… sometimes meaning, the player who was just called out. Rule 6.07 (b)

35 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule BATTING OUT OF TURN (Failure to Bat in Proper Order) (b) When an improper batter becomes a runner or is put out, and the defensive team appeals to the umpire before the first pitch to the next batter of either team, or before any play or attempted play, the umpire shall (1) declare the proper batter out; and (2) nullify any advance or score made because of a ball batted by the improper batter or because of the improper batter's advance to first base on a hit, an error, a base on balls, a hit batter or otherwise NOTE -- If a runner advances, while the improper batter is at bat, on a stolen base, balk, wild pitch or passed ball, such advance is legal

36 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule BATTING OUT OF TURN (Failure to Bat in Proper Order) (b) Continued: The Right Call Casebook – Play: Bases loaded, one out, or two outs, wrong batter steps into the box and strokes a triple, defense appeals, how many runs scored? Ruling: With one out, umpire calls out correct batter and returns all runners to the base they occupied at time of hit, no runs scored; with two outs, the umpire calls out correct batter for the third out and no runs scored. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: Appeal must be made before the next pitch, play or attempted play. Baseball and Softball treat this element differently

37 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 9. The batter may not overrun first base when he/she is awarded a Base-On-Balls. True or False

38 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman False Rule 7.08 simply states that a batter- runner must immediately return after overrunning first base. The rule doesn't state any exceptions as to how the player became a runner. It could be a hit, walk, error or dropped third strike. Rule 7.08 (c) (j)

39 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman In Little League the runner may overrun. In Professional baseball, he may not. To overrun means that the runners momentum carried him straight beyond the base after touching it. It does not mean to turn and attempt to advance. Nor does it mean that he stepped over it or stopped on it and then continued.

40 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule Any runner is out when – (c) that runner is tagged, when the ball is alive while off a base; EXCEPTION: A batter-runner cannot be tagged out after overrunning or over sliding first base if said runner returns immediately to the base. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: This includes an award of first base on a base on balls when the runner touches 1st and then steps off.

41 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule Any runner is out when – (j) failing to return at once to first base after overrunning or over-sliding that base. If attempting to run to second the runner is out when tagged. If after overrunning or over-sliding first base, the runner starts toward the dugout, or toward a position, and fails to return to first base at once, that runner is out on appeal, when said runner or the base is tagged. The Right Call Casebook -- Comment: A runner may turn in any direction after reaching first base even on a base on balls. Establish the runner’s intent to determine if he/she may be put out before returning to first. If an out call is appropriate, the runner must be tagged.

42 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 7.08 (j) Continued -- Any runner is out when – INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: “Attempting to run to second” can mean as little as a step in that direction. The intent of the runner, even momentarily, determines whether or not the runner is in jeopardy of being tagged out If, after overrunning first base, the runner turns to the right, well into foul territory, and notices that the ball was overthrown. Even though the runner is clearly in foul territory, if he/she makes any move as if to run to second, he/she is in jeopardy of being tagged out

43 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 10. The batter should NOT be called OUT for abandoning the base path if he doesn’t go directly to 1 st base after Ball 4, or Dropped 3 rd Strike (Majors and above) True or False

44 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman The Batter may attempt to advance to first base anytime prior to entering the dugout or dead ball area. The batter becomes a runner when awarded 1 st base on Ball 4. He also may advance under certain circumstances when the third strike is not caught (Majors and above). A runner makes his own base path to the base True Rule 6.08 (a) 6.09 (b)

45 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule The batter becomes a runner and is entitled to first base without liability to be put out (provided said runner advances to and touches first base) when – (a) four “balls” have been called by the umpire; Rule The batter becomes a runner when – (b) (JUNIOR/SENIOR/BIG LEAGUE BASEBALL/MAJOR/JUNIOR/SENIOR/BIG LEAGUE SOFTBALL) the third strike called by the umpire is not caught, providing (1) first base is unoccupied or (2) first base is occupied with two out; NOTE: A batter forfeits his/her opportunity to advance to first base when he/she enters the dugout or other dead ball area.

46 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 6.09(b) Continued -- The batter becomes a runner when – INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: Sometimes, the batter will take a few steps toward the dugout or his/her defensive position after the third strike without realizing that he/she can advance to first base. This would be perfectly legal. The batter is not “out of the baseline” or has not “abandoned his/her base” or any other explanation that the opposing manager will give you.

47 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 11. If the batter does not pull the bat out of the strike zone while in the BUNT position, it's an automatic strike. True or False

48 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman A strike is an attempt to HIT the ball. Simply holding the bat over the plate is NOT an attempt to hit. This is umpire judgment. False Rule 2.00 Strike, Bunt

49 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions -- STRIKE -- is a legal pitch which meets any of these conditions - (a) Is struck at by the batter and missed; (b) Is not struck at, if any part of the ball passes through any part of the strike zone;

50 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions Continued -- BUNT -- is a batted ball not swung at, but intentionally met with the bat and tapped slowly. The mere holding of the bat in the strike zone is not an attempted bunt. The Right Call Casebook – Comment: The key words are “Intentionally Met” & “Tapped Slowly” Comment #2: If no attempt is made to make contact with a ball outside the strike zone while in the bunting stance, it should be called a ball. An effort must be made to intentionally meet the ball with the bat.

51 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions Continued -- BUNT (Continued)– INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: When the batter squares around in a “bunt position”, there is no need for the batter to pull the bat back. If the pitched ball is out of the strike zone, it shall be called a “ball”. An effort must be made to intentionally meet the ball with the bat. If the pitch is IN the strike zone, and no attempt is made to met the ball, the pitch is a ‘Called Strike’ and not a ‘Swinging Strike’.

