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Guidelines for Library Media Programs in Louisiana Schools Louisiana State Department of Education Cecil J. Picard State Superintendent of Education January.

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Presentation on theme: "Guidelines for Library Media Programs in Louisiana Schools Louisiana State Department of Education Cecil J. Picard State Superintendent of Education January."— Presentation transcript:

1 Guidelines for Library Media Programs in Louisiana Schools Louisiana State Department of Education Cecil J. Picard State Superintendent of Education January 2004

2 Library Media Guidelines on the Web Student Standards and Assessment Division Louisiana Information Literacy Initiative Louisiana Center for Educational Technology – Professional Development

3 Building Partnerships for Learning … Because Student Achievement IS THE BOTTOM LINE Information Power

4 The focus of school library media programs has evolved  from resources (1960, 1969)  to physical access & instructional support (1975, 1988)  to creating a community of learners (1998)

5 Information Power

6 CONTENTS Section 1: Program Guidelines for Louisiana Library Media Programs Summary: Louisiana Standards for Library Media Programs:  Area 1: Learning Environment  Area 2: Information Access & Delivery  Area 3: Program Administration  Area 4: Facilities

7 UNDERLYING PHILOSOPHY OF GUIDELINES The hub of a learning-centered school is an effective, standards-based library media program. A quality library media program improves student achievement. The best measure of the effectiveness of a library media program is the extent of its impact on student learning.

8 AREA 1: LEARNING ENVIRONMENT STANDARD 1 The library media program learning environment supports the mission and goals of the school and promotes the development of skills and attitudes that prepare students for lifelong learning in an information-rich society.

9 AREA 1: LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AREA 1: LEARNING ENVIRONMENT STANDARD 2 The library media program learning environment accommodates all students and their need to read, view, listen, and communicate individually and collaboratively, using traditional and technological resources for ideas, information, and personal development.

10 AREA 1: LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AREA 1: LEARNING ENVIRONMENT STANDARD 3 The library media program learning environment incorporates collaborative planning and collaborative teaching by library media specialist(s) and teachers and integrates information literacy and technology instruction into the curriculum.

11 AREA 1: LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AREA 1: LEARNING ENVIRONMENT STANDARD 4 The library media program learning environment provides an open setting that encourages the widest possible use of resources and active participation in the learning process as well as providing an essential link to the larger community.

12 AREA 1: LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AREA 1: LEARNING ENVIRONMENT STANDARD 5 The library media program learning environment fosters individual and collaborative inquiry in preparing students to become critical thinkers, competent problem-solvers, and life- long learners who contribute productively to society.

13 AREA 1: LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AREA 1: LEARNING ENVIRONMENT STANDARD 6 The library media program learning environment incorporates opportunities for staff development and professional growth for library media staff as well as teachers, administrators and other members of the learning community.

14 STANDARD 2: INDICATOR 1 The library media program incorporates a variety of instructional strategies that address the diverse learning needs of students and other members of the learning community, in mastering the concepts of information literacy and the use of information resources and technology.

15 STANDARD 2: INDICATOR 2 Students utilize traditional and electronic resources, such as CD-ROM, DVD and other fixed electronic formats and access online databases and telecommunications systems, in conducting research across the curriculum.

16 STANDARD 2: INDICATOR 3 The library media specialist uses a variety of techniques and methods to recommend and promote the use of resources to meet students’ individual needs.

17 PHILOSOPHY The primary purpose of the library media program is to foster the development of information literate students who are effective users of ideas and information and become lifelong, independent learners.

18 FOCUS TOPICS Collaborative Planning and Collaborative Teaching Open Access and Flexible Scheduling Reading and Literacy

19 AREA 2: INFORMATION ACCESS STANDARD 7 The library media program has a board- approved materials selection policy that upholds basic principles of access to information and ideas by students and faculty and includes procedures for reconsideration of materials.

20 AREA 2: INFORMATION ACCESS STANDARD 8 Each library media center provides an appropriate collection of print, non-print, and electronic resources that  supports the curriculum and state standards,  meets diverse learning needs of students, and  promotes independent reading and learning appropriate technologies for accessing, producing, and presenting information.

21 AREA 2: INFORMATION ACCESS Standard 8 Each library media center provides an appropriate collection of print, non- print, and electronic resources that  meets diverse learning needs of students, promotes independent reading and learning  supports the curriculum and state standards  promotes independent reading and learning appropriate technologies for accessing, producing and presenting information.

