Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Welcome to Interactive Chalkboard Mathematics: Applications and Concepts, Course 1 Interactive Chalkboard Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Welcome to Interactive Chalkboard Mathematics: Applications and Concepts, Course 1 Interactive Chalkboard Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Welcome to Interactive Chalkboard Mathematics: Applications and Concepts, Course 1 Interactive Chalkboard Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Developed by FSCreations, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio Send all inquiries to: GLENCOE DIVISION Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 8787 Orion Place Columbus, Ohio 43240

3 Splash Screen

4 Contents Lesson 3-1Representing Decimals Lesson 3-2Comparing and Ordering Decimals Lesson 3-3Rounding Decimals Lesson 3-4Estimating Sums and Differences Lesson 3-5Adding and Subtracting Decimals

5 Lesson 1 Contents Example 1Write a Decimal in Word Form Example 2Standard Form and Expanded Form

6 Example 1-1a Write in word form. Answer: is one hundred two and fifty-six thousandths.

7 Example 1-1b Write in word form. Answer: two hundred thirty and one hundred eight thousandths

8 Example 1-2a Write seventy-six and one hundred three thousandths in standard form and in expanded form. Answer: Standard form: Expanded form:

9 Example 1-2b Write fifty-nine and sixty-two thousandths in standard form and in expanded form. Expanded form: (5  10) (9  1) (0  0.1) (6  0.01) (2  0.001) Standard form: Answer:

10 End of Lesson 1

11 Lesson 2 Contents Example 1Compare Decimals Example 2Order Decimals

12 Example 2-1a BASEBALL The table below lists the final winning percents for several American League baseball teams in Use > or < to compare New York’s percent with Cleveland’s percent. Source: Final Standings TeamPercent Standings New York0.594 Boston0.509 Cleveland0.562 Detroit0.407

13 Example 2-1b Method 1 Use place value. Since 9 > 6, > First, line up the decimal points. Then, starting at the left, find the first place the digits differ. Compare the digits. New York: Cleveland:

14 Example 2-1c Method 2 Use a number line. Numbers to the right are greater than numbers to the left. Since is to the right of 0.562, > Answer: > 0.562; New York had the higher winning percentage.

15 Example 2-1d EXAMS In Mr. Smith’s math class, 29.65% of the students earned a grade of “A” at the end of the semester. In Mrs. Dempsey’s class, 29.85% of the students earned a grade of “A” at the end of the semester. Use > or < to compare the percent in Mr. Smith’s class with the percent in Mrs. Dempsey’s class. Answer: 29.65% < 29.85%

16 Example 2-2a Order 25, 25.1, 24.36, and from least to greatest. Answer: The order from least to greatest is 24.36, 25, 25.03, and First, line up the decimal points. Next, annex zeros so that each has the same number of decimal places. Finally, use place value to compare the decimals.     25.03

17 Example 2-2b Order 71, 71.04, 70.89, and 71.4 from least to greatest. Answer: 70.89, 71, 71.04, 71.4

18 End of Lesson 2

19 Lesson 3 Contents Example 1Round Decimals Example 2Round Decimals Example 3Use Rounding to Solve a Problem

20 Example 3-1a Round to the nearest whole number. Answer: To the nearest whole number, rounds to 8.0. On the number line, 7.6 is closer to 8.0 than Then look at the digit to the right. Since 6 is greater than 5, add one to the underlined digit. Underline the digit to be rounded. In this case, the ones place.

21 Example 3-1b Round to the nearest whole number. Answer: 4

22 Example 3-2a Round to the nearest tenth. Answer: To the nearest tenth, rounds to 68.9 On the number line, is closer to 68.9 than Then look at the digit to the right. Since the digit is 4, the digit 9 stays the same. Underline the digit to be rounded. In this case, the digit is in the tenths place.

23 Example 3-2b Round to the nearest tenth. Answer: 125.4

24 Example 3-3a EARNINGS In the year 2000, the average hourly wage for a U.S. production worker was $ How much is this to the nearest dollar? The average weekly earnings were $ What is this to the nearest dollar? Answer: To the nearest dollar, the average hourly wage was $ To round to the nearest dollar, round to the nearest ones. $13.75 Underline the digit in the ones place. Then look at the digit to the right. The digit is greater than 5. So, add one to the underlined digit.

25 Example 3-3b Answer: To the nearest dollar, the average weekly earnings were $ Round $ to the nearest ones. $  $ Since 3 is less than 5, the digit in the ones place remains the same.

26 Example 3-3c CEREAL The price per ounce for a box of cereal is shown as $ on the tag in the grocery store. How much is this to the nearest cent? Answer: $0.13

27 End of Lesson 3

28 Lesson 4 Contents Example 1Use Estimation to Solve Problems Example 2Use Estimation to Solve Problems Example 3Use Front-End Estimation Example 4Use Clustering

29 Example 4-1a POPULATION The table below shows the population of the American colonies in Estimate the total population of North Carolina and South Carolina Population (thousands) Colony Population (thousands) Colony Connecticut New York Delaware New Hampshire 62.4 Georgia 23.4 Massachusetts Maryland New Jersey Virginia North Carolina South Carolina Rhode Island Pennsylvania

30 Example 4-1b Answer: There were about 300 thousand people in North Carolina and South Carolina. Round each number to the nearest hundred for easier adding  rounds to  rounds to 100.