52 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 12. The batter is NOT out if a bunted ball hits the ground and immediately bounces back up and hits the bat while the batter is holding the bat. True or False

53 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman The rule says the BAT cannot hit the ball a second time. When the BALL hits the bat, it is not an out. Also, when the batter is still in the box when this happens, it's treated as simply a foul ball. If the batter is out of the box and the bat is over fair territory when the second hit occurs, the batter would be out. True Rule 6.05 (g)

54 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule The Batter is out when – (g) after hitting or bunting a fair ball, the bat hits the ball a second time in fair territory. The ball is dead and no runner may advance. If the batter-runner drops the bat and the ball rolls against the bat in fair territory and, in the umpire's judgment there was no intention to interfere with the course of the ball, the ball is alive and in play INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: The phrase “while holding the bat” has been removed from this rule. A bat hits the ball a second time in fair territory; the batter will be called out with the ball being dead immediately and runner(s) either return or stay at their time of pitch base(s).

55 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule The Batter is out when, Continued – The Right Call Casebook - Comment: Rule of thumb is… bat hits ball a second time versus ball hits bat a second time This is Umpire’s judgment on intent to interfere. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: If a bat is thrown into fair territory and interferes with a defensive player attempting to make a play, interference shall be called, whether intentional or not

56 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 13. The batter is out if his foot touches, or is on the plate, while making contact with the ball. True or False

57 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman To be out, the batter's foot must be ENTIRELY outside the box when making contact with the ball whether the ball goes fair or foul. He is NOT OUT if he does not contact the pitch. There is no statement about touching the plate. The toe could be on the plate and the heel could be touching the line of the box, which means the foot is not entirely outside the box. False Rule 6.06 (a)

58 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule A batter is out for illegal action when – (a) hitting the ball with one or both feet ON THE GROUND, ENTITRLY outside the batter's box; “The Right Call” Casebook – Comment: Fair or foul, if he/she meets (a) above, call the batter OUT

59 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 14. There is NO RULE that requires the Batter Runner to be in the “Runners Lane” … EVER … True or False

60 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman The runner must be out of the lane AND must interfere with the fielder taking the throw. He is not out simply for being outside the lane. He could be called for interference even while in the lane depending on his actions. This is a judgment call. The runner may need to step out of the lane a few steps before the base. If he is out of the lane the whole distance to the base and is hit with a throw, he may, or may not be out. True Rule 2.00 Interference 6.05 (j) 6.09 (j)

61 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions – INTERFERENCE Offensive interference is an act by the team at bat which interferes with, obstructs, impedes, hinder or confuses any fielder attempting to make a play. If the umpire declares the batter, batter-runner or a runner out for interference, all other runners shall return to the last base that was, in the judgment of the umpire, legally touched at the time of the interference, unless otherwise provided by these rules. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: Interference does not have to be intentional for it to be called.

62 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule A batter is out when – (j) in running the last half of the distance from home base to first base, while the ball is being fielded to first base, the batter- runner runs outside (to the right of) the three-foot line, or inside (to the left of) the foul line, and in the umpire's judgment in so doing interferes with the fielder taking the throw at first base; except that the batter-runner may run outside (to the right of) the three-foot line, or inside (to the left of) the foul line to avoid a fielder attempting to field a batted ball The Right Call Casebook – Play: Batter-runner hits a ground ball to the shortstop who throws to first. The throw pulls the first baseman up the line where he/she and the batter-runner collide. Ruling: The call is “That’s Nothing” What you have is a collision. Batter-runner was not out of baseline.

63 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 6.05 (j) Continued -- A batter is out when – INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: The lines marking the three-foot lane are a part of that lane and a batter-runner is required to have both feet within the three-foot lane or on the lines marking the lane. The batter-runner is permitted to exit the three-foot lane by means of a step, stride, reach or slide in the immediate vicinity of first base for the sole purpose of touching first base.

64 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 6.05 (j) Continued -- A batter is out when – The Right Call Casebook – Comment: It’s always interference if the catcher’s or pitcher’s throw hits the batter-runner when he/she is not in the “lane”. T/F? The lines that mark the “lane” are part of the “lane” and the interpretation to be made is that a runner is required to have both feet within the three foot “lane” or on the lines marking the “lane.” If the throw is accurate to the first baseman and in the umpire’s judgment the runner interfered with the first baseman, it is interference. There are two key elements to this rule that frequently are misunderstood: (1) the ball must be thrown in order for the runner to interfere with the “fielder taking the throw” and

65 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 6.05 (j) Continued -- A batter is out when – The Right Call Casebook – (2) the throw must be a “Quality” throw (reasonably catchable throw). A catcher who does not throw, or who throws well over the fielder’s head should not be rewarded by having interference called. A “catchable throw” would essentially be a throw that the baseman could catch it if the runner were not there. Rule It is interference by a batter or a runner when – (j) the runner fails to avoid a fielder who is attempting to field a batted ball, or intentionally interferes with a thrown ball,

66 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 15. A runner may slap hands and/or give high- fives to other players, after a homerun is hit over the fence. He may even deviate from the base path and give hand slaps along the dugout? True or False

67 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman The ball is dead on a homerun over the fence. You can't be put out while the ball is dead except when you pass another runner or Abandon the base path. The runner also creates his own base path as he proceeds around the track. True Rule 5.02, 7.05 (a), 7.08 (a)

68 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 5.02 – After the umpire calls "Play" the ball is alive and in play and remains alive and in play until, for legal cause, or at the umpire’s call of "Time" suspending play, the ball becomes dead. While the ball is dead, no player may be put out, no bases may be run and no runs may be scored, except that runners may advance one or more bases as the result of acts which occurred while the ball was alive (such as, but not limited to a balk, an overthrow, interference, or a home run or other fair ball hit out of the playing field)

69 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 5.02 Continues – The Right Call Casebook – Play: Runner on first, home plate umpire believing all play had ceased, turned his/her back on the pitcher to dust off home plate when: (a) runner steals second with no play being made; (b) pitcher catches runner standing off first talking with first base coach. Base umpire calls runner out Ruling: In both (a) and (b), put runner back on first. Although neither umpire technically called “time”, it was implied when the home plate umpire turned his/her back to the ball to dust off home plate. Anytime you clean the plate, call “time”. Then signal and call “play” to make the ball live again

70 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule Each runner including the batter- runner may, without liability to be put out, advance (a) to home base scoring a run, if a fair ball goes out of the playing field inflight and the runner touches all bases legally; or if a fair ball which, in the umpire’s judgment would have gone out of the playing field in flight (165 feet from home plate), is deflected by the act of a fielder in throwing a glove, cap, or any article of apparel;

71 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule Any runner is out when – (a) (1) running more than three feet away from his/her baseline to avoid being tagged, unless such action is to avoid interference with a fielder fielding a batted ball. A runner’s baseline is established when the tag attempt occurs and is a straight line from the runner to the base which he/she is attempting to reach; The Right Call Casebook – Comment When a play is being made on a runner, he/she establishes his/her base line as a straight line between his/her position and the base towards which he/she is moving..

