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About Joint Programmes and Joint Applications July 19th, 2012, Brussels Tabea Mager, Project Coordinator at Leipzig University.

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Presentation on theme: "About Joint Programmes and Joint Applications July 19th, 2012, Brussels Tabea Mager, Project Coordinator at Leipzig University."— Presentation transcript:

1 About Joint Programmes and Joint Applications July 19th, 2012, Brussels Tabea Mager, Project Coordinator at Leipzig University

2 What is a Joint Programme?  defines Joint Programmes as integrated international degree programmes leading to the award of a Double or Joint Degree.  Core elements that partners plan and implement jointly 1. Curriculum Integration 2. Programme Management (e.g. fee policy, quality assurance) 3. Mobility Scheme 4. Language Policy 5. Qualification (degree certification)

3 Why invest in Joint Programmes?  Take partnerships to a new level of integration and increase own international reputation  Combine partners‘ academic strengths in one JP  Increase programme attractiveness for students - offer well-structured mobility tracks - provide additional competences for an international labour market

4 There are many pieces … … to be put together in Joint Programmes. ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?

5 brought trainees from all over Europe together to …  understand the process of setting up Joint Programmes leading towards a Double or Joint Degree  overcome obstacles on the way  draft relevant documents … solve the puzzle.

6 It all started with  from 2008 until 2010 the EU-funded JOIMAN network collected data on best practises and obstacles in Joint Programmes  89 programmes from different countries and academic backgrounds were investigated in detail and findings were summarised in a report (free download under  common insecurities and gaps of knowledge in the management of Joint Programmes became apparent and JOIMAN addressed them by providing useful templates In the JOIMAN report, a need for training was identified.

7 In 2011 was followed up by  from October 2011 until December 2012 the JOI.CON network is funded as ERASMUS Accompanying Measure in the Lifelong Learning Programme of the European Union  it aims at training current and future coordinators of Joint Programmes in management aspects, including  the project’s centrepiece consists in a Joint Programme Simulation with international academic and administrative staff collaborating admission of students calculating full costs accreditation quality assurance tuition fees grading recognition

8 RESULTS Conference II Bologna June 13th, 2012 KICK-OFF Conference I Leipzig January 18th, 2012 The JOI.CON Year Pre-selected Master and Doctoral teams met in Leipzig and Bologna and meanwhile worked on their fictive programmes via an e-platform. Training: Joint Programme Simulation January 2013 Final project publication will be available for free download at

9 JOI.CON The JOI.CON Training Tracks  international academic and administrative staff selected and trained by University of Graz Masaryk University Vilnius University University of Antwerp  further support by Lille 1 University Utrecht Network DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) Master Track  international academic and administrative staff selected and trained by University of Bergen Lund University 4 teams working on 4 Joint Programmes 2 teams working on 2 Joint Programmes Coordinators JOI.CON Leipzig University JOIMAN University of Bologna Doctoral Track

10 The JOI.CON Team

11 Nationalities of the 56 training participants The JOI.CON Outreach

12 Turning an idea into an application … A joint application basically follows the rules of a Joint Programme  know your partners and their strengths well, and build up on partnerships and networks that have proven trustworthy  plan well in advance (EAM ideal application process: 3-6 months, realistically 1-2 months minimum for writing and coordination of partners)  involve your partners and assign them „homework“ to contribute to your application, at least to carefully proofread at different stages  clearly and realistically define and communicate work loads of all partners and plan the budget accordingly – do not underestimate the coordinator‘s role and expenses  „upgrade slowly“ – take on the coordinator‘s role after you were partner in similar projects (or interview experienced coordinators)

13 Turning an application into a project …  prepare your partners for documents to be submitted speedily in case of the application being selected  Facilitate an early kick-off meeting with all partners and circulate a clear agenda/ proposals to be discussed  use existing networks of all partners (mailing lists etc) to promote your project  communicate reporting duties to partners as early as possible, raise their sense of responsibility for their WPs and their budget part  give partners a chance to evaluate your meetings and the communication with you as coordinator to avoid frustration

14 Turning a project into a report to EACEA …  keep in touch with your project officers and don‘t be shy to ask detailed questions in case of doubt; use network opportunities to interview experienced coordinators  stick to budget shares defined and communicated to partners earlier on – unless that means returning funds that can be used for the project (in that case re-allocate between partners)  define internal reporting deadlines for partners to make them familiar with the formats (time sheets etc) and with their budget share, reserve time for corrections needed  be aware that some changes have to be formally requested by the coordinator well in advance (changes to the workplan etc)

15 Thank you for your attention and good luck with your application. Come visit us at


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