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Compliance of Special Education Laws and related Mandates Data Driven Discipline Act 833(HB 1015) of 2014 Dr. Sherlyn Ezell Powell University of Louisiana.

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Presentation on theme: "Compliance of Special Education Laws and related Mandates Data Driven Discipline Act 833(HB 1015) of 2014 Dr. Sherlyn Ezell Powell University of Louisiana."— Presentation transcript:

1 Compliance of Special Education Laws and related Mandates Data Driven Discipline Act 833(HB 1015) of 2014 Dr. Sherlyn Ezell Powell University of Louisiana (ULM) EDCARE

2 Purpose of Presentation To provide guidance to school-building level administrators regarding process, compliance and accountability related to special education, discipline, and other mandated regulations- Data Driven Discipline Act 136 RS 17:252 (D) Discuss Act 833(HB 1015) of

3 Ensuring & Sustaining Safe, Supportive & Successful Classrooms = ACT 136 – The school master plans required of city, parish, and other local public school boards by this Section shall make provision for pre-service and ongoing grade appropriate classroom management training for teachers, principals, and other appropriate school personnel regarding positive behavioral supports and reinforcement, conflict resolution, mediation, cultural competence, restorative practices, guidance and discipline, and adolescent development. 3

4 State-Wide Instances of Removal from Classroom Type of RemovalTotal Removed In-School Suspension (unduplicated count) 83,707 Out-School Suspension (unduplicated count) 69,066 In-School Expulsion4,800 Out-School Expulsion1,680 TOTAL159,253 When applying just 6.5 hours (1 missed school day excluding 30 min for lunch) for each instance, it totals 1,035,145 hours removed from regular/assigned classroom. Louisiana Department of Education 4

5 Evidence about the Effects of Suspension and Expulsion There is little scientific research to show that zero-tolerance or other “get-tough” measures are effective in reducing school violence or increasing school safety. Several studies have found negative outcomes following suspension and expulsion, such as delinquency, substance abuse and school dropout The three student discipline issues most frequently rated as serious or moderate problems by principals at elementary and secondary level schools were tardiness, absenteeism, and physical violence – Suspension and Expulsion At-A-Glance, Institute for Democracy, Education and Access (2003) 5

6 The Challenge… Translating Act 136 requirements into training material that not only defines the requirements but is also structured so that it is relevant, reasonable and realistic for educators.. 6

7 The Solution… Relevant, Realistic & Reasonable – Applying Requirements and Context into a 3- Tiered Intervention Model for the Classroom – 3-Tiered Model is familiar to Educators and compliments RTI and PBIS models that may be already in place – Step-by-step structure that takes the guess work out of determining intervention next steps – Strategies and activities built in that teachers can also easily incorporate into the classroom. 7

8 Educator Expectations Student Expectations Stages of Development Relevant Rules Routine & Procedures Classroom Arrangement Reinforcement Consequences Building Rapport Cultural Competency Engaging Instruction Background: Traditional Disc. Low-Level Correction Strategies Logical Consequences Peer Mediation Restorative Justice A-B-C’s of Behavior Writing a Behavior Plan Implementing Behavior Plan Analyzing Behavior Plan Whole Class Group of Students Individual Student 8

9 Educator Expectations Student Expectations Stages of Development Relevant Rules Routine & Procedures Classroom Arrangement Reinforcement Consequences Building Rapport Cultural Competency Engaging Instruction Background: Traditional Disc. Low-Level Correction Strategies Logical Consequences Peer Mediation Restorative Justice A-B-C’s of Behavior Writing a Behavior Plan Implementing Behavior Plan Analyzing Behavior Plan MODULE 1 Knowing the “Players” 9

10 Educator Expectations Student Expectations Stages of Development Relevant Rules Routine & Procedures Classroom Arrangement Reinforcement Consequences Building Rapport Cultural Competency Engaging Instruction Background: Traditional Disc. Low-Level Correction Strategies Logical Consequences Peer Mediation Restorative Justice A-B-C’s of Behavior Writing a Behavior Plan Implementing Behavior Plan Analyzing Behavior Plan MODULE 2 Preparing to Learn 10

