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25 th March 2014 Crewe Alexandra Pupil Premium Review Conference.

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Presentation on theme: "25 th March 2014 Crewe Alexandra Pupil Premium Review Conference."— Presentation transcript:

1 25 th March 2014 Crewe Alexandra Pupil Premium Review Conference

2 Programme for Today Unfortunately Tony Crane, Director of CS is unable to join us today. Real sense of momentum to address the achievement gap for Disadvantaged Learners – today is an important event to : a. share best practice, b. Feedback on strategies being adopted across our schools, c. Outline a range of next steps for schools to consider, d. Plan future PP events and strategies WITH YOU. Therefore, your contributions to today’s event are essential. WARNING..... There is too much information for one meeting. RESOURCES.... Pack on tables including recording framework.

3 Additional resources Separate Sections : CPD & Training Events National Resources Best Practice documents for Schools 3 Separate Sections : CPD & Training Events National Resources Best Practice documents for Schools More to be added as best practice documentation is sourced... Alerts in the BULLETIN

4 Pupil premium: the gap in 2013 The gap gets wider as pupils get older: 19% gap (60%: 79%) in level 4 at 11 27% gap (38%: 65%) in 5A-CsEM at 16 Big variations between schools and between LAs Level 4 gap: Newham 4%; Warrington 14%; Cheshire East 19%; Cheshire West 24% GCSE gap: London < 20%; Warrington 30%; Cheshire West 33%; Cheshire East 38% Attainment of PP pupils – Level 4: Camden 79%; Warrington 69%; Cheshire East 64%; Cheshire West 59% – GCSE: Tower Hamlets 63%; Warrington 41%; Cheshire West 37%; Cheshire East 31% Cheshire East is 140 th out of 150 LAs for PP learners at KS4 Smallest gaps in schools with high or low FSM

5 TheSuttonTrust2011

6 The Pupil Premium report Where Pupil Premium had little impact schools …

7 Where pupil premium had little impact schools…  had a lack of clarity about the intended impact of the spending  spent the funding indiscriminately on teaching assistants, with little impact  did not monitor the quality and impact of interventions well enough, even where other monitoring was effective  did not have a good performance management system for teaching assistants and other support staff  did not have a clear audit trail for where the funding had been spent

8 Where pupil premium had little impact schools…  focused on pupils attaining the nationally expected level at the end of the key stage (Level 4, five A* to C grades at GCSE) but did not to go beyond these expectations, so some more able eligible pupils underachieved  planned their Pupil Premium spending in isolation to their other planning, for example, it was not part of the school development plan  compared their performance to local rather than national data, which suppressed expectations if they were in a low-performing local authority

9 Where pupil premium had little impact schools…  compared the performance of their pupils who were eligible for free school meals with other eligible pupils nationally, rather than all pupils, again lowering expectations  did not focus their pastoral work on the desired outcomes for pupils and did not have any evidence to show themselves whether the work had or had not been effective  did not have governors involved in making decisions about the Pupil Premium, or challenging the way in which it was allocated.

10 The Pupil Premium report made by … Where it went well schools …

11 carefully ring-fenced the funding so that they always spent it on the target group of pupils (F) thoroughly involved governors in the decision making and evaluation process (FG) had a clear policy on spending the Pupil Premium, agreed by governors and publicised on the school website (FG) drew on research evidence and evidence from their own and others’ experience to allocate the funding to the activities that were most likely to have an impact on improving achievement (FS)

12 Where it went well schools… ensured that a designated senior leader had a clear overview of how the funding was being allocated and the difference it was making to the outcomes for pupils (St) ensured that class and subject teachers knew which pupils were eligible for the Pupil Premium so that they could take responsibility for accelerating their progress (St) had a clear and robust performance management system for all staff, and included discussions about pupils eligible for the Pupil Premium in performance management meetings (St)

13 Where it went well schools… never confused eligibility for the Pupil Premium with low ability, and focused on supporting their disadvantaged pupils to achieve the highest levels (ID) thoroughly analysed which pupils were underachieving, particularly in English and mathematics, and why (ID) used achievement data frequently to check whether interventions or techniques were working and made adjustments accordingly, rather than just using the data retrospectively to see if something had worked (D) were able, through careful monitoring and evaluation, to demonstrate the impact of each aspect of their spending on the outcomes for pupils (D)