72 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 7.08(a) Continues -- Any runner is out when – INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: Be aware that the base runner makes his/her own baseline as he/she progresses (or regresses) around the bases. Depending on the circumstances, his/her baseline frequently may change as the play develops

73 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 16. Tie goes to the runner. True or False

74 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman There is no such thing in the world of umpiring as a Tie. The runner is either Out or Safe. The Umpire MUST judge the status of the runner to be either out or safe. It is impossible to judge a Tie. False Rule 6.05 (j)

75 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule A batter is out when - (i) after hitting a fair ball, the batter-runner or first base is tagged before said batter-runner touches first base; or… Junior/.Senior/Big League; after a third strike as defined in Rule 6.09(b), the batter-runner or first base is tagged before said batter-runner touches first base;

76 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 17. The runner gets two bases on a ball thrown out-of-play. The base he's advancing to, plus one additional base. Also known as, “One + One.” True or False

77 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman When a fielder other than the pitcher throws the ball into dead ball area, the award is 2 bases. If the throw is the first play by an infielder, the award is from the base the runner(s) last legally acquired at the Time of the Pitch. All other awards are from where the runners were at the time the ball left the fielder’s hand (Time of Throw) before going “Out of Play”. False Rule 7.05 (g)

78 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule Each runner including the batter-runner may, without liability to be put out, advance – (g) two bases when with no spectators on the playing field, a thrown ball goes into the stands, or into a bench (whether or not the ball rebounds into the field), or over or under or through a field fence, or on a slanting part of the screen above the backstop, or remains in the meshes of wire screen protecting spectators. The ball is dead. When such wild throw is the first play by an infielder, the umpire, in awarding such bases, shall be governed by the position of the runners at the time the ball was pitched; in all other cases the umpire shall be governed by the position of the runners at the time the wild throw was made

79 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 7.05(g) Continued -- Each runner including the batter-runner may, without liability to be put out, advance - APPROVED RULING: If all runners, including the batter-runner have advanced at least one base when an infielder makes a wild throw on the first play after the pitch, the award shall be governed by the position of the runners when the wild throw was made; The Right Call Casebook -- Comment: Position of the runners when the wild throw is released dictates where they are placed Play #1: Runner on first, batter grounds to the shortstop who bobbles the ball long enough for a runner on first to get to second and batter-runner to get to first at which time he/she throws the ball into a dead ball area. What are the awards?

80 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 7.05(g) Continued -- Each runner including the batter-runner may, without liability to be put out, advance - The Right Call Casebook – Comment Continues: Ruling #1: All (both) runners have advanced at least one base when wild throw was released, award home to runner and third to batter-runner. Play #2: On a ball hit to right field, the runner on first rounds second and the batter rounds first. The right fielder throws behind the runner at first and the ball goes out of play Ruling #2: Runner at second gets home and the batter- runner goes to third. (Time of the throw is the key!)

81 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 18. A coach may touch a runner at anytime, as long as the coach is not considered assisting the runner while advancing or returning to a base. True or False

82 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman The Rule says the runner is out if the coach PHYSICALLY ASSISTS the runner Hand slaps, back pats or simple touches are not physical assists. True Rule 7.09 (h)

83 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule It is interference by a batter or a runner when – (h) in the judgment of the umpire, the base coach at third base, or first base, by touching or holding the runner, physically assists that runner in returning to or leaving third base or first base “The Right Call” Casebook – Play #1: Runner on third, one out, fly ball hit to deep left. Runner on third stays on the bag waiting for the third base coach to signal when the catch is made. The coach slaps the runner on the back when the ball is caught; he/she runs home and scores Ruling: #1 WRONG! Runner declared OUT because the third base coach touching him/her was illegal assistance.

84 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 7.09(h) Continues -- It is interference by a batter or a runner when - Play #2: The batter hits a home run with the bases full. Each runner who passes the third base coach is congratulated with a “high five” by the base coach Ruling #2: No call. This is not assistance Comment: When a play is being made on the assisted runner, the umpire shall call “Time” and enforce the penalty: The runner is out and all runners return to the bases occupied at the time of the interference If no play is being made on the assisted runner, the umpire shall signal that the runner is out and allow plays on other runners if possible (delayed dead ball).

85 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 19. It’s perfectly acceptable for a runner to run the bases in reverse order. True or False

86 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman In order to correct a base running mistake, when doing so, the runner MUST retrace his steps and retouch the bases in reverse order The only time a runner is OUT for running in reverse, is when he is making a “Travesty” of the game or tries to “Confuse” the defense. True Rule 7.08 (i)

87 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule Any runner is out when - (i) after acquiring legal possession of a base, the runner runs the bases in reverse order for the purpose of confusing the defense or making a travesty of the game The umpire shall immediately call "Time" and declare the runner out; INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: This rule limitation does not prevent a runner from returning to a base, such as in a rundown, or a play in which the batter was retired on a fly ball. The batter is not forced to run to first base on a batted ball. He/she may return as far as home plate if he/she desires. If the Batter Runner returns to and touches Home base, the umpire will call him/her out.

