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Adult Learning in Focus: The National Landscape and a Picture of Illinois Presented by: Pamela Tate President & CEO, CAEL June 2, 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "Adult Learning in Focus: The National Landscape and a Picture of Illinois Presented by: Pamela Tate President & CEO, CAEL June 2, 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 Adult Learning in Focus: The National Landscape and a Picture of Illinois Presented by: Pamela Tate President & CEO, CAEL June 2, 2009

2 About CAEL  CAEL is the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning  A 501(c)3 non-profit organization with almost 35 years of lifelong learning and workforce development experience  Mission to remove barriers so that adult learners can be successful in postsecondary education and training  Offices in Chicago, Philadelphia, Denver, New York and Toronto

3 CAEL’s Unique Integrator Role CAEL Government and Community Employers Colleges and Universities Lifelong Learning Public Policy Workforce Learning and Development

4 Office Jobs  The share of white collar office jobs has risen from 30 to 40 percent of all jobs since  In 1973, only 38 percent of office workers had completed some kind of postsecondary education. Today, 69 percent of them have, while 37 percent have at least a bachelor’s degree.

5 Education and Healthcare Jobs  Since the 1970s, education and healthcare jobs have increased from 10 to almost 20 percent of all jobs.  The share of these jobs requiring at least some college has increased from fewer than half in the 1970s to more than 75 percent today, with more than 52 percent requiring baccalaureate or graduate degrees.

6 Technology Jobs  Technology jobs have doubled from roughly 4 to 8 percent of all jobs.  In 1973, 63 percent of technology workers had completed at least some college, but today 86 percent have—and more than half have at least a bachelor’s degree.

7 Illinois’ Occupational Projections  740,000 jobs will be added to the economy overall  Four industries will account for more than 44% of Illinois’ job growth Education services Health and Community Social Services Computer and Mathematical Services Business, Financial and Management Services Source: Illinois Department of Employment Security, Economic Information and Analysis Division

8 Illinois’ Jobs: What Training and Education are Needed?  342,000 of the overall jobs will require short term, moderate term or long term job training  Almost 322,900 of the overall jobs (44%) will require at least some level of postsecondary vocational training, an Associate’s Degree, a Bachelor’s degree or higher Source: Illinois Department of Employment Security, Economic Information and Analysis Division

9 Adult Learning in Focus: State Performance  2008: CAEL and NCHEMS released National Report on current size and shape of adult learning provision, barriers to adult participation Comparisons among 50 states State by State profiles Policy Framework

10 Percent of Adults Age with College Degrees (Associate and Higher), 2005 Source: U.S. Census Bureau; OECD 54Canada 53Japan Massachusetts52 51Korea 50 Minnesota49 New York48 New Jersey – North Dakota47 Connecticut – Nebraska – New Hampshire45 Colorado – Maryland – South Dakota – Virginia44 Iowa – Vermont43 Illinois – Pennsylvania – Rhode Island42 Washington – Wisconsin41Norway Ireland Belgium 40Denmark Spain Kansas – Utah-Puerto Rico39France UNITED STATES Delaware38Australia Finland Georgia – Hawaii – Maine – Michigan – Montana – North Carolina - Ohio37Sweden Luxembourg California – Florida – Oregon36Iceland Missouri35Netherlands United Kingdom Indiana34Russian Federation Mississippi33Estonia Alabama – Alaska – Arizona – South Carolina – Tennessee – Wyoming32 Kentucky – Oklahoma – Texas31Switzerland New Zealand Idaho – Louisiana – West Virginia30 New Mexico28 Arkansas27 Nevada26Poland 25Greece Germany 20Austria Hungary 19Portugal 18Mexico Chile 17 16Slovak Republic Italy 15 14Czech Republic 12Turkey 10Slovenia 8Brazil United States%OECD Counties

11 11 National Perspective: How Can the U.S. Reach International Competitiveness by 2025? 63,127,642 41,860, Degrees Needed to Meet Best Performance** (55%) Degrees* Produced from 2005 to 2025 with Current Rate of Production plus Population Growth Millions ** Best performance is the average of the top three states. Current Degree Production Combined with Population Growth Vs. Best Performance* on the Student Transition and Completion Measures * Degrees includes both Associates and 4-year degrees. The performance gap is large and we need to increase the rate of degree production in the U.S. by 50.8%.

