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South Carolina’s Prison System Report to the Sentencing Reform Oversight Committee Bryan P. Stirling, Acting Director November 18, 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "South Carolina’s Prison System Report to the Sentencing Reform Oversight Committee Bryan P. Stirling, Acting Director November 18, 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 South Carolina’s Prison System Report to the Sentencing Reform Oversight Committee Bryan P. Stirling, Acting Director November 18, 2013

2 2 SCDC Institution Levels and Population Count Level I (Minimum Security): 8 Institutions Level II (Medium Security): 9 Institutions Level III (Maximum Security): 6 Institutions Female: 3 Institutions Agency Total:26 Institutions* * Within the past 12 months Watkins Pre- Release was closed for housing and repurposed as office space, and a wing at Stevenson CI was closed and the institution was merged with Walden CI. Institutional Count Total (as of November 18, 2013) = 21,933

3 3 Utilized Capacity on November 13, 2013

4 4 Average Daily Population Statistics Fiscal Years SCDC’s Average Daily Population*: - Between June 2001 and June 2013 increased by 1,126 (5.4%) - Between June 2012 and June 2013 decreased by 624 (2.7%) By law, SCDC must provide security, housing, clothing, food, and healthcare. To prepare inmates for reentry into community, SCDC provides education, work, and addiction treatment programs. *Facilities and Authorized Absences.

5 5 SCDC Average Monthly Facility Count

6 6 Actual SCDC Population June 2, 2010 – S.1154 Date of Implementation * The Prison Population Is Moving In The Opposite Direction From What Was Projected By Applied Research Services, Inc. * The high average monthly jurisdictional count for CY 2013 occurred in January High Average Jurisdictional Count CY 1998 – CY 2013 (To Date)

7 7 Annual Admissions to SCDC Fiscal Years

8 8 Monthly Admissions to SCDC September 2011 – October 2013

9 9 Admissions and Releases FY

10 10 Annual Violent and Non-Violent Admissions Fiscal Years

11 11 Violent vs. Non-Violent Population

12 12 SCDC Population Profile as of June 30, 2013

13 13 SCDC Inmates As Of November 15, 2013 Who Have A Gang Affiliation (2,227 Inmates Make Up The 2,356 Memberships) GANGSMEMBERS BLOODS834 FOLK NATION726 FIVE PERCENTERS349 CRIPS174 WHITE SUPREMACY59 ARYAN BROTHERHOOD33 BLACK GANGSTER DISCIPLES19 INSANE GANGSTER DISCIPLES16 SATANIC CULTS14 SATANISM13 SURENOS10 ARYAN NATIONS9 ALL Others100 TOTAL2,356

14 14 All YOA Admissions FY 2008 – FY 2013

15 15 Yearly Violent and Non-Violent Burglary 2 nd Degree YOA Admissions, FY 2008 – FY % Drop in Non-Violent Burglary 2 nd Degree YOA Admissions between FY 2010 and FY 2013

16 16 SCDC Population Profile as of June 30, 2013

17 17 Inmates Age 55 and Older in SCDC Population as of June 30,

18 18 Increasing Demands from More Difficult and More Service-Intensive Inmates More Truth-in-Sentencing (TIS) inmates (ineligible for parole and required to serve 85% of their sentence): –In June 2000, 3,915 inmates (18% of population) –In June 2013, 11,133 inmates (50% of population) –(These inmates have few incentives to reduce negative behaviors.) 13,935 violent offenders (63% of population) 3,034 mentally ill inmates (14% of population) More than half (56%) of the population have medical problems Almost half (48%) cannot read at 9th grade level 8,448 chemically dependent inmates (38% of population)

19 19 Recidivism Rates of Inmates Released During Fiscal Years 2003 – 2010* *Inmates released in FY 2010 and followed for three years, i.e., through FY 2013.

20 20 South Carolina Violent Crime Rates, 1975 – 2011* *Source: South Carolina Department of Public Safety. Rates are number of crimes per 10,000 population.

21 21 South Carolina Property Crime Rates, 1975 – 2011* *Source: South Carolina Department of Public Safety. Rates are number of crimes per 10,000 population.

22 22 FY 2012 Expenditures (Total = $415.6 Million)

23 23 FY 2013 Expenditures (Total = $424.6 Million)

24 24 Young Offender Parole & Re-Entry Services Intensive Supervision Services (ISS) GENERAL INFORMATION  Historically, the recidivism rate for Youthful Offenders released from SCDC has exceeded 50%.  SCDC implemented a new community supervision service called Intensive Supervision during FY  ISS is based on the nationally recognized Intensive Aftercare Program (IAP) Model that utilizes evidence-based practices proven to:  Ensure the successful reentry of Youthful Offenders back into the community;  Assist in the reduction of recidivism;  Improve family and individual functioning;  Ensure community safety;  Reduce victimization.  Through ISS, an Intensive Supervision Officer (ISO) works in the community and is assigned to each Youthful Offender upon admission at SCDC.  ISOs act in a proactive manner in the life of each offender under his/her supervision and manage a caseload of no more than twenty (20) individuals.