88 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 20. The runner must always slide when the play is close. True or False

89 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman There is no “MUST SLIDE" rule. When the fielder has the ball in his possession and waiting to make the tag, the runner has two choices; slide OR “attempt to get around” the fielder. He may NOT deliberately or maliciously contact the fielder, but he is NOT required to slide. If the fielder does not have possession of the ball, but is in the act of fielding a Thrown Ball, Obstruction may very well be called on the defensive fielder. False Rule 7.08 (a) 3

90 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule Any runner is out when - (a)3 the runner does not slide or attempt to get around a fielder who has the ball and is waiting to make the tag The Right Call Casebook -- Comment: There is “NO“ must slide rule. The rule is slide or attempt to get around. The key in this situation is “fielder has the ball and is waiting to make the tag.”

91 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 21. The runner is always safe when hit by a batted ball while touching a base. True or False

92 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman The bases are in fair territory. A runner is OUT when hit by a “Fair Batted Ball” while touching a base, except when hit by an Infield-Fly, or; after the ball has “Passed a Fielder” and no other fielder had a play on the ball. If the runner is touching first or third, he is not out unless the ball touches him over fair territory. If one foot is on the base and the other is in foul ground and he is hit on the foul ground foot, he is NOT out. It is a Foul Ball False Rule 5.09, 7.08 (f)

93 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule Any runner is out when - (f) touched by a fair ball in fair territory before the ball has touched or passed an infielder. The ball is dead and no runner may score, no runners advance, except runners forced to advance; EXCEPTION: If a runner is touching a base when touched by an Infield Fly, that runner is not out, although the batter is out NOTE 1: If a runner is touched by an Infield Fly when not touching a base, both the runner and batter are out NOTE 2: If two runners are touched by the same fair ball, only the first one is out because the ball is instantly dead

94 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 7.08 (f) Continues -- Any runner is out when – The Right Call Casebook – Rule of Thumb: Call the runner out if the ball has not passed or touched an infielder INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: If the base runner is hit by a fair-batted ball while standing on the base, the runner is out, unless the ball has already passed an infielder OR it’s a declared Infield Fly. The base is not a sanctuary.

95 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule The ball becomes dead and runners advance one base, or return to their bases without liability to be put out, when - (f) a fair ball touches a runner or an umpire on fair territory before it touches an infielder including the pitcher, or touches an umpire before it passed an infielder other than the pitcher. Runner hit by fair batted ball is out;

96 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 22. A runner may not Advance on a Foul-Tip. True or False

97 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman There is nothing foul about a Foul-Tip. If the ball hits the bat and goes sharp and direct to the catcher's hand or glove and is leagally caught, is a Foul- Tip by definition. A Foul-Tip is a strike and the ball is alive. It is the same as a swing-and- miss. If the ball is not caught, it is a Foul Ball. False Rule 2.00 Foul Tip

98 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions: -- A FOUL TIP is a batted ball that goes sharp and direct from the bat to the catcher's hands and is legally caught. It is not a foul tip unless caught and any foul tip that is caught is a strike, and the ball is in play. It is not a catch if it is a rebound, unless the ball has first touched the catcher's glove or hand. A foul tip can only be caught by the catcher. “The Right Call” Casebook – Foul tip can only be caught by the catcher. Play 2-5: Pitched ball goes sharply from the bat into the catcher’s mask and is then caught by the catcher. Ruling: Foul ball. To be declared a foul tip, ball must go directly to the catcher’s glove or hand; it may rebound off the mask or chest and still be a foul tip. Dead ball

99 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions: -- A FOUL TIP Continues: -- INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: The ball is alive and in play on a foul tip. Runners may advance as well as being thrown out on a foul tip. A rebound would be in a ball batted sharply to the catcher that does not hit the mitt first, but is finally held by the catcher. This would not be a catch, but simply a foul ball,

100 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 23. It is a “Force Out” when a runner is called out for not tagging up on a fly ball. True or False

101 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman A force play is when a runner is forced to advance because the batter becomes a runner. When the batter is out on a caught fly, all forces are removed. Failure to tag-up, is NOT a force out. Any runs that cross the plate before a legal appeal is made will count. This is an Appeal Play False Rule 2.00 Force Play, 7.08 (d)

102 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions: -- A FORCE PLAY -- is a play in which a runner legally loses the right to occupy a base by reason of the batter becoming a runner. (NOTE: Confusion regarding this play is removed by remembering that frequently the “force” situation is removed during the play Example: Runner on first, one out, ground ball hit sharply to first baseman, who touches the bag and the batter-runner is out. The force is removed at that moment and runner advancing to second must be tagged. If there had been a runner at second or third, and either of these runners scored before the tag-out at second, the run(s) would count. Had the first baseman thrown to second initally and the ball had been returned to first the play at second would have been a force- out, making two outs, and the return throw to first would have made the third out. In that case, no run would score.).

103 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions: -- A FORCE PLAY Continues -- INSTRUCTORS COMMENTS: Another example: Not a force out. One out. Runner on first and third. Batter flies out. Two out. Runner on third tags up and scores. Runner on first tries to retouch before throw from fielder reaches first baseman, but does not get back in time and is out. Three outs. If, in umpire’s judgment, the runner from third touched home before the ball was held at first base, the run counts. A force play exists any time that a runner is forced off of a base due to the batter becoming a runner. Thus, a runner being tagged out running from first to second on a ground ball is a force out

104 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule Any runner is out when - (d) failing to retouch the base after a fair or foul fly is legally caught before that runner or the base is tagged by a fielder. The runner shall not be called out for failure to retouch the base after the first following pitch, or any play or attempted play. This is an appeal play. NOTE:Base runners can legally retouch their base once a fair ball in flight is touched and advance at their own risk and can also advance if a foul ball is caught. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: Runners need not “tag up” on a foul tip. They may steal on a foul tip. If a so-called tip is not caught, it becomes an ordinary foul. Runners then return to their bases.