12 Illinois' Challenge  But of 8,083,210 working-age adults (18 to 64)… percent have not completed college (associate’s degrees or higher) This is a much higher non- completer percentage than the national average. Of these:  1,880,986 have completed some college but no degree  2,249,483 have completed just a high school diploma but have not entered college  1,050,504 have not completed high school or equivalent

13 Proportion of Need-Based Aid Distributed to Part-Time Students Source: NCHEMS Student Financial Aid Survey No Aid to Part-Time Students or Missing Data

14 Average Personal Income of 25 to 64 Year Olds by Level of Education Completed, 2005 $91,797 $107,353 $66,919 $54,532 $37,716 $34,644 $27,367 $0$30,000$60,000$90,000$120,000 Doctorate degree Professional degree Masters degree Bachelors degree Associate degree Some college, no degree High school graduate, or GED 12th grade, no diploma 11th grade 10th grade 9th grade 5th-8th grade 1st-4th grade No school completed Source: US Census Bureau, 2005 American Community Survey If these residents were to complete high school or equivalent, and the additional earnings associated it, the U.S. would experience a $191 billion increase in personal income

15 Average Personal Income of 25 to 64 Year Olds by Level of Education Completed, 2005 $91,797 $107,353 $66,919 $54,532 $37,716 $34,644 $0$30,000$60,000$90,000$120,000 Doctorate degree Professional degree Masters degree Bachelors degree Associate degree Some college, no degree High school graduate, or GED 12th grade, no diploma 11th grade 10th grade 9th grade 5th-8th grade 1st-4th grade No school completed Source: US Census Bureau, 2005 American Community Survey If these residents were to complete an associates degree, and the additional earnings associated it, the U.S. would experience a $848 billion increase in personal income

16 College and University Perspective: How Can Colleges Graduate More Adult Learners?  CAEL’s Adult Learning Focused Institution tools can help colleges and universities recruit and retain adults  One of CAEL's publications, Principles of Effectiveness for Serving Adult Learners, can help make programs more attractive and accessible to adults  All of CAEL’s benchmarking tools, publications, study tours and consulting services are designed for this same purpose

17 Serving Adult Learners Adult-Learning Focused Institutions (ALFI) Project Origins CAEL’s 1999 Benchmarking Study of six high-performing, adult-serving colleges and universities  Best Practices in Adult Learning, a CAEL book  Study findings distilled into eight Principles of Effectiveness for Serving Adult Learners  Assessment Tools released in 2004 Adult Learner Inventory Institutional Self-Assessment Survey

18 CAEL’s ALFI Project CAEL’s Principles of Effectiveness for Serving Adult Learners 1.Outreach: overcoming barriers of time, place, and tradition in order to create lifelong access to educational opportunities 2.Life & Career Planning: aligning personal goals and curriculum 3.Financing: choices in payment options for financial flexibility 4.Assessment of Learning Outcomes: assessing knowledge and skills from life/work experience and formal learning for assignment of credit

19 CAEL’s ALFI Project 5.Teaching-Learning Process: use of multiple methods of instruction 6.Student Support Systems: academic and student support systems to help adults meet the challenges of balancing multiple responsibilities 7.Technology: information technology employed to provide relevant and timely communication 8.Strategic Partnerships: collaborations with employers and other organizations to develop and improve educational opportunities 9.Transitions: supporting guided pathways that lead into and from the institution’s programs and services in order to ensure that students’ learning will apply usefully to achieving their educational and career goals

20 College and University Perspective: How Can Colleges Graduate More Adult Learners?  Expand Prior Learning Assessment options throughout college network in Illinois  PLA can motivate adults to complete degrees  Current Lumina-funded study underway to study outcomes of PLA re: retention, performance, graduation

21 State Policy Change  Institutional innovation is only one element of the picture—new state policies are also needed  Illinois must commit to improving its percentage of adults with a postsecondary credential and allocate new resources toward this goal

22 State Policy Change (cont.)  Financial aid programs for adult and lifelong learners, esp. for adults taking one course at a time  Encourage teaching and assessment on- line to make it more convenient  Social marketing campaign to employers

23 State Policy Change (cont.)  Comprehensive review of all state policies that affect adult learners  Use Adult Learning in Focus policy guide

24 CAEL Contact Information Contact: Pamela Tate, President and CEO, CAEL


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