Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Pitch vs. Velocity By: Brendan Aumiller. Does the type of baseball pitch affect the velocity of a baseball?

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Pitch vs. Velocity By: Brendan Aumiller. Does the type of baseball pitch affect the velocity of a baseball?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Pitch vs. Velocity By: Brendan Aumiller

2 Does the type of baseball pitch affect the velocity of a baseball?

3 Hypothesis My hypothesis is that the type of baseball pitch will affect the velocity of a baseball because of: The different grip can affect the velocity. The arm motion will affect the velocity. The air resistance under the baseball will affect the velocity. Some pitches are thrown with a greater force directly behind the ball. Some pitches are thrown with more spin on the ball, which means less force directly behind the ball. Velocity = distance / time.

4 Materials Two Gloves Two People Baseball Radar Gun

5 Procedure Go to the “Dopson Pitching Academy”. Measure the distance from a major league pitching mound to home plate (60ft. 6in.). Have Andy Rozylowicz (Eighth grader at St. Mary’s) throw different baseball pitches. Compare each speed by creating a graph.

6 Data Fastball: Average Speed kilometers per hour (69.2mph). Change-Up: Average Speed kilometers per hour (60.6mph). Cutter: Average Speed kilometers per hour (65.6mph). Slider: Average Speed kilometers per hour (56.6mph). Curve: Average Speed kilometers per hour (55.6mph). Knuckle: Average Speed kilometers per hour (44.4mph).

7 Research Have you ever wondered why different baseball pitches all have different speeds? Well I have, and that is why I researched this question. I found many interesting facts and truths while I was researching. I found out that the curveball had significantly more of a sidearm twist in the forearm (32 degrees) than the fastball (17 degrees) or change-up (18 degrees). Another fact I found was that the two most different pitches in baseball are the fastball and the curveball. Another difference was while pitching, the lead knee extended 9 degrees in the fastball and 5 degrees in the curveball, flexing 4 degrees during the change-up. After the pitch, the pitchers land with their lead foot 4 cm more closed (towards the third base side of the mound for a right-handed pitcher) when throwing curveballs compared to fastballs. The fastball had significantly higher values than the curveball for elbow torque. One similarity between the fastball and curveball is they have similar elbow extension, but slower in the curveball. While pitching the fastball, you should grip the baseball loose so it comes out of the hand easily. A loose grip minimizes friction between the ball and your hand, causing a greater amount of velocity. Three factors affecting a fastball are velocity, gravity, and backspin. The fastball is the best and easiest pitch to throw in baseball. The curveball is very different from the fastball. It spins from top to bottom, which means that it curves from the top of the baseball. The only way you can spin the baseball from top to bottom is by flicking your wrist and gripping the ball with two fingers together. This proves that the curveball is the opposite of a fastball. The slider is very similar to the curveball. The only difference is that the slider has more velocity. It is gripped along the seams which causes movement, but it is help slightly off to the center of the baseball. While throwing it, the sliders arm speed should stay the same as the fastballs arm speed. The slider is the third fastest pitch in all of baseball. The change-up is very similar to the fastball, but it is gripped more in the palm of your hand. This causes the pitch to slow down and “drop” as the pitch is thrown. The best thing about a change-up is that it does not put any pressure on your arm, so no injuries occur. The knuckleball is thrown very similar to the curveball. The only difference is that when you throw it, your fingernails must be dug in to the seams of the ball. This causes minimum rotation and maximum movement. At all levels of competition, a good fastball is the foundation for successful pitching. The change-up seems to be a good choice for a second pitch as it produces a lesser chance of injury. At all levels of competition, a good fastball is the foundation for successful pitching. The change-up seems to be a good choice for a second pitch as it produces a lesser chance of injury.

8 Graph

9 Conclusion The type of baseball pitch does affect the velocity of a baseball. There are three main factors to this statement; the type of grip on the ball, the ball rotation, and the amount of force put directly behind the ball. This is why my proven theory is correct.


Download ppt "Pitch vs. Velocity By: Brendan Aumiller. Does the type of baseball pitch affect the velocity of a baseball?"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google