105 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 24. An appeal on a runner who missed a base can be a force out. True or False

106 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman A runner must touch all the bases. If the runner misses a base to which he was forced because the batter became a runner and is put out before touching that base, the out is still a Force Play / Force Out. If this is the third out, no runs may score. The base can be touched or the runner can be touched, either way it's a “Force Out”. True Rule 2.00 Force Play

107 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions: -- A FORCE PLAY -- is a play in which a runner legally loses the right to occupy a base by reason of the batter becoming a runner. (NOTE: Confusion regarding this play is removed by remembering that frequently the “force” situation is removed during the play I NSTRUCTORS COMMENTS: A force play exists any time that a runner is forced off of a base due to the batter becoming a runner. Thus, a runner being tagged out running from first to second on a ground ball is a force out If the same runner is not put out at 2 nd base, And continues on to 3 rd base, but misses 2 nd base in the process… If a proper Appeal is made at 2 nd base, this OUT would be considered a “Force Out Appeal “

108 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 25. A runner is out if he runs MORE than 3 feet out of the Baseline to avoid a fielder who is fielding a batted ball. True or False

109 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman The runner MUST avoid a fielder attempting to field a BATTED ball. A runner is out for running out of the baseline, only when attempting to AVOID A TAG. False Rule 7.08 (a), 7.09 (j)

110 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule Any runner is out when – (a) (1) running more than three feet away from his/her baseline to avoid being tagged, unless such action is to avoid interference with a fielder fielding a batted ball. A runner’s baseline is established when the tag attempt occurs and is a straight line from the runner to the base which he/she is attempting to reach; or The Right Call Casebook – Comment: When a play is being made on a runner, he/she establishes his/her base line as a straight line between his/her position and the base towards which he/she is moving. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: Be aware that the base runner makes his/her own baseline as he/she progresses (or regresses) around the bases. Depending on the circumstances, his/her baseline frequently may change as the play develops.

111 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule It is interference by a batter or a runner when – (j) the runner fails to avoid a fielder who is attempting to field a batted ball, or intentionally interferes with a thrown ball, provided that if two or more fielders attempt to field a batted ball and the runner comes in contact with one or more of them, the umpire shall determine which fielder is entitled to the benefit of this rule, and shall not declare the runner out for coming in contact with a fielder other than the one the umpire determines to be entitled to field such ball; INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: This further demonstrates that the right of way to the baseline belongs to the fielder on a batted ball and to the base runner on a thrown ball.

112 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 26. Runners may advance when an infield fly is called. True or False

113 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman An Infield-fly is no different than any other fly ball in regard to the runners. The only difference is that the runner is never forced to advance because the batter is out whether the ball is caught or not. True Rule 2.00 Infield Fly 6.05 (d), 7.10 (a)

114 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS: - Continues –- NOTE (1): If a declared Infield Fly is allowed to fall untouched to the ground, and bounces foul before passing first or third base, it is a foul ball. If a declared Infield Fly falls untouched to the ground, outside the baseline, and bounces fair before passing first or third base, it is an Infield Fly. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: Whether the ball is an infield fly or not is solely the judgment of the umpire and may not be protested. However, if the umpires forget to call the Infield Fly because of absent-mindedness the situation must be corrected. The defense must not be allowed to get a double play when the Infield Fly should have been called. Make the belated call and get the situation corrected the way the rule was intended. Generally, the Infield Fly is first called by the plate umpire if the infielder is moving in; in cases where the ball is even with the infielder or the infielder is moving back, the base umpire can initiate the call.

115 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule A batter is out when – (d) an Infield Fly is declared Rule Any runner shall be called out on appeal if – (a) after a fly ball is caught the runner fails to retouch the base before said runner or the base is tagged NOTE: “Retouch” in this rule means to tag up and start from a contact with the base after the ball is caught. A runner is not permitted to take a flying start from a position in back of, and not touching, the base); INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: This is an example when an appeal does not have to be made verbally. When a runner is returning to a base on a caught fly ball, if the ball arrives before the runner does, the umpire will call the runner out.

116 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 27. If the 3 rd OUT is called on a runner for failure to “Retouch” on a “Caught Fly Ball”, NO runs may score True or False

117 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman This is NOT a force play. A force play is when a runner is forced to advance because the batter became a runner. When the batter is out on a caught fly, all forces are removed An out on an a failure to tag-up, is NOT a force out. It is an “Appeal Play” In this situation, it becomes a “Timing Play” and therefore, any runs that cross the plate before the APPEAL is made will count. False Rule 2.00 Force Play, 4.09 (a), 7.10 (a)

118 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS: - Continues –- A FORCE PLAY is a play in which a runner legally loses the right to occupy a base by reason of the batter becoming a runner. (NOTE: Confusion regarding this play is removed by remembering that frequently the “force” situation is removed during the play. Example: Runner on first, one out, ground ball hit sharply to first baseman, who touches the bag and the batter-runner is out. The force is removed at that moment and runner advancing to second must be tagged. If there had been a runner at second or third, and either of these runners scored before the tag-out at second, the run(s) would count. Had the first baseman thrown to second and the ball had been returned to first the play at second would have been a force-out, making two outs, and the return throw to first would have made the third out (a Put Out). In that case, no run would score.)

119 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS – Force Play - Continues –- INSTRUCTORS COMMENTS: Another example is: Not a force out. Play:One out. Runner on first and third. Batter flies out for out #2. Runner on third tags up and scores. Runner on first tries to retouch before throw from fielder reaches first baseman, but does not get back in time and is called for out #3. Three outs. Ruling:If, in umpire’s judgment, the runner from third touched home before the ball was held at first base, the run counts.

120 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule HOW A TEAM SCORES (a) One run shall be scored each time a runner legally advances to and touches first, second, third and home base before three players are put out to end the inning. EXCEPTION: A run is not scored if the runner advances to home base during a play in which the third out is made (1) by the batter-runner before touching first base (2) by any runner being forced out; or (3) by a preceding runner who is declared out because that runner failed to touch one of the bases (appeal play) APPROVED RULING: One out, Jones on third, Smith on first and Brown flies out to right field for the second out. Jones tags up and scores after the catch. Smith attempted to return to first but the right fielder’s throw beat “Smith” to the base for the third out. But Jones scored before the throw to catch Smith reached first base. Hence, Jones’ run counts. It was not a force play.