22 AREA 2: INFORMATION ACCESS STANDARD 9 The library media program provides flexible and equitable access to resources and information for all members of the school learning community.

23 AREA 2: INFORMATION ACCESS Collection development in the electronic age means selecting resources that meet high standards of excellence and making them available through a variety of diverse formats and various technologies suited to the educational environment.

24 SELECTION PRINCIPLES research, reading, and life-long learning support and enrich the curriculum meet diverse needs format- print, non-print, electronic, networks high standards of excellence broadly inclusive, themes of universal and timeless interest

25 SELECTION PRINCIPLES outdated, worn, and inappropriate materials are discarded standard selection tools and review sources; personal examination challenge censorship; responsibility to provide information and intellectual enrichment for students and teachers

26 LIBRARY MATERIALS SELECTION POLICY state the philosophy and broad goals of library media collections legal responsibility for selection guidance for school personnel and the community procedures to ensure consistency in practice

27 STANDARDS & GUIDELINES FOR COLLECTIONS Three levels: Basic Advanced Exemplary Use as a measurement tool for improvement

28 GENERAL COLLECTION REQUIREMENTS BOOKS: A minimum of 10 books per pupil NON-PRINT: Access to a variety of non-print and electronic resources REFERENCE: A collection of print and electronic resources

29 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL COLLECTION GUIDELINES Recommendations for specific areas of the collection: Examples for Elementary Guidelines Encyclopedias – 3 general Special encyclopedias- general science, specialized science area, social studies, world cultures & geography Biographical handbooks – 4 on different groups

30 MIDDLE SCHOOL COLLECTION GUIDELINES Recommendations for specific areas of the collection: Examples for Middle School Guidelines Encyclopedias – 3 general Special encyclopedias- general science, specialized science area, social studies, world cultures & geography At least one handbook on each major topic in all areas of the curriculum –15 or more handbooks

31 HIGH SCHOOL COLLECTION GUIDELINES Recommendations for specific areas of the collection: Examples from High School Guidelines Encyclopedias – 4 sets Science, General – general science dictionary & general encyclopedia of science Science, Specific – dictionary, specialized science encyclopedia(s), science handbooks

32 FOCUS TOPIC Resource Alignment To contribute to student achievement, the collection must match the school curriculum and meet students’ developmental, learning, and social needs

33 Resource Alignment Curriculum mapping is a tool that shows who is teaching what and when Collection mapping is a tool that shows numbers & ages of resources in all areas Resource alignment compares the collection and curriculum maps and identifies strengths & weaknesses of the collection

34 FOCUS TOPIC Weeding (De-selection) of Print and Non-Print Materials CHART: Considerations for Retention or Removal of Non- Fiction

35 GUIDELINES FOR TECHNOLOGY AND AUDIO- VISUAL RESOURCES COMPUTER WORKSTATION REQUIREMENTS OTHER HARDWARE AND EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS

36 FOCUS TOPIC Information Technology

37 AREA 3: PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION STANDARD 10: The library media center is staffed by one or more certified professional library media specialist(s) and paraprofessional(s) in accordance with state and/or regional guidelines as applicable.

38 STAFFING GUIDELINES STAFFING GUIDELINES Staffing guidelines are divided into two categories: 1. Schools that are not members of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) 2. Schools that are members of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS)

39 AREA 3: PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION STANDARD 11: The library media program has sufficient … funding for the purchase and maintenance of library resources that, at minimum, ensures that the library media center meets the requirements for a Basic Library Media Program as defined in the guidelines.

40 AREA 3: PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION STANDARD 12 The library media specialist manages the financial, physical, and human resources of the library media center efficiently and effectively.

41 AREA 3: PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION STANDARD 13 The library media specialist, at least bi-annually, leads a program review …utilizing the Library Media Program Rubric and other assessments in developing a strategic plan for improvement.

42 FOCUS TOPIC Copyright

43 AREA 4: FACILITIES STANDARD 14: The library media facility is arranged to accommodate flexible access by classes and individual students; perform basic functions of an effective library media program, provide a climate conducive to learning, and provide access to information and resources within the school and across local and global networks.

44 AREA 4: FACILITIES STANDARD 15 New and renovated library media facilities are of appropriate size and design to provide the physical elements required to support student learning and meet specifications in the Library Media Center Facility Design Principles and Recommendations outlined in these guidelines.

45 AREA 4: FACILITIES Facility Design Principles Facility Recommendations

46 Library Media Program Evaluation Rubric The library media program evaluation rubric provides a framework for assessing the quality of the library media program and its effectiveness in meeting the needs of the school’s learning community.