14 Where it went well schools… understood the importance of ensuring that all day-to-day teaching meets the needs of each learner, rather than relying on interventions to compensate for teaching that is less than good (T) allocated their best teachers to teach intervention groups to improve mathematics and English, or employed new teachers who had a good track record in raising attainment in those subjects (T) made sure that support staff, particularly teaching assistants, were highly trained and understood their role in helping pupils to achieve (T)

15 Where it went well schools… provided well-targeted support to improve attendance, behaviour or links with families where these were barriers to a pupil’s learning (S) systematically focused on giving pupils clear, useful feedback about their work, and ways that they could improve it (S)

16 EEF Toolkit 16 Feedback Peer Tutoring Parental Involvement Small Group tuition One to one tuition Teaching Assistants Mentoring Ability grouping TheSuttonTrust2012

17 EEF Toolkit 17 Feedback Peer Tutoring Parental Involvement Small Group tuition One to one tuition Teaching Assistants Mentoring Ability grouping Meta-cognition & self-regulation Social and emotional learning Mastery Learning Collaborative Learning Reducing class size Individualised instruction Learning Styles TheSuttonTrust2012

18 EEF Toolkit 18 Feedback Peer Tutoring Parental Involvement Small Group tuition One to one tuition Teaching Assistants Mentoring Ability grouping Meta-cognition & self-regulation Social and emotional learning Mastery Learning Collaborative Learning Reducing class size Individualised instruction Summer schools Learning Styles TheSuttonTrust2012

19 The Pupil Premium position in … Where it is going well schools …

20 carefully ring-fenced the funding so that they always spent it on the target group of pupils ensured that a designated senior leader had a clear overview of how the funding was being allocated and the difference it was making to the outcomes for pupils had a clear policy on spending the Pupil Premium, agreed by governors and publicised on the school website thoroughly involved governors in the decision making and evaluation process were able, through careful monitoring and evaluation, to demonstrate the impact of each aspect of their spending on the outcomes for pupils

21 Where it is going well schools… were able to demonstrate the impact of each aspect of their spending on the outcomes for pupils have identified specific budget for pupil premium pupils have created costed action plan for intervention have shared costed action plan with governors have closely monitored and evaluated cost effectiveness have carefully documented audit trail and Pupil Premium case studies detailing impact

22 Where it is going well schools… never confused eligibility for the Pupil Premium with low ability, and focused on supporting their disadvantaged pupils to achieve the highest levels thoroughly analysed which pupils were underachieving, particularly in English and mathematics, and why used achievement data frequently to check whether interventions or techniques were working and made adjustments accordingly, rather than just using the data retrospectively to see if something had worked have a sound grasp of data apply data effectively at all levels analyse data as part of rigorous monitoring of progress use data to challenge pupils and colleagues use data to demonstrate impact

23 Where it is going well schools… drew on research evidence and evidence from their own and others’ experience to allocate the funding to the activities that were most likely to have an impact on improving achievement understood the importance of ensuring that all day-to-day teaching meets the needs of each learner, rather than relying on interventions to compensate for teaching that is less than good apply a range of successful interventions have already raised attainment and progress challenge colleagues to improve classroom teaching and learning measure the impact of interventions

24 Where it is going well schools… understood the importance of ensuring that all day-to-day teaching meets the needs of each learner, rather than relying on interventions to compensate for teaching that is less than good had a clear and robust performance management system for all staff, and included discussions about pupils eligible for the Pupil Premium in performance management meetings focus on Pupil Premium in performance management challenge colleagues to improve classroom teaching and learning establish effective performance management for support staff

25 Where it is going well schools… allocated their best teachers to teach intervention groups to improve mathematics and English, or employed new teachers who had a good track record in raising attainment in those subjects made sure that support staff, particularly teaching assistants, were highly trained and understood their role in helping pupils to achieve have placed good teachers on the C/D borderline have changed the role of Teaching Assistants have focussed INSET on intervention strategies