121 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule HOW A TEAM SCORES (Continued) “The Right Call” Casebook – Play: One out...runners on first and second. Batter smashes a double to left field. Runner from second scores but runner from first is thrown out at the plate. The batter advances to second safely BUT is declared out on appeal for missing first base. Does the run score? Ruling: No! The runner crossed the plate on a play in which the batter-runner made the third out before he/she touched first base. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: Numerous situations can develop that will nullify runs. The umpire should remember the basic elements of this rule and particularly the three exceptions. Generally, any run that scores during a play in which the third out is made by one of the three exceptions will not count.

122 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule Any runner shall be called out on appeal if – (a) after a fly ball is caught the runner fails to retouch the base before said runner or the base is tagged; (NOTE: “Retouch” in this rule means to tag up and start from a contact with the base after the ball is caught. A runner is not permitted to take a flying start from a position in back of, and not touching, the base); INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: This is an example when an appeal does not have to be made verbally. When a runner is returning to a base on a caught fly ball, if the ball arrives before the runner does, the umpire will call the runner out.

123 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 28. A pitch that bounces during the delivery, may be hit the same as any pitch delivered “In-Flight” by the pitcher True or False

124 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman A pitch is a ball delivered to the batter by the pitcher. It doesn't matter how it gets to the batter, either “In Flight” or by a “Bounce”. True Rule 2.00 Pitch, 6.09 (a)

125 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS: –- A PITCH is a ball delivered to the batter by the pitcher BASEBALL Exception: For the purpose of maintaining a pitch count, a balk or illegal pitch shall count as one pitch; even if a pitch is not actually thrown. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: All other deliveries of the ball by one player to another are thrown balls. Rule The batter becomes a runner when - (a) a fair ball is hit;

126 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 29. A batter that is HIT by a Pitch that Bounces during delivery is entitled to be awarded 1 st base True or False

127 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman If the batter is hit by a pitch, regardless of if it ‘Bounces” or is “In Flight”, and IF the batter is attempting to avoid the pitch, he is awarded first base. True Rule 2.00 Pitch, 6.08 (b)

128 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS: –- A PITCH is a ball delivered to the batter by the pitcher BASEBALL Exception: For the purpose of maintaining a pitch count, a balk or illegal pitch shall count as one pitch; even if a pitch is not actually thrown. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: All other deliveries of the ball by one player to another are thrown balls.

129 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule The batter becomes a runner and is entitled to first base without liability to be put out (provided said runner advances to and touches first base) when - (b) the batter is touched by a pitched ball which the batter is not attempting to hit unless (1) The ball is in the strike zone when it touches the batter, or (2) The batter makes no attempt to avoid being touched by the ball; NOTE: If the ball is in the strike zone when it touches the batter, it shall be called a strike, whether or not the batter tries to avoid the ball. If the ball is outside the strike zone when it touches the batter, it shall be called a ball if that batter makes no attempt to avoid being touched.

130 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule The batter becomes a runner… (Continues) -- APPROVED RULING: When the batter is touched by a pitched ball which does not entitle that batter to first base, the ball is dead and no runner may advance The Right Call Casebook Comment: Do not get talked into buying the old “The hands are part of the bat” myth. No one has manufactured a bat with hands, yet!

131 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 30. If a fielder holds a fly ball securely in the hand or glove, and demonstrates control… It is considered a CATCH True or False

132 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman A catch is legal when the umpire judges that the fielder has SECURE POSSESION and COMPLETE CONTROL of the ball. In addition… The release of the ball must be… VOLUNTARY AND INTENTIONAL False Rule 2.00 Catch

133 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS: –- A CATCH is the act of a fielder in getting secure possession in the hand or glove of a ball in flight and firmly holding it before it touches the ground providing such fielder does not use cap, protector, pocket or any other part of the uniform in getting possession. It is not a catch, however, if simultaneously or immediately following contact with the ball the fielder collides with a player or with a wall, or if that fielder falls down, and as a result of such collision or falling, drops the ball. It is not a catch if a fielder touches a fly ball which then hits a member of the offensive team or an umpire and then is caught by another defensive player. If the fielder has made the catch and drops the ball while in the act of making a throw following the catch, the ball shall be adjudged to have been caught.

134 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS: CATCH Continued – In establishing the validity of the catch, the fielder shall hold the ball long enough to prove complete control of the ball and that release of the ball is voluntary and intentional. A catch is legal if the ball is finally held by any fielder, even though juggled, or held by another fielder before it touches the ground. Runners may leave their bases the instant the first fielder touches the ball. “The Right Call” Casebook – Play #1: A legal catch occurs when a fielder holds the ball: (a) in his/her hands Ruling: YES (b) under his/her arm Ruling: NO (c) in his/her cap Ruling: NO (d) in his/her glove Ruling: YES Additional conditions may also be required

135 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS: CATCH Continued – “The Right Call” Casebook – Play #2: Batter hits a fly to center field. The center fielder gets the ball in his/her hand(s) but drops it: (a) when he/she falls to the ground and rolls over (b) when he/she collides with a fielder or a wall (c) when he/she starts to throw to the infield. Ruling #2: (a) it is not a catch (b) it is not a catch. (c) it is a legal catch if the ball was held long enough for the center fielder to regain his/her balance but is then dropped in a motion associated with an intended throw or release. Thus providing the fielder has complete control of the ball and that release of the ball is voluntary and intentional.