47 Library Media Program Evaluation Rubric Library Media Program Evaluation Rubric The evaluation measures describe three levels of performance: Basic, Advanced, and Exemplary. BASIC: Evidence that Basic standards are at least partially met. ADVANCED: Evidence that the program exceeds Basic standards and that Advanced standards are at least partially met. EXEMPLARY: Evidence that the program exceeds Advanced standards and that Exemplary standards are at least partially met.

48 SECTION TWO INFORMATION LITERACY GUIDELINES FOR STUDENT LEARNING

49 INFORMATION LITERACY GUIDELINES FOR STUDENT LEARNING Information literate people know how to find, evaluate, and use information effectively…. (American Library Association Presidential Committee on Information Literacy, 1989.)

50 INFORMATION LITERACY GUIDELINES FOR STUDENT LEARNING An information literate student knows how to evaluate and select the best resources, and then extract, record, synthesize, and use information in effective, appropriate, and ethical ways.

51 INFORMATION LITERACY GUIDELINES FOR STUDENT LEARNING The section contains Introduction to Media Literacy Louisiana Content Standards Foundation Skills AASL Information Literacy Standards for Student Learning Louisiana Information Literacy Model for Lifelong Learning Elaborated Louisiana Information Literacy Model with key skills added to each of the seven steps in the model

52 Content Standards Alignment The Grade Level Information Literacy skills are aligned with Louisiana Content Area Standards with special emphasis on: English Language arts standards K-12 Technology Guidelines

53 AASL Information Literacy Skills Formally introduces three categories of information literacy standards: 1. Information Literacy 2. Independent Learning 3. Social Responsibility

54 INFORMATION LITERACY GUIDELINES FOR STUDENT LEARNING FOCUS TOPIC: Teaching the Information Literacy Process This section contains a chart and guiding questions for teaching information literacy in primary grades, upper elementary, middle school and high school

55 Information Literacy Tasks for Primary Grades Task 1: Identify the information need Task 2: Identify and locate an appropriate source of information Task 3: Record relevant information Task 4: Analyze and synthesize information Task 5: Sort, manipulate and logically organize information Task 6: Apply and communicate information and select appropriate presentation format Task 7: Self-evaluation

56 Information Literacy Task Questions for Young Students What do I want to know? Where can I find it? How can I record it? What did I learn? How can I organize what I learned? How can I share what I learned? How did I do?

57 FOCUS TOPIC Assessment Assessment is the process of observing and collecting objective data on students’ progress in learning

58 INFORMATION LITERACY Grade Level Information Literacy Skills, Pre K - Grade 12 Steps of the Information Literacy Model form the framework Aligned with the AASL Information Literacy Standards (Information Power), Louisiana Foundation Skills & Content Standards

59 INFORMATION LITERACY SKILLS - EXAMPLE DEFINING/FOCUSING (Information Literacy Standards 1 & 5; Foundation Skills 1, 2, & 5) Pre-K - develops awareness of a topic by recalling previous experiences. ELA-7-E1 K – brainstorms ideas and information about a topic by recalling previous experiences. ELA-7-E1

60 INFORMATION LITERACY SKILLS - EXAMPLE Grade 3 - brainstorms ideas and information about a topic by recalling previous experiences. ELA-7-E1 - identifies key issues or questions for further exploration. ELA-7-E4

61 INFORMATION LITERACY SKILLS - EXAMPLE Grade 5 - defines an information need and develops a preliminary search plan. - identifies essential (guiding) issues or questions for further exploration. ELA-7-E4

62 INFORMATION LITERACY SKILLS - EXAMPLE Grade 7 - identifies essential (key) questions for exploration, using modeled techniques, and refines questions throughout the research process, as necessary. ELA-7-M4

63 INFORMATION LITERACY SKILLS - EXAMPLE Grade 9 - develops focus questions using modeled techniques and clarifies and refines questions throughout the research process with guidance from school library media specialist and teacher. ELA-7-H4

64 INFORMATION LITERACY SKILLS - EXAMPLE Grade 12: formulates a central research question, thesis statement, or problem for initial or further investigation. develops focus questions using modeled techniques … throughout the research process….

65 INFORMATION LITEARCY SKILLS - EXAMPLE Grade 12, cont. develops a search strategy for a research project with guidance from the library media specialist and teacher. ELA-5-H3

66 Why Does Louisiana Need Library Program Guidelines and Information Literacy Standards? Because Student Achievement IS THE BOTTOM LINE


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