11 Educator Expectations Student Expectations Stages of Development Relevant Rules Routine & Procedures Classroom Arrangement Reinforcement Consequences Building Rapport Cultural Competency Engaging Instruction Background: Traditional Disc. Low-Level Correction Strategies Logical Consequences Peer Mediation Restorative Justice A-B-C’s of Behavior Writing a Behavior Plan Implementing Behavior Plan Analyzing Behavior Plan MODULE 3 Maintaining a S.S.S.C 11

12 Educator Expectations Student Expectations Stages of Development Relevant Rules Routine & Procedures Classroom Arrangement Reinforcement Consequences Building Rapport Cultural Competency Engaging Instruction Background: Traditional Disc. Low-Level Correction Strategies Logical Consequences Peer Mediation Restorative Justice A-B-C’s of Behavior Writing a Behavior Plan Implementing Behavior Plan Analyzing Behavior Plan MODULE 4 Intervening Low-Level Problem Behavior 12

13 Educator Expectations Student Expectations Stages of Development Relevant Rules Routine & Procedures Classroom Arrangement Reinforcement Consequences Building Rapport Cultural Competency Engaging Instruction Background: Traditional Disc. Low-Level Correction Strategies Logical Consequences Peer Mediation Restorative Justice A-B-C’s of Behavior Writing a Behavior Plan Implementing Behavior Plan Analyzing Behavior Plan MODULE 5 Individual Intervention 13

14 The Big Picture SUCCESSFUL – Academic Learning Outcomes – Social & Emotional Learning Outcomes Both sets of learning outcomes are inter- related and require systems of intervention and support. 14

15 Qualities of Good Students Be eager to learn Work hard Take pride in their work Be organized Be prepared Be willing to learn from mistakes Be honest Attend class unless there’s a good excuse Respect the teacher Respect other students Obey class and school rules 15

16 How Do We Balance????? Various Social Stage of Development Unresolved feelings of inadequacy and inferiority among peers, can have serious problems in terms of competence & self- esteem Most significant relationship is with school & neighborhood Struggle to discover & find his or her own identity “Fitting-in” Developing a sense of morality and right from wrong Withdraw from responsibilities Unsuccessful with this stage tend to experience role confusion & upheaval Be eager to learn Work Hard Take Pride in their work Be organized Be prepared Be willing to learn from mistakes Be honest Attend class unless there is a good excuse Respect the teacher Respect other students Obey class and school rules 16

17 Is it Nature? Is it Nurture? You cannot separate the two…however, which one do YOU have influence over and how can you have influence over it? 17

18 How Can We Nurture? How Can We Nurture? All individuals are motivated by needs. Dr. William Glasser identifies four basic psychological needs that motivate behavior: – Belonging: Fulfilled by loving, sharing, and cooperating with others. – Power: Fulfilled by achieving, accomplishing, and being recognized and respected. – Freedom: Fulfilled by making choices. – Fun: Fulfilled by laughing and playing. 18

19 Background: School-Wide PBIS School-Wide Expectations and rules taught in settings during first week of school School-Wide Reinforcement System in use Minor/Major problem behavior defined Leveled system for dealing with minor/major problem in useHowever………. For effective teaching & learning to take place, these elements need to be used in the classroom! 19

20 Classroom Management = Teacher Self-Management Understand the nature of the “grand delusion” that you are going to “manage” or “control” how someone else acts. However, what we do (how we act) in the classroom does directly influence how our students act. A more accurate description of what effective classroom management requires is “teacher self- management of instructional practices in group settings”. 20

21 Breaking it Down…. Expectations – Think of Expectations like a Mission Statement, the overall purpose. Rules & Routines – Think of rules & routines like a Vision Statement, vivid descriptions of how we will carry out the Mission. Social Skills – The specific skills we need to have to carry out those descriptions and ultimately fulfill the Mission. 21

22 Example of Expectations 22

23 What Does Pride Look Like in the Classroom? EXPECTATIONSCLASSROOM RULES PREPARED Have pen, pencil, binder & A.R. book everyday “ELVIS” is in the building RESPECTFUL Uniform & ID worn appropriately Follow classroom routines Stay clear of JUNK-YARD Behavior! INTEGRITY Be HOT! (Here on Time) KEEP YOUR HEAD..Stay out of the JUNK-YARD! DETERMINED Complete assignments Meet Deadlines Ask for help if I don’t understand EXCELLENT When I do P, R, I & D! 23