136 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS: CATCH Continued – INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: When the rule states that the player may not use “any part of the uniform” in gaining possession, it means to gain possession by utilizing a part of the uniform. Trapping the fly ball against the uniform or chest protector is okay if the player gains and maintains possession in the hand or glove or both. It DOES mean you CAN NOT use a Cap or Catcher’s Mask to gain possession or control Runners may advance the instant the fly ball is touched by a defensive player. For safety and the fact that it is a “Dead Ball Area”, a fielder may not enter the dugout to make a catch

137 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 31.On a Force Out or Appeal, you may tag the base with your foot, instead of tagging the runner True or False

138 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman When making a “Force” or Appeal” play, you may tag the base instead of the runner. When doing so, you may use ANY part of the body, including the empty hand or piece of uniform in it’s normal location on the body. However, if you tag the runner you MUST tag Him / Her with the Ball while holding the Ball in the Hand or Glove True Rule 2.00 Force Play, Person, Tag, Touch

139 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS: –- A FORCE PLAYis a play in which a runner legally loses the right to occupy a base by reason of the batter becoming a runner. The PERSONof a player or an umpire is any part of the body, clothing or equipment. A TAGis the action of a fielder in touching a base with the body while holding the ball securely and firmly in the hand or glove; or touching a runner with the ball or with the hand or glove holding the ball, while holding the ball securely and firmly in the hand or glove. To TOUCHa player or an umpire is to touch any part of the player or umpire's body, clothing or equipment.

140 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS: (Continued) –- INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: Tagging or touching a player could include long hair on the player or a jacket “flapping in the breeze.”

141 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 32. In Senior Division, when a Pitcher commits a BALK, the ball is always DEAD immediately. True or False

142 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman If a throw or pitch is made after the balk call, the ball is “Delayed Dead”. At the end of the play the balk may be enforced, or not, depending on what happened. On a throw; if ALL runners advance on the play, the balk is ignored. If not, time would be called and all runners would be awarded one base. On a pitch; if ALL runners INCLUDING the batter, advance on the play, the balk is ignored. Otherwise, it is no-pitch and the balk award is made from the time of the pitch. False Rule 2.00 Balk, Pitch, Throw, 7.05 (g)

143 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS: –- A BALK is an illegal act by the pitcher with a runner or runners on base, entitling all runners to advance one base. A PITCH is a ball delivered to the batter by the pitcher. A THROW is the act of propelling the ball with the hand and arm to a given objective and is to be always distinguished from the pitch. Note:The time the Pitch or Throw is RELEASED determines the “Time of Pitch” or “Time of Throw” Rule 7.05(g): two bases…. “The Right Call” Casebook – Comment: Position of the runners when the wild throw is released dictates where they are placed.

144 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 33. If the player's feet are in fair territory when the ball is touched, it is a fair ball. True or False

145 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman The position of the player's feet or any other part of the body does not matter A ball is judged fair or foul based on the relationship between the ball and the Fair/Foul Line, at the time the ball is touched by the fielder. False Rule 2.00 Fair Ball

146 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS: –- A FAIR BALL is a batted ball that settles on fair ground between home and first base, or between home and third base, or that is on or over fair territory when bounding to the outfield past first or third base, or that touches first, second or third base, or that first falls on fair territory on or beyond first base or third base, or that while on or over fair territory is touched by the person of an umpire or player, or that, while over fair territory, passes out of the playing field in flight. NOTE:A fair fly shall be adjudged according to the relative position of the ball and the foul line, including the foul pole, and not as to whether the fielder is on fair or foul territory at the time such fielder touches the ball.

147 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 34. The ball does not need to be returned to the pitcher before an appeal can be made. True or False

148 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman An appeal may be made anytime the ball is alive. The only time the ball must go to the pitcher, is when time is out. The ball cannot be made live until the pitcher has the ball while on the rubber and the umpire says "Play” If time is not out, the appeal can be made immediately, by any player. True Rule 2.00 Appeal, 5.11, 7.10

149 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS: –- An APPEAL is an act of a [any] fielder in claiming a violation of the rules by the offensive team After the ball is dead, play shall be resumed when the pitcher takes position on the pitcher's plate with a new ball, or the same ball in said pitcher’s possession and the plate umpire calls "Play." The plate umpire shall call "Play" as soon as the pitcher takes position on the plate with possession of the ball Any runner shall be called out on appeal if – INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: A player, inadvertently stepping on the base with a ball in his/her hand, would not constitute an appeal. Time is not out when an appeal is being made.

150 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 35. In MAJOR baseball. with runners on base, it is an Illegal Pitch and a Ball to the batter, if the pitcher does not come to a complete stop True or False

151 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman A pitch is a ball delivered to the batter by the pitcher. With NO runners on base, if the ball is not delivered, it is not a pitch. Therefore it cannot be a called Ball or Strike With runners on base it is an Illegal Pitch if the Pitcher stops completely and does not re-start. A Ball is awarded to the batter. It also counts as a pitch towards the pitchers pitch count However, in Majors, some leeway is given for a “Momentary” stop in the delivery motion. False Rule 2.00 Pitch, Illegal Pitch, 8.05 A)

152 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule DEFINITIONS: –- A PITCH is a ball delivered to the batter by the pitcher. An ILLEGAL PITCH is (1) a pitch delivered to the batter when the pitcher does not have the pivot foot in contact with the pitcher's plate; (2) a quick return pitch, or (3) any other act meeting the criteria established in Rule Rule 8.05 (MINOR/MAJOR BASEBALL) – An illegal pitch is when – (a) the pitcher, while touching the plate, makes any motion naturally associated with the pitch and fails to make such delivery;

153 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 8.05 (MINOR/MAJOR BASEBALL) – An illegal pitch is when (Continued)– The Right Call” Casebook -- Comment: Umpires should bear in mind that the purpose of the balk (illegal pitch) rule is to prevent the pitcher from deliberately deceiving the base runner. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: If the pitcher (with runners on base) starts his/her delivery, in any way, and stops, (in Major Division… does not re-start and complete the delivery), the pitcher has violated the rule. Call a [balk - Sr. Div] illegal pitch.