25 25 Young Offender Parole & Re-Entry Services Intensive Supervision Services (ISS) ISO GUIDELINES ISO Level of Supervision While an Offender is Incarcerated  Face-to-face visits, one per month.  Completes two onsite residential assessments to ensure suitable placement.  Completes a GRAD 90 Risk/Asset Assessment, which addresses both the risks (mental health issues, substance abuse, sociability concerns, career development) and assets (individual strengths, positive leisure time, family/mentor support, workforce readiness) that have proven prominent to the lives of the Youthful Offender population.  Completes an individualized Case Management Plan (CMP) that incorporates Restorative Justice practices and develops objectives for offenders that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and timely. Examples of objectives include employment, educational placement (vocational or GED), drug testing, substance abuse counseling, mental health services, and parenting skills.  Develops a Community Reentry Team (CRT) that meets regularly to develop resources to assist the offender when reentering society.

26 26 Young Offender Parole & Re-Entry Services Intensive Supervision Services (ISS) ISO Level of Supervision While an Offender is under Parole Supervision in the Community  Face-to-face visits in the community (day, evening and week-end).  First week: three (3)  Second week, onward: one (1) per week, four (4) per month  Ensures that parole conditions are met, to include payment of restitution to crime victims.  Utilizes a series of Graduate Responses (i.e., community service, electronic monitoring, reduce curfew, etc.) to address Technical Violations (i.e., absconding, exceeding curfew, failure of random drug test, etc.).  Utilizes a series of Incentives (i.e., academic recognition, certificate of achievement, extend curfew, etc.) to encourage positive behavior.  Implements then reviews individualized Case Management Plan (CMP) monthly with CRT, updating as offender needs change.

27 27 Young Offender Parole & Re-Entry Services Intensive Supervision Services (ISS) DATA (Current)  Total of 876 offenders are assigned to 49 ISOs  474 (54%) of assigned offenders are on IS parole  402 (46%) of assigned offenders remain in SCDC institutions  A total of 645 Grad-90 Assessments have been completed  Total of 449 random drug tests have been performed on offenders on IS parole  278 (62%) of offenders have passed these random drug tests  171 (38%) of offenders have failed these random drug tests  Total of 207 (44%) offenders in the community are gainfully employed  Total of 110 offenders in the community are enrolled in GED classes

28 28 Young Offender Parole & Re-Entry Services Intensive Supervision Services (ISS) DATA (cont.)  Total of 23 offenders in the community are enrolled in Higher Education  Total of 46 offenders in the community are enrolled in Alternative Education  Total of 70 offenders in the community are involved in Competency Development Programs (not education)  Total of 135 Incentives have been used  388 Graduate Responses have been issued/used  Total of $5, has been paid in restitution to victims  Total of 400 Technical Violations have occurred  Total of 8 (1.7%) of paroled offenders have been returned to SCDC custody for violations

29 29 Centralized and expanded the male pre-release program at Manning CI. Increased the number of inmates from 200 to 600 and the length of the program from 90 days to 180 days to better prepare inmates for release and transition back into the community. Closed one and a half Level 1 (Minimum Security) institutions. Implemented the new Intensive Supervision Services (ISS) program for Youthful Offenders. This was done using the model begun by the Department of Juvenile Justice to reduce recidivism among these young offenders by providing intensive supervision in the community and assisting in their transition from prison to the community. Recent Accomplishments

30 30 Developed and implemented a new paroling authority for Youthful Offenders – the Intensive Supervision Administrative Releasing Authority (ISARA). ISARA was developed to increase offender accountability, enhance public safety and incorporate the victim and community, as well as the offender, as active participants in the paroling process. Developed, tested, validated, and implemented a new evidence-based risk/needs assessment instrument for Youthful Offenders. The Global Risk Assessment Device (GRAD-90) was designed specifically for Youthful Offenders incarcerated at SCDC. It is being used to evaluate the risks and service needs of Youthful Offenders returning to their communities under intensive supervision. This risk/needs assessment instrument is currently being adapted for use with female offenders at SCDC, and, eventually, with the rest of the inmate population. The substance abuse treatment program for Youthful Offenders has been expanded from one to three institutions. Recent Accomplishments (cont.):

31 31 Recent Accomplishments (cont.): During FY 2011, agency budget deficits were eliminated for the first time in three years; employee furloughs have been avoided since then. Overall recidivism rates have declined in each of the last three years. The most recent 3-year return-to-prison rate is 27.5 percent. The average daily inmate population has decreased by 1,259 between FY 2011 and FY (From 23,939 in FY 2011 to 22,680 in FY 2013)


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