31 Example 4-1c POPULATION The table below shows the population of the American colonies in Estimate how many more people were in Massachusetts than in Connecticut. Answer: about 60 thousand more people Population (thousands) Colony Population (thousands) Colony Connecticut New York Delaware New Hampshire 62.4 Georgia 23.4 Massachusetts Maryland New Jersey Virginia North Carolina South Carolina Rhode Island Pennsylvania

32 Example 4-2a POPULATION The table below shows the population of the American colonies in Estimate how many more people lived in Rhode Island than in Georgia in Population (thousands) Colony Population (thousands) Colony Connecticut New York Delaware New Hampshire 62.4 Georgia 23.4 Massachusetts Maryland New Jersey Virginia North Carolina South Carolina Rhode Island Pennsylvania

33 Example 4-2b Answer: There were about 40 thousand more people. Round each number to the nearest ten for easier subtracting  rounds to 60. – 23.4  – rounds to

34 Example 4-2c POPULATION The table below shows the population of the American colonies in Estimate the total number of people in Pennsylvania and New Jersey in Answer: about 300 thousand people Population (thousands) Colony Population (thousands) Colony Connecticut New York Delaware New Hampshire 62.4 Georgia 23.4 Massachusetts Maryland New Jersey Virginia North Carolina South Carolina Rhode Island Pennsylvania

35 Example 4-3a Estimate using front-end estimation. Answer: Using front-end estimation, is about 69. Add the front digits. Then add the next digits. 6 

36 Example 4-3b Answer: 97 Estimate using front-end estimation.

37 Example 4-4a MULTIPLE-CHOICE TEST ITEM A cage of guinea pigs at the pet store is given a vitamin-water solution each day. Last week the guinea pigs consumed 21.8 ounces, 19.1 ounces, 20.3 ounces, 18.9 ounces, and 22.0 ounces of the solution each day. Use this information to estimate the total amount of vitamin solution consumed in one day. A 70 ozB 90 ozC 100 ozD 120 oz

38 Example 4-4b Read the Test Item The addends are all clustered around 20. Answer: C 17.8→ → → → → Solve the Test Item Multiplication is repeated addition. So, a good estimate is 5  20, or 100.

39 Example 4-4c MULTIPLE-CHOICE TEST ITEM During the month of February, Jonathon spends $14.78 on gasoline the first week, $15.35 on gasoline during the second week, $15.94 on gasoline during the third week, and $14.07 on gasoline during the fourth week. Use this information to estimate the total amount Jonathon spent on gasoline during February. Answer: C A $35B $50C $60D $100

40 End of Lesson 4

41 Lesson 5 Contents Example 1Add Decimals Example 2Subtract Decimals Example 3Annex Zeros Example 4Use Decimals to Solve a Problem Example 5Evaluate an Expression

42 Example 5-1a Find the sum of 75.6 and Answer: The sum of 75.6 and 21.3 is Compare the answer to the estimate. Since 96.9 is close to 97, the answer is reasonable. Estimate 96.9 Add as with whole numbers. Line up the decimal points

43 Example 5-1b Find the sum of 34.6 and Answer: 87.8

44 Example 5-2a Find – Estimate Answer: Compare to the estimate. Line up the decimal points Subtract as with whole numbers. –

45 Example 5-2b Find – Answer: 6.443

46 Example 5-3a Find 8 – Estimate Answer: Compare to the estimate. Annex zeros –

47 Example 5-3b Find 9 – Answer: 5.72

48 Example 5-4a PIZZA Joe’s Pizza Shop sells an average of 89.7 pizzas on Tuesday nights and an average of pizzas on Saturday nights. How many more pizzas does Joe’s Pizza Shop sell on Saturdays? Answer: Joe’s Pizza Shop sells an average of more pizzas on Saturdays. Estimate –

49 Example 5-4b MOVIES The local movie theater sells an average of 65.8 tickets on Thursdays and an average of tickets on Saturdays. How many more tickets are sold on Saturdays? Answer: tickets

50 Example 5-5a Answer: The value is This value is close to the estimate. So, the answer is reasonable. ALGEBRA Replace a with and b with 4.8. Estimate – 4.80 Line up the decimal points. Annex a zero Subtract as with whole numbers.

51 Example 5-5b Answer: ALGEBRA

52 End of Lesson 5

53 Online Explore online information about the information introduced in this chapter. Click on the Connect button to launch your browser and go to the Mathematics: Applications and Concepts, Course 1 Web site. At this site, you will find extra examples for each lesson in the Student Edition of your textbook. When you finish exploring, exit the browser program to return to this presentation. If you experience difficulty connecting to the Web site, manually launch your Web browser and go to

54 Transparency 1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

55 Transparency 1a

56 Transparency 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

57 Transparency 2a

58 Transparency 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

59 Transparency 3a

60 Transparency 4 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

61 Transparency 4a

62 Transparency 5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

63 Transparency 5a

64 End of Custom Show End of Custom Shows WARNING! Do Not Remove This slide is intentionally blank and is set to auto-advance to end custom shows and return to the main presentation.

65 End of Slide Show


Download ppt "Welcome to Interactive Chalkboard Mathematics: Applications and Concepts, Course 1 Interactive Chalkboard Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google