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Youth Transitioning From Foster Care- Realistic Expectations October 6, 2010 TOGETHER WE CAN CONFERENCE 2010 Lafayette Hilton 1521 W. Pinhook Road Lafayette,

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Presentation on theme: "Youth Transitioning From Foster Care- Realistic Expectations October 6, 2010 TOGETHER WE CAN CONFERENCE 2010 Lafayette Hilton 1521 W. Pinhook Road Lafayette,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Youth Transitioning From Foster Care- Realistic Expectations October 6, 2010 TOGETHER WE CAN CONFERENCE 2010 Lafayette Hilton 1521 W. Pinhook Road Lafayette, LA 70503 Carmen E. Spooner, MSW, GSW Karen Grant, MSW, LCSW Louisiana Department of Children and Family Services

2 WHY WE DO WHAT WE DO?

3 VIDEO Louisiana Foster Care: An Introduction Produced by the Louisiana Bar Association, Children’s Law Committee www.lsba.org/fostercare

4 6% Percent of U.S. teens ages 16 to 19 not in school and not high school graduates Louisiana ranks (47 th ) Bottom 10% along with Alaska, Nevada, and New Mexico Source: The Annie E. Casey Foundation 2010 Kids Count Data Book

5 5

6 Many foster care youth face serious problems, such as homelessness, incarceration, victimization, early pregnancy, parenting, underemployment and unemployment

7

8 “It takes a village to raise a child” African Proverb

9 “We learn mostly from those closest to us in our daily lives”. (Daniel Brannen 2005) Elders: -Model appropriate adult behaviors -Mentor youth so that they are able to step into their age-appropriate roles -Reinforce behaviors that are consistent with their social mores -Allow for natural consequences

10 WHO ARE THE ELDERS IN OUR FOSTER YOUTH’S VILLAGES PARENTS SOCIAL WORKERS LAWYERS JUDGES CASA CARETAKERS/DIRECT CARE STAFF INDEPENDENT LIVING PROVIDERS In essence, everyone who touches the youth’s life

11 WHO WE NEED “We must expect and demand from our village that any person working with teenagers, 13 and older, such as foster care workers, foster parents, group home staff, advocates and transitional staff be trained in adolescent development and in delivering developmentally appropriate life skill training. The foster care milieu for teens needs to be entrenched with villagers who want to work with teens and who are trained to know how to best work with them. (Daniel Brannen 2005)

12 WHAT WE KNOW It has been estimated that up to 60% of children in foster care experience some type of developmental delay Reality: Society expects 18 year olds to function independently. Developmentally our former foster youth are functioning in the early adolescence and middle adolescence stages and are not ready to live independently without supports.

13 According to Kools, 1997, premature launching into independent living generally occurs before the adolescent is developmentally ready, for this system imposed milestone.

14 Adolescents & Families for Life14 No youth is going to be placed against his/her will, but "NO" does not mean, "I don't want or need help“. They need to own the process and to be involved every step of the way.

15 WHEN AND HOW DO WE START PREPARING OUR YOUTH FOR THEIR FUTURE? - Start as early as possible, but no later than age 14 -Communicate and start goal setting conversations -Begin where the youth is, no idea or dream is thrown out. All ideas are explored -Provide opportunities for youth to shadow adults in the careers where they show an interest -Identify permanency connections

16 Louisiana has a voluntary program for former foster youth who age out of care Young Adult Program YAP WHERE ARE WE NOW?

17 Young Adult Program (YAP) - Voluntary Program to assist in completing educational or vocational training - Youth may remain in YAP until age 21 - A YAP educational/vocational plan will need to completed within 30 days of youth’s 18th birthday - Youth MUST meet eligibility criteria to be eligible for the Young Adult Program

18  DCFS supported 347 Young Adults via staff support and state and federal dollars direct spending ( 2009-2010 FFY)

19 YOUTH WHO ARE IN SCHOOL FULL TIME –HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA –GED –POST-SECONDARY YOUTH WHO ARE IN SCHOOL PART-TIME –PART-TIME EDUCATION AND PART-TIME WORK=40 HRS

20 ANYONE WHO DOES NOT FIT IN THE AFOREMENTIONED CATEGORIES

21  1201 Number of youth who received Chafee Independent Living Services 2009-2010 FFY