24 Social Skills Explicit teaching of classroom rules can be more challenging than teaching rules for other settings because so much of what goes in the classroom is based on interaction with teacher to students and peers to peers. However it is an ESSENTIAL ELEMENT ! DON’T ASSUME! – Respect others comments, opinions & ideas – Say please & thank-you – Mind YOUR business 24

25 Rule to Social Skill KEEP YOUR HEAD and stay clear of JUNK- YARD Behavior! – Eye-rolling – Talking back – Pressuring others – Teasing – Mind Your Own Business What are some social skills lessons that could be created? 25

26 How Do I Decide? As a grade level or on your own: – Gather previous year discipline data of students you will be teaching this school year. – Using the data, grade level teachers determine which social skills to target and then translate those skills into rules but let student have input too! – For older students, strongly encouraged to share the data and allow them to make recommendations as to what the rules should include. Most times, they will come up with the same rules. 26

27 Explicit Teaching is Essential! Repetition and rehearsal are the keys to learning new skills – For a child to learn something new, it needs to be repeated an average of 8 times – For a child to unlearn an old behavior and replace with a new behavior, the new behavior must be repeated and average of 28 times (Harry Wong) 27

28 Explicit Teaching is Essential! We can no longer assume that students know the rules/expectations and appropriate ways to behave We can no longer assume that all students will learn appropriate behaviors quickly and effectively without consistent modeling/practice We MUST assume that students will require different curricula, instructional modalities, etc. to learn appropriate behavior We MUST assume that we need to teach appropriate behaviors/expectations and rules as effectively as we teach academic skills – Louisiana School-Wide Positive Behavior Support Team Training, (53) 28

29 What Happens When We Don’t Plan to Teach Appropriate Behavior? The absence of a plan for teaching desired behaviors may lead to: – Inconsistent administration of consequences – Exclusionary practices that encourage further misbehavior through escape – Disproportionate amounts of staff time and attention to inappropriate behaviors – Miscommunication among staff, students and parents – Over reliance on punishment of problem behaviors 29

30 30

31 “Whereas interventions that foster pro-social behaviors in the classroom frequently lead to improvements in academic performance, interventions designed to improve academic achievement do not show corresponding increases in pro-social classroom behaviors. In essence, this means that educators that respond to mandates of high-stakes testing by stressing content drills in the classroom are missing an important opportunity to promote academic success” (Cobb, 1972; Cobb & Hops, 1973; Coie & Krehbiel, 1984; Hops & Cobb, 1974; Wentzel, 1993) 31

32 Defining Consequences School-wide PBIS process is that each school identify and then specifically define minor & major problem behaviors. Minor = handled in classroom – Talking out – Chewing gum – Inappropriate uniform/no ID Major = handled in office – Fighting – Extreme Classroom Disruption 32

33 System for Addressing Minor/Major Another element of School-wide PBIS is that schools develop a system for dealing with minor & major behaviors – “The 3 Strike Policy” 33

34 Is the Incident Major? 1 st Offense Verbal Feedback & Re-teach Clarify Consequences 2 nd Offense Complete Tracking Form Intervention & Consequence 3 rd Offense Complete Tracking Form Intervention & Consequence Contact Parent 4 th Offense (within 3 weeks) Follow Referral Procedure Reinforce Appropriate Behavior Ceases Write Referral Attach all applicable minor incident forms. Send student with referral to Room 145 Administration will follow-up with course of action and/or consequences 1. Parent contacted (1 day) 2. Teacher provided administrative action (1 day) 3. Incident recorded in data management system (2 days) NoYes 34

35 The Minor Infraction Myth A minor infraction form is not a “classroom referral”. A minor infraction form is a way to document information essential to determining trends – Behavior triggers (environmental factors) – Motivation for inappropriate behavior (functional factors) 35

36 See School Master Plan with ACT 136 spefications See articles on drop out rates of general education students and special education teachers. See memo from USDE on RTI not being a reason to deny IDEA evaluation. See clarification of memo. 36


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