26 Where it is going well schools… systematically focused on giving pupils clear, useful feedback about their work, and ways that they could improve it ensured that class and subject teachers knew which pupils were eligible for the Pupil Premium so that they could take responsibility for accelerating their progress established whole school marking systems that focus on effective feedback drilled down the use of data and intervention strategies to include all colleagues implemented rigorous monitoring of intervention at all levels

27 Where it is going well schools… provided well-targeted support to improve attendance, behaviour or links with families where these were barriers to a pupil’s learning Key staff target Pupil Premium children: Attendance Officer Family Support Worker EWO Separated Pastoral and Academic Achievement roles Established links with hard-to-reach families Used rewards to motivate disaffected pupils

28 The Pupil Premium position in … Existing Good Practice … 1. Improving the quality of teaching and learning 2. Deployment of staff 3. Re-structuring of staff roles 4. Efficient use of Data 5. School Development Plans 6. Commercial Packages 7. Role of Governors

29 The Pupil Premium 1. Improving the quality of teaching and learning Identifying Pupil Premium champions Drilling down to classroom level Training middle managers

30 The Pupil Premium 2. Deployment of staff Teachers of PP pupils – in-class, small groups Maths and English Appointment of ASTs, SLEs Creating PP posts Training HLTAs and TAs

31 The Pupil Premium 3. Re-structuring of staff roles Separation of pastoral and academic roles Identification of Pupil Premium Managers PP targets in Performance Management Responsibilities linked to Upper Pay Spine PP Responsibility for small numbers

32 The Pupil Premium 4. Efficient use of Data School wide understanding of data Classroom use of data Creating practical ways to measure progress Demonstrating the impact of PP spending

33 The Pupil Premium 5. School Development Plans Specific Pupil Premium targets Costed intervention strategies Staff responsible Intended impact Forecast outcomes

34 The Pupil Premium 6a. Commercial Packages Achievement for All: Closing the Gap focus Literacy: Ruth Miskin, Read-Write-Gold, Super Spell Numeracy: Toe-by-toe, Power by 2, Number Shop Assessment packages: PIXL Study Plus – literacy and numeracy Early Bird Reading, SRA Reading labs Lexia literacy/phonics intervention Blue Hills (linked to SIMS)

35 The Pupil Premium 6b. Commercial Packages Tute: teaching packages for targeted groups Bigfoot Tutors: 1:2:1 tuition Commando Joes: menotring & problem-solving Crick: reading & writing software (Clicker) Explore Learning: maths & English tuition The Brilliant Club: PhD targeted support The Letter Box Club: home library (summer hols) Star reading programme & Access Reading Test

36 The Pupil Premium 7. Role of Governors Reporting to governors Financial accountability Understanding ROL and other indicators Approval of PP strategies Monitoring and evaluating PP outcomes

37 What’s happened since 6 th Feb Conference ? Letter to David Laws following PP Letter to schools. Sharing our strategic interventions with Ofsted – risk of LA Inspection. Establishing this PP Champions Network was a priority. Appointing a PP Champion for Primary Sector. Considering external PP review options – AfA. Vulnerable Grps : Commissioned support for EAL – SC College. Firming up a dedicated budget for PP activities. Considering a range of networks in Core subjects. Evidencing potential PP programmes for schools to commit to. Raising /Explaining the Disadvantaged gap with Elected Members. Working closely with Teaching Schools – integrated working

38 The Pupil Premium Coffee Break After Coffee … Sharing existing practice

39 Pupil Premium

40

41 The Pupil Premium Pupi l premium hot tubs Pupi l prem tubs Pupi l premium hot tubs emium hot tubs Pupi l prem tubs

42 The Pupil Premium position in …  Achievement for All – Martin James - Eaton Bank  Experiencing Ofsted – Paul Reed – Macclesfield  Intervention Strategies – Charlotte Casewell – Sir William Stanier  Governors – Janine Edwards – Malbank  Mentoring – Heidi Thurland – Alsager  Utilising Data – Damian Haigh – Wilmslow Sharing existing practice


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