22 Chafee Educational and Training Vouchers (ETV)

23 1) Former OJJ and DCFS youth who: - were in care at age 18 - were adopted after age 16 - guardianship transferred to a relative (kin) after age 16 2) Enrolled in a post-secondary education institution 3) May receive up to a maximum of $5000 per academic year

24 4)You may receive an ETV whether you participate in YAP or not. 5)You may remain in the ETV program up to the age of 23, if you are in school at age 21 and progressing satisfactorily. 6) ETV funds are available in other states through federal Chafee grants

25  347 Chafee Education and Training Vouchers Issued 2009-2010 FFY to Louisiana youth

26  $2977.53 Average amount of Education and Training Vouchers issued 2009-2010 to Louisiana youth

27 WHAT OPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE TO OUR YOUTH TO ADVOCATE FOR THEMSELVES Louisiana Youth Leadership Advisory Council (LYLAC) Statewide board of active foster youth and young adults  20 members, 9 Regions  Ages 16 – 21 Stakeholder membership on National, Regional, State, and local planning committees

28 SERVICES THAT ARE AVAILABLE TO LOUISIANA’S YOUNG ADULTS SNAP – DCFS Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Child Care Assistance

29 WHERE ARE WE GOING  Updating Policy  NYTD Study kicked off October 1, 2010  Increased involvement of foster youth in the planning stages of programs

30  Increase awareness of youth programming  Increase awareness of resources available to youth

31 CHAFEE INDEPENDENT LIVING PROVIDERS REGION I (Orleans) Catholic Charities Archdiocese of New Orleans Independent Living Skills Program 1150 Barataria Blvd. Marrero, LA 70072 Judy Potter, Administrator PHONE: (504) 340-5100 FAX: (504)347-0095 EMAIL: judyilsp@archdiocese-no.orgjudyilsp@archdiocese-no.org REGION II (Baton Rouge) Quad Area Community Action Agency, Inc. Independent Living Skills Program 45300 North Batiste Road Hammond, LA 70401 Sidney Monroe, Program Director PHONE: (225) 567-2350, ext. 207 FAX: (225) 567-2636 EMAIL: sidneymo@quadyouth.orgsidneymo@quadyouth.org

32 REGION III (Covington) Southeastern Louisiana University Independent Living Program Cardinal Newman Hall – Room 105 SLU 10669 Hammond, LA 70402 Linda Isaac, Project Coordinator PHONE: (985) 549-2582 FAX:(985) 549-3758 E-MAIL: linda.isaac@selu.edulinda.isaac@selu.edu REGION IV (Thibodaux) Gulf Coast Teaching Family Services, Inc. Independent Living Program 2509 Petroleum Drive Houma, LA 70363 Stephanie Ward, Program Director PHONE: (985) 853-1445 FAX: (985) 853-0709 E-MAIL: sward@gctfs.orgsward@gctfs.org REGION V (Lafayette) Gulf Coast Teaching Family Services, Inc. Independent Living Program 515 South College Road, Suite 260 Lafayette, LA 70503 Rick Dawes, Program Director (ext. 25) PHONE: (337) 269-1165 FAX: (337) 235-1961 E-MAIL: ilp@gctfs.org (Rick Dawes and all ILSP Staff)ilp@gctfs.org

33 REGION VI (Lake Charles)Youth Services of Southwest Louisiana Independent Living Program 2000 Southwood Drive Lake Charles, LA 70605 Brenda LaFleur, Director PHONE: (337) 474-2682 FAX: (337) 474-4601 E-MAIL: blafleur@aol.comblafleur@aol.com REGION VII (Alexandria) Family Counseling Agency, Inc. Independent Living Program P.O. Box 1908 Alexandria, LA 71309 Henry Marsland, IL Coordinator PHONE: (318) 448-0284 FAX: (318) 448-0280 E-MAIL: famcounsel@aol.com (Henry Marsland)famcounsel@aol.com

