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Alternative Partners and Non-Traditional Partnerships in Teacher Education: The Successes, Challenges, and Pitfalls of Crafting Partnerships and Cultivating.

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Presentation on theme: "Alternative Partners and Non-Traditional Partnerships in Teacher Education: The Successes, Challenges, and Pitfalls of Crafting Partnerships and Cultivating."— Presentation transcript:

1 Alternative Partners and Non-Traditional Partnerships in Teacher Education: The Successes, Challenges, and Pitfalls of Crafting Partnerships and Cultivating Partners 2014 Gulf South Summit “Creating Capacity Collaboratively: Connecting Learning and Civic Outcomes” Thursday March 27, :15 Meeting Room A Margaret-Mary Sulentic Dowell Louisiana State University Estanislado S. Barrera, IVJennifer L. Jolly Louisiana State University Louisiana State University Leah Katherine SaalTynisha D. Meidl Arkansas State University St. Norbert College

2 Alternative Partners And Non-traditional Partnerships Margaret-Mary veteran service-learning scholar charter school Stan novice to emerging service-learning scholar public library Jennifer veteran service-learning scholar state museum Leah novice service-learning scholar International school in Chile Ty veteran service-learning scholar urban charter school

3 The three overarching goals of workshop: 1)explore the successes of alternative partners and non-traditional partnerships that connect learning and civic outcomes, 2)examine the challenges of alternative partners and non-traditional partnerships that connect learning and civic outcomes, and 3)illustrate how long-term partnerships that connect learning and civic outcomes can devolve.

4 Five cases of service-learning: Alternative partners and non- traditional partnerships In each case, researcher refigured course to enhance civic learning outcomes and strengthen campus- school-community partnerships.

5 Successful community partnerships Case 1: The Carver Cubs Book Club Estanislado S. Barrera, IV Case 2: Pride of Place: Stories in Service-Learning Jennifer L. Jolly Challenges of developing long distance partnerships Case 3: Service-Learning Abroad Leah Katherine Saal Case 4: From the Mid-West to the South: Tynisha D. Meidl Pitfalls of maintaining a long term partnership Case 5: Crafting Field Experiences in an Urban Charter School Margaret-Mary Sulentic Dowell

6 CASE 1: CARVER CUBS BOOK CLUB ESTANISLADO S. BARRERA, IV ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF READING & LITERACY STUDIES LSU School of Education

7 Creating the Carver Cubs Book Club A “commitment [that has] taken the form of doing strategic planning together [and] intentionally developing interdependent agendas” (Marton, 1995, p. 30). The Partnership – CCELL – Baton Rouge Parish Public Library System – Carver Library & patrons – Barrera & graduate level course for Reading Specialists Morton, K. (1995). The irony of service: Charity, project, and social change in service-learning. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 2,

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10 Transmitting through Pedagogical Strategies Transforming through Community Partnerships Extending through Reflection Strategies “A partnership [is a] relationship that calls for significant investment of time and effort on both sides, relationships designed to continue far beyond achieving specific tasks” (Zlotkowski, 1999, p. 73). The benefits: Zlotkowski, E. (1999). Pedagogy and engagement. In R. Bingle (Ed.), Colleges and universities as citizens (pp ). Boston: MA: Allyn & Bacon.

11 Case 2: Pride of Place: Stories in Service-Learning Jennifer L. Jolly Associate Professor, Gifted Education Louisiana State University

12 Pride of Place: Stories in Service-Learning Louisianan State Museum

13 Education Pre-service Teachers & Louisiana State Museum Students developed social studies units that incorporated an aspect of the museum. The museum opened several months after Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and took several years to build up an educational staff, leaving educator resources lacking. Several museum staff approached the course instructor in 2006 about developing units of study with my class for the museum, particularly their exhibit on Old South Baton Rouge (and corresponding book).

14 Reflection: Social Studies Outcomes Several students indicated a new or renewed interest in social studies as evidenced, “If I was a young student and was given the chance to take a field trip to this museum, I honestly believe that my judgment and perception of social studies would have been more positive.” “Although I know our actions in class are not enough to change the curriculum throughout all the schools in the nation, I do hope it will help start a chain reaction that will lead to greater interest and emphasis being placed on the subject.” “... the museum inspired me to consider what more that I may not know about social studies. I felt encouraged to explore other areas of social studies and eventually I will share what I learn with my students.”

15 Reflection: Engagement Many students remarked about the importance of the museum to the local community and beyond, “... because it [the museum] it shows their heritage and makes the people feel important and it shows them that they are leaving a great legacy behind.” “I did not know much about the other regions of Louisiana and this museum could be a great source to other Louisianans wanting to know more about their state.” “I realized that this museum is important because it is an organization devoted to researching and assembling exhibits that accurately reflect and educate people about places and people that they may never visit.”

