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Allison Clodfelter, OTS, Jodelle Gordon, OTS, Sarah Lacy, OTS, Erin Russell, OTS, Remick Tiller, OTS, Richard Litterst, OTS, Tina Gelpi, OTD, OTR/L, &

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Presentation on theme: "Allison Clodfelter, OTS, Jodelle Gordon, OTS, Sarah Lacy, OTS, Erin Russell, OTS, Remick Tiller, OTS, Richard Litterst, OTS, Tina Gelpi, OTD, OTR/L, &"— Presentation transcript:

1 Allison Clodfelter, OTS, Jodelle Gordon, OTS, Sarah Lacy, OTS, Erin Russell, OTS, Remick Tiller, OTS, Richard Litterst, OTS, Tina Gelpi, OTD, OTR/L, & Lynn Jaffe, ScD, OTR/L Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL PROCEDURE PURPOSE RESULTS / DISCUSSION METHODS RECOMMENDATIONS REFERENCES Transitioning from school to adult life is a dynamic process and represents a time of change and adaptation within the person and their environment. It signifies a period when individual roles and occupations shift, presenting new challenges and opportunities (Stewart, 2013). The transition to higher education or employment can be very difficult for persons with unique intellectual abilities, also referred to as intellectual disabilities (ID). According to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework, occupations have particular meaning to each individual and are crucial to developing a sense of identity (American Occupational Therapy Association, 2014). The eight areas of occupation include activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), rest and sleep, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation. Individuals with intellectual disabilities often have limited independence, social participation, occupational participation, resources, positive life outcomes, and report having a reduced quality of life due to a combination of these factors (Van Gameren-Oosterom et al., 2013). The purpose of this study was to identify the impact of participation in the Eagle Transition Residential Experience 2014 on independent living skills, social skills, and employment interests of young adults with unique intellectual abilities. For this mixed methods study, quantitative and qualitative data were gathered specific to each participant’s independent living skills, social skills, self- determination, and employment interests. In-home semi-structured interviews were completed with the individual participants in collaboration with one or both parents 4-6 weeks prior to and 6-8 weeks following the residential experience. The interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for content themes. The pre- and post-experience interview content was guided by the Occupational Performance History Interview (OPHI II). The Arc’s Self- Determination Scale and Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning (BDEFS) - Short Form were also administered during the initial interview. The Social Responsiveness Scale-Revised (SRS-2) was completed by a parent on his or her own time prior to and following the residential experience. Interpretation was based upon the PEO theory (Law et al, 1996), reflected in the diagram: Occupation-based Activities to Facilitate Transition Readiness Seven (7) young adults, ages years with autism and other unique intellectual abilities, and five (5) peer mentors, who were current university students, participated in the 9-day, 8-night summer residential experience. Six had experienced a similar program the prior summer. One of the young adults served as a peer mentor. Occupation-based goal setting and achievement were pursued by the young adults in partnership with their peers and peer mentors during the residential experience. A schedule of planned or self-determined activities, such as an educational session on sign language at 10 AM or going to a community baseball game at 7 PM, was maintained and followed daily. Residential experience activities focused on facilitating development of independent living skills, social skills, employment interests, and prompted occupation-based goal setting. Representatives from campus-based and community-based organizations and resources guided active learning sessions on the university campus and in the community. There were a number of positive outcomes. The following are select content themes in the area of the targeted research from the post-interviews with young adults or parents specific to their young adults: Self-Determination/Time Management (Referring to Participant staying home alone): “And I said, wow look at you! I said, what did you do all night? She goes, well first I was on the computer, and then I worked my iPad, and then I watched a little TV, and then I decided I wanted to knit so I went upstairs and got all my knitting stuff…And (father) and I just, we sat down and just went, wow.“ - Mother of Participant 6 Independent Living Skills (ADLs & IADLs) “Participant 2 came back from camp independent. She wants to do everything herself. She doesn't need to be tucked in or anything like that. I think she is more independent every time she comes back from camp.” - Mother of Participant 2 “I always feel he comes back a little more mature when he does camp. I think it’s because of the fact that he is more independent there…” - Mother of Participant 3 “I kind of like doing it independently because it involves me and my personal time.”- Participant 5 Social Interaction/Social Participation “We were in the kitchen. We were talking about what we need to do to be ready for the next day for the party, and she said I want to start a movie club like you started your book club two years ago.”- Mother of Participant 6 Self-advocacy “Yes, she recently went to her boss and said she really would like to increase her hours…So she handed him (a) note, and he said okay, let’s sit down and talk.“ - Mother of Participant 6 1.Allow additional opportunities for practical life skills practice within various environments. 2.Add follow-up evaluation sessions to determine if intervention effects last throughout the year. 3.Collaborate with young adults with unique intellectual abilities, their families, and related community resources to develop a continuum of transition support programs, including the campus-based residential experience, and resources to facilitate the young adults’ self-determined development and participation in the occupations and environments of choice. American Occupational Therapy Association. (2014). Occupational therapy practice framework: Domain and process (3rd ed.). American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68(Suppl.), S1-S48. Law, M., Cooper, B., Strong, S., Stewart, D., Rigby, P., & Letts, L. (1996). The Person- Environment-Occupation model: A transactive approach to occupational performance. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 63(1), Stewart, D. (2013). Transitions to adulthood for youth with disabilities through an occupational therapy lens. Thorofare, NJ: Slack Incorporated. Van Gameren-Oosterom, H., B.M., Fekkes, M., Reijneveld, S.A., Oudesluys-Murphy, A., Verkerk, P.H., Van Wouwe, J.P., & Buitendijk, S.E. (2013). Practical and social skills of year-olds with down syndrome: Independence still far away. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 34(12), doi:http://dx.doi.org/ /j.ridd doi:http://dx.doi.org/ /j.ridd Eagle Transition Program: Impact of an On-Campus Residential Experience for Young Adults with Unique Intellectual Abilities Person Environment Occupation Occupational Performance


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