34 REGION VIII (Shreveport) Goodwill 800 W. 70th Street Shreveport, LA 71104 Julie Bass, Program Director PHONE: (318) 868-4701 FAX: (318) 868-4936 E-MAIL: julieb@goodwillnla.orgjulieb@goodwillnla.org REGION IX (Monroe) Methodist Children’s Home Independent Living Program Street Address:Mailing Address: 901 South ViennaP.O. Box 929 Ruston, LA 71270Ruston, LA 71273-0929 Angie Thomas, IL DIR PHONE: (318) 255-3717 FAX: (318) 513-2096 E-Mail: angie.thomas@lmch.organgie.thomas@lmch.org

35 Adolescents & Families for Life:35 NRC American Bar Association Center on Children & the LawAmerican Bar Association Center on Children & the Law The Children’s Bureau, US Department of Health & Human ServicesThe Children’s Bureau, US Department of Health & Human Services Child Welfare League of AmericaChild Welfare League of America The Evan B. Donaldson Adoption InstituteThe Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute National Adoption Information ClearinghouseNational Adoption Information Clearinghouse National Court Appointed Special Advocate Association (CASA)National Court Appointed Special Advocate Association (CASA) National Resource Center for Special Needs AdoptionNational Resource Center for Special Needs Adoption National Resource Center for Youth ServicesNational Resource Center for Youth Services National Resource Center for Permanency PlanningNational Resource Center for Permanency Planning North American Council on Adoptable Children (NACAC)North American Council on Adoptable Children (NACAC)

36 3.3 Adolescents & Families for Life: A Toolkit For Supervisors©36 American Association of Retired Persons Grandparents Information CenterAmerican Association of Retired Persons Grandparents Information Center American Bar Association Center on Children & the LawAmerican Bar Association Center on Children & the Law The Children’s Bureau, US Department of Health & Human ServicesThe Children’s Bureau, US Department of Health & Human Services Child Welfare League of AmericaChild Welfare League of America The Evan B. Donaldson Adoption InstituteThe Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute Jane Addams School of Social Work, University. of IllinoisJane Addams School of Social Work, University. of Illinois National Adoption Information ClearinghouseNational Adoption Information Clearinghouse National Court Appointed Special Advocate Association (CASA)National Court Appointed Special Advocate Association (CASA) National Resource Center for Special Needs AdoptionNational Resource Center for Special Needs Adoption National Resource Center for Youth ServicesNational Resource Center for Youth Services National Resource Center for Foster Care & Permanency PlanningNational Resource Center for Foster Care & Permanency Planning

37 Financial Aid Websites National directory to locate financial aid offices: www.finaid.org/otheraid/fao.phtml www.finaid.org/otheraid/fao.phtml Attendance costs for specific schools http://apps.collegeboard.com/search http://apps.collegeboard.com/search Scholarships, loans, financial aid planning, & portals to all federal financial aid websites: www.ed.gov/students www.ed.gov/students Develop & plan, “Types of Aid” Financial Aid resources: www.iseek.org www.collegesummit.org/netewww.iseek.org www.collegesummit.org/nete

38 Chaffee ETV contacts –www.nrcys.ou.eduwww.nrcys.ou.edu –www.statevoucher.orgwww.statevoucher.org –www.fyi3.com/educationwww.fyi3.com/education

39 SCHOLARSHIP WEBSITES www.college-scholarships.com www.orphan.org www.orangewoodfoundation.org/programs www.nfpainc.org

40 SCHOLARSHIP SEARCHES www.fastweb.com www.collegeboard.com www.srnexpress.com www.finaid.org/scholarships –Students with disabilities –DISABILITIES AND GIFTED www.ericec.org

41 SCHOLARSHIPS FOR MINORITIES

42 AFRICAN AMERICANS

43 AMERICAN INDIANS

44 ASIAN AMERICANS & PACIFIC ISLANDERS

45 HISPANICS

46 GAYS, LESBIANS, BI-SEXUALS, AND TRANSGENDERS

47 WEBSITES www.jobsinlouisiana.com www.laworks.net –Youth works www.online.onetcenter.org www.jan.wvu.edu –Job accommodation network www.yourtickettowork.com

48 DCFS Contacts Andrew Wilson (318) 676-7100 Carmen E. Spooner (225)342-4121 Christy Tate (225) 342-4447 D’Juannia Judge (225) 342- Karen Grant (225) 342-3936 Linda Rainey (225) 342-5676 Shelia Madison (225) 342-4060 Foster Care Unit Administrator Toni S. Buxton (225) 342-4006


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