16 Case 3: Service-Learning Abroad Leah Katherine Saal Assistant Professor, Reading & Literacy Studies Arkansas State Univesity

17 Bracketing Factors UniversitySchoolLocal

18 Theoretical Frame Glocalization (Robertson, 1992). Disaster response as a socially situated, culturally relevant practice (Devore & Schlesinger, 1998; Green, 1995; Lum, 1996).

19 Data Sources & Analysis 15 participants (12 pre- service teachers, 3 graduate students) Daily journals Students’ blogs Pre-Post abroad interviews Constant comparative analysis with a-priori codes outlined from theoretical frame Autoethnography The sea gave us sadness, but it depends on us to let the sun shine on our lives and our future.

20 Challenge in Preparing for the Distant Local Legal/ethical frameworks – IRB – Fundraising Social/cultural frameworks – Locus of control/autonomy in partnership – Equity – Cultural relevance

21 Case 4: From the Mid-West to the South: There are Good Schools Everywhere Tynisha D. Meidl Assistant Professor of Education Interim Director of Service-Learning St. Norbert College

22 Theoretical Framework Cultural Competency & Multicultural Awareness  Ability to teach students who are culturally “different” from you.  Recognize, appreciate, and understand the true meaning of cultural sensitivity and competence.  Develop and apply developmentally appropriate teaching methods and materials that are sensitive and relevant to culturally and linguistically diverse student populations.  Provide learning experiences that affirm all learners (Delano-Oriaran, 2013; Banks, 2002; Gay 1994; 2000; Nieto, 2000).

23 Challenges

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25 SemesterActionOutcome Additional Stakeholders Fall 2009 Application for campus based Summer Grant Awarded $2,000 for summer planning and initial visit to New Orleans School Site, Campus Based Program Spring 2010 Interview and Select TRIP Leaders2 Trip Leaders IdentifiedCampus Based Alternative Spring Break office(TRIPS) Fall 2010 Recruit Participants, Interview, Select and Train participants Logistics, Create a fundraising plan 8-10 students apply, evening interviews, Weekly meetings TRIPS office, Teacher Education program January 2010Depart for TRIPStudents fly from Milwaukee and meet in New Orleans TRIPS, Hands On New Orleans, School Based Staff Building a Sustainable partnershop

26 TimelineAction Item AugustSecure Housing Location and Travel September (Early) Review Applications and Interview Potential Participants September (Late) Purchase Travel and Send Payment for Housing, Housing Waiver and Health Forms October- November Plan weekly participant meetings Plan weekly trip leader meetings December On-Line Based course Structure Secure Guest Lectures, Classroom Placements, Secure Service Site January (3 weeks)Course in session Each Fall Semester

27 Case 5: Crafting field experiences in an urban charter school: Demise of a long term partnership In this final demonstration, attendees will be encouraged to critique the series of events that culminated in the demise of a five year partnership. Margaret-Mary Sulentic Dowell Associate professor, Literacy & Urban Education Louisiana State University

28 This study employed three data sources: observations, student reflections, and service-learning course evaluations. Observations, often recorded in a personal reflective journal, s, and written reports became the primary source of data with student reflections, and service-learning course evaluations providing triangulation with observations.

29 Data were analyzed using Creswell’s (1998) and Glaser and Strauss’ (1967) constant comparative method involving a continuous cycle of conception and categorization. Field notes generated from observations, reflections, and service-learning course evaluations were coded line-by-line using open coding. Codes that correlated were merged to form code concepts. Analysis of concepts led to themes. Point of saturation occurred when no new themes emerged.

30 Final themes: 1)the value in cultivating long-term partners, 2)the significance of frequent group reflection in preparing PSTs for teaching in culturally diverse settings, and 3) how turnover threatens sustainability.

31 SemesterPartnerPlacementClassrooms Fall 2009Charter K-5 elementary3 rd, 4 th grade classrooms4 Spring 2010Traditional K-5 elementaryK-5 classrooms12 Fall 2010Charter K-5 elementary2 nd, 3 rd, 4 th grade classrooms6 Spring 2011Charter K-5 elementary1 st grade classrooms2 Fall 2011Charter K-5 elementary1 st grade classrooms2 Spring 2012Charter K-5 elementary1 st grade classrooms2 Fall 2012Charter K-5 elementary1 st grade classrooms2 Spring 2013Charter K-5 elementary1 st grade classrooms2

32 Rapid faculty turnover in the partnering charter school, new leadership, and unethical behavior resulted in this partnership dissolving.

33 Critique Questions Concerns Comments

34 CONTACT US: Margaret-Mary Sulentic Dowell Louisiana State University Estanislado S. Barrera, IV Louisiana State University Jennifer L. Jolly Louisiana State University Leah Katherine Saal Arkansas State University Tynisha D. Meidl St. Norbert College


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