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Rowan University Department of Environmental Health and Safety A Brief Overview for Building Maintenance.

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Presentation on theme: "Rowan University Department of Environmental Health and Safety A Brief Overview for Building Maintenance."— Presentation transcript:

1 Rowan University Department of Environmental Health and Safety A Brief Overview for Building Maintenance

2 Mold Overview Wide variety of molds may be present in building materials Common ones include: Alternaria Aspergillus Penicillium Stachybotrys 2

3 Mold Overview Fungi can be Toxigenic Pathogenic Allergenic Irritant Some Fungi are beneficial and required for good health. All effect individuals differently. 3

4 Mold Overview Adverse effects Runny nose, dermatitis and headaches to aggravation of asthma, allergic reactions and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Toxic effects have only been observed in laboratory settings. Indoor environments cannot present this level of exposure. Exceptions-Silos, post disaster conditions, confined spaces 4

5 Mold Overview Chronic Exposure Claims of Memory Loss, Peripheral Neuropathy, Diminished Capacity, Loss of Consort, and many other significant illnesses Medical Experts do not concur. Would be unlikely to find all cases are unrelated. 5

6 Mold Overview Actual fungal infection in construction is rare (e.g. aspergillosis, histoplasmosis) Most infected persons have only minor symptoms and recover naturally Small percentage of the population 5%) may suffer more severe infections Persons usually have pre-existing condition that makes them susceptible (e.g. immune system impairment) 6

7 Mold Overview Current medical tests can only document exposure to fungi has occurred. Tests cannot determine source, place, or time of exposure. Exposure to fungi occurs naturally in both the indoor and outdoor environments Medical tests are of limited use. 7

8 The Role of Moisture Mold needs water to grow Liquid Water Water Vapor impacting surfaces Other growth requirements are met in every building The only component that can be reasonably controlled is moisture Nutrient Fungal Spores Moisture Temperature Hillmann Environmental Group, LLC

9 Reasons for Mold Growth on Building Materials Moisture accumulation = mold growth Design or construction flaws (improper vapor barriers, leaky roof, failure to provide drainage at foundation walls, etc) Events such as pipe leaks or flooding Failure to protect building materials in storage on job Over air-conditioning Modern, energy efficient buildings, appear more susceptible Airtight construction inhibits drafts and airflow that dry out damp materials 9

10 Reasons for Mold Growth on Building Materials Shipment of New Material may gather moisture. Phasing of Project may allow new Material to be Exposed to Elements. Once Installed, Possibilities Exist for Accidental Moisture Intrusion. 10

11 Obvious indicators of Microbial growth and Contamination are :  Visible growth  Musty Odors resulting from:  Active Growth  Digestion while degrading substrates

12 Rowan University Department of Environmental Health and Safety Water Damaged Materials 12

13 Rowan University Department of Environmental Health and Safety Water Damaged Materials 13

14 Rowan University Department of Environmental Health and Safety Water Damaged Materials 14

15 Rowan University Department of Environmental Health and Safety Water Damaged Materials 15

16 Water Damaged Materials Rowan University Department of Environmental Health and SafetyMold Awareness16

17 Assessing the Situation New York City DOH Guidelines on Assessment and Remediation of Fungi in Indoor Environments “A visual inspection is the most important initial step in identifying a possible contamination problem.” 17

18 Assessing the Situation In most cases visual inspection will be sufficient to identify areas that require remediation. Be sure all contaminated areas are identified. In wallboard material mold growth may extend up to 1 meter beyond what is visible. Inaccessible areas may be your largest concern; Behind wallboard, under wallpaper, below rugs, etc. A moisture meter can be useful in assessing porous materials that may be contaminated and should be disposed. 18

19 Assessing the Situation Contractors frequently ask if sampling or air monitoring should be done The New York DOH Guidelines state: “Bulk or surface sampling is not required to undertake a remediation.” “Air sampling for fungi should not be part of a routine assessment......decisions about appropriate remediation strategies can usually be made on the basis of visual inspection” 19

20 Assessing the Situation Currently there are no occupational exposure limits for fungi in the work place ACGIH is steering clear of numerical values* Must put sampling in context – indoor vs. outdoor concentrations, species diversity If bulk or air monitoring is desired, an experienced professional should be retained Viable vs. Non-viable Sampling A laboratory accredited by the AIHA Environmental Microbiology Laboratory Accreditation Program (EMLAP) should analyze any samples 20 * ACGIH 1999 Bioaerosols Assessment & Control

21 Fungal Contamination During Construction or Renovation Contractors are aware of fungal problems from bird or bat droppings Typically encountered during rehab of older buildings, especially those with attics Increased likelihood that contractors may encounter moldy building materials Materials include drywall, ceiling tiles, carpeting, etc. Common during rehabilitation of historic buildings Buildings subject to flooding or having poor drainage Upgrading of buildings in use 21

22 Fungal Contamination During Construction or Renovation New Construction Microbial Control Specifications being designed into more Construction Documents Building Owners are placing burden on Contractor to control future microbial growth Manufacturers are more aware of mold concerns 22

23 Remediation Guidelines There are no federal regulations regarding mold remediation at this time. NYC DOH are common guidelines NADCA has extensive guidance The most important action is to stop all sources of moisture and dry out materials as quickly as possible using fans and dehumidifiers. 23

24 Remediation Guidelines Ozone air cleaners Not recommended – don’t waste money! A study by US EPA (EPA-600/R Oct. 1995) demonstrated that ozone is not effective for killing airborne fungi even at high concentrations (6-9 ppm) Ion Precipitators-Have not proven to be effective Charcoal Filtration for odor control Face velocity is nearly always too high for effective capture 24

25 Regulations OSHA Regulations Contractors should be aware of other OSHA regulations that may be triggered during a mold remediation project: 29CFR Respiratory protection 29CFR Eye and face protection 29CFR Hazard Communications 29CFR – Sanitation General Duty Clause! 25

26 Additional Information Guidelines on Assessment and Remediation of Fungi in Indoor Environments New York City Department of Health; Bureau of Environmental & Occupational Disease Epidemiology Bioaerosols, Assessment & Control (2 nd Edition) ACGIH American Industrial Hygiene Association Biosafety Committee Environmental Microbiology Laboratory Accreditation Program 26

27 Additional Information National Air Duct Cleaners Association American Society for Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers Internet Sources…Endless! IIRC Guidelines- S500/S520 The Environmental Health and Safety Office x-5105 EHS Website-Concern Form 27

28 Rowan University Department of Environmental Health and Safety ANY QUESTIONS 28


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