154 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 36. The pitcher must come to a set position before a pick-off throw to any base True or False

155 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman The pitcher is required to come to a complete stop in the Set position before delivering the pitch, not before making a throw. False Rule 2.00, Throw, Pitch, Set Position, 8.05 (m)

156 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions: –- A THROW is the act of propelling the ball with the hand and arm to a given objective and is to be always distinguished from the pitch. A PITCH is a ball delivered to the batter by the pitcher. SET POSITION is one of the two legal pitching positions. Rule 8.05 (MINOR/MAJOR BASEBALL) – An illegal pitch is when – (m) the pitcher delivers the pitch from Set Position without coming to a stop. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: In Majors and below, it is not necessary to stop prior to delivery. Pitchers can also windup from Set Position. In Juniors, Seniors and Big League, the pitcher may step and throw to a base at any time during the stretch. However, the pitcher must come to a stop before delivering the ball [pitch] to the batter.

157 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 37. The pitcher, in the SET position, must step off the rubber before a pick-off throw to 1 st base True or False

158 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman If the pitcher steps off the rubber he is no longer the pitcher, he is a fielder. In the SET (or the Windup) position, the pitcher can throw to a base from the rubber, provided he does not violate any of the rules under Rule 8.05 False Rule 8.01 (b)

159 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 8.01 Legal pitching delivery -- There are two legal pitching positions, the Windup Position and the Set Position, and either position may be used at any time. (b) The Set Position. Set Position shall be indicated by the pitcher when that pitcher stands facing the batter with the pivot foot in contact with, and the other foot in front of the pitcher’s plate, holding the ball in both hands in front of the body and coming to a complete stop. From such set position the pitcher may; 1) deliver the ball to the batter, 2) throw to a base or 3) step backward off (disengage) the pitcher's plate with the pivot foot. Before assuming the Set Position, the pitcher may elect to make any natural preliminary motion such as that known as “the stretch." But if the pitcher so elects, that pitcher shall come to the Set Position before delivering the ball to that batter.

160 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 38. It is NOT a homerun if a fielder catches a fly ball and then falls over the fence. True or False

161 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman As long as the fielder is not touching the ground in dead ball territory, if he holds onto the ball and meets the definition of a catch when he catches the ball, it is a legal catch. If the catch is not the third out and the fielder falls down in dead ball territory after catching the ball, the Batter would be OUT, but all other runners are awarded one base. True Rule 2.00 Catch, 5.10 (f), 6.05 (a), 7.04 (b)

162 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 2.00 Definitions: -- A CATCH (in part) is the act of a fielder in getting secure possession in the hand or glove of a ball in flight and firmly holding it before it touches the ground. The fielder shall hold the ball long enough to prove complete control of the ball and that release of the ball is voluntary and intentional. Rule The ball becomes dead when an umpire calls "Time." The umpire-in-chief shall call "Time" (f) when a fielder, after catching a fly ball, falls into a stand, or falls across ropes into a crowd when spectators are on the field, or other dead-ball area. Rule A batter is out when - (a) a fair or foul fly ball (other than a foul tip) is legally caught by a fielder;

163 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule Each runner, other than the batter, may without liability to be put out, advance one base when - (b) a fielder, after catching a fly ball, falls into a stand, or falls across ropes into a crowd when spectators are on the field, or falls into other dead-ball areas; INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS (in part): If a fielder, after having made a legal catch, should fall into a stand or any other out-of-play area while in possession of the ball, the ball is dead and each runner shall advance one base, without liability to be put out

164 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 39. The pitcher, in the WIND-UP position, must Step off the rubber before a pick-off throw to 1 st base True or False

165 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman If the pitcher steps off the rubber he is no longer the pitcher, he is a fielder. In the WIND-UP position, he can throw to a base from the rubber, provided he does not violate any part of Rule 8.05 False Rule 8.01 (a)

166 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 8.01 Legal pitching delivery -- There are two legal pitching positions, the Windup Position and the Set Position, and either position may be used at any time. (a) The Windup Position. The pitcher shall stand facing the batter, the pivot foot in contact with the pitcher's plate, and the other foot free. From this position any natural movement associated with the delivery of the ball to the batter commits the pitcher to pitch without interruption or alteration. From this position the pitcher may: (1) deliver the ball to the batter, or (2) step and throw to a base in an attempt to pick off a runner, or (3) disengage the pitcher’s plate. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: It is legal to step and throw to a base from the windup position. However, once the pitcher begins the pitching motion, he/she is committed to the pitch and may not throw to a base.

167 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman 40. The home plate Umpire is normally the “Chief Umpire” for the game, however he/she CAN NOT overrule the other umps at anytime. True or False

168 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman No umpire may overrule another umpire's call. The umpire who made a call or ruling may ask for help from the other Umpires if he/she wishes. However, if help is requested, the Umpire making the original call must either make the change or stay with the original decision True Rule 9.02 (b), 9.02 (c) 9.04 (c) exception

169 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule (b) If there is reasonable doubt that any umpire's decision may be in conflict with the rules, the manager may appeal the decision and ask that a correct ruling be made. Such an appeal shall be made only to the umpire who made the protested decision. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: This, of course, does NOT apply to judgment calls, just rules decisions. Rule (c) If a decision is appealed, the umpire making the decision may ask another umpire for information before making a final decision. No umpire shall criticize, seek to reverse or interfere with another umpire’s decision unless asked to do so by the umpire making it.

170 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 9.02c (Continued) -- INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: Keep in mind that the umpire who has made the rules decision is the only one who may initiate the discussion. Regardless of the experience or knowledge, no other umpire may force the discussion or overrule the decision. If a manager has a concern with a rules decision, he/she must take his/her case to the umpire who made the decision. Checking with another umpire is not required. No umpire can overrule another umpire [Exception: Rule 9.04(c)]

171 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman Rule 9.04 [Exception]: (c) If different decisions should be made on one play by different umpires, the umpire-in-chief shall call all the umpires into consultation, with no manager or player present. After consultation, the Umpire-In-Chief shall determine which decision shall prevail, based on which umpire was in the best position and which decision was most likely correct. Play shall proceed as if only the final decision had been made. INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS: This is the ONLY occasion where one umpire has authority to “overrule” another umpire. Umpires should, however, work to understand proper mechanics and communication that will keep this situation from arising.

172 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman

173 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman

174 A Power Point Presentation by Lee Batterman


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