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2015 Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) Pre-Awards 1.

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Presentation on theme: "2015 Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) Pre-Awards 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 2015 Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) Pre-Awards 1

2 2 Gregg C. McConkey ESG Senior Manager James D. Irby II Program Coordinator Carol Propps-Wright Program Coordinator

3 Welcome & Introductions Purpose and Overview ― The Emergency Solutions Grant ― Definition of Homelessness Program Administration ― Eligible Entities ― Payment to Subrecipients ― Reallocations ― Audit Requirements ― Program Start-Up ― Strategies/Goals ― Performance Standards ― Area Wide Systems Coordination ― Prohibitions — Eligible Activities — Ineligible Activities — Available Funding — BREAK — The Application Package and Procedures — Application Forms Question and Answers Question and Answers/Adjournment 3

4 The Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG) program is authorized by subtitle B of title IV of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11371–11378) as amended by the HEARTH Act. The program authorizes the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to make grants to States, units of general purpose local government, and territories for: the rehabilitation or conversion of buildings for use as Emergency Shelter for the homeless. the payment of certain expenses related to operating Emergency Shelters. Essential services related to Emergency Shelters and Street Outreach for the homeless. Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-housing assistance and Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) 4

5 An individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning: An individual or family with a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings, including a car, park, abandoned building, bus or train station, airport, or camping ground; An individual or family living in a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements(including congregate shelters, transitional housing, and hotels and motels paid for by charitable organizations or by federal, state, or local government programs for low income individuals); or An individual who is exiting an institution where he or she resided for 90 days or less and who resided in an Emergency Shelter or place not meant for human habitation immediately before entering that institution; 5

6 An individual or family who will imminently lose their primary nighttime residence, provided that: The primary nighttime residence will be lost within 14 days of the date of application for homeless assistance; No subsequent residence has been identified; and The individual or family lacks the resources or support networks, e.g., family, friends, faith- based or other social networks, needed to obtain other permanent housing; 6

7 Unaccompanied youth under 25 years of age, or families with children and youth, who do not otherwise qualify as homeless under this definition, but who: Are defined as homeless under section 387 of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act (42 U.S.C. 5732a),section 637 of the Head Start Act (42U.S.C. 9832), section 41403 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994(42 U.S.C. 14043e–2), section 330(h) of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C254b(h)), section 3 of the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2012),section 17(b) of the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 (42 U.S.C. 1786(b)) or section725 of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11434a);section 387 Have not had a lease, ownership interest, or occupancy agreement in permanent housing at any time during the 60 days immediately preceding the date of application for homeless assistance; Have experienced persistent instability as measured by two moves or more during the 60-day period immediately preceding the date of applying for homeless assistance; and Can be expected to continue in such status for an extended period of time because of chronic disabilities, chronic physical health or mental health conditions, substance addiction, histories of domestic violence or childhood abuse (including neglect), the presence of a child or youth with a disability, or two or more barriers to employment, which include the lack of a high school degree or General Education Development (GED),illiteracy, low English proficiency, a history of incarceration or detention for criminal activity, and a history of unstable employment; or A child or youth who does not qualify as ‘‘homeless’’ under this section, but qualifies as ‘‘homeless’’ under section 725(2) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42U.S.C. 11434a(2)), and the parent(s) or guardian(s) of that child or youth if living with her or him. 7

8 Any individual or family who: Is fleeing, or is attempting to flee, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, or other dangerous or life- threatening conditions that relate to violence against the individual or a family member, including a child, that has either taken place within the individual’s or family’s primary nighttime residence or has made the individual or family afraid to return to their primary nighttime residence; Has no other residence; and Lacks the resources or support networks, e.g., family, friends, faith based or other social networks, to obtain other permanent housing. 8

9 An individual or family who: — Has an annual income below 30 percent of median family income for the area, as determined by HUD; — Does not have sufficient resources or support networks, e.g., family, friends, faith-based or other social networks, immediately available to prevent them from moving to an Emergency Shelter or another place described in paragraph (1) of the ‘homeless’’ definition in this section; and 9

10 Meets one of the following conditions: (A) Has moved because of economic reasons two or more times during the 60 days immediately preceding the application for homelessness prevention assistance; (B) Is living in the home of another because of economic hardship; (C) Has been notified in writing that their right to occupy their current housing or living situation will be terminated within 21 days after the date of application for assistance; (D) Lives in a hotel or motel and the cost of the hotel or motel stay is not paid by charitable organizations or by Federal, State, or local government programs for low-income individuals; (E) Lives in a single-room occupancy or efficiency apartment unit in which there reside more than two persons or lives in a larger housing unit in which there reside more than persons reside per room, as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau; (F) Is exiting a publicly funded institution, or system of care (such as a health-care facility, a mental health facility, foster care or other youth facility, or correction program or institution); or 10

11 2) A child or youth who does not qualify as ‘‘homeless’’ under this section, but qualifies as ‘‘homeless’’ under section 387(3) of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act (42 U.S.C.5732a(3)), section 637(11) of the Head Start Act (42 U.S.C. 9832(11)), section41403(6) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (42 U.S.C. 14043e–2(6)), section 330(h)(5)(A) of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C.254b(h)(5)(A)), section 3(m) of the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C.2012(m)), or section 17(b)(15) of the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 (42 U.S.C.1786(b)(15)); or 3) A child or youth who does not qualify as ‘‘homeless’’ under this section, but qualifies as ‘‘homeless’’ under section 725(2) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42U.S.C. 11434a(2)), and the parent(s) or guardian(s) of that child or youth if living with her or him. 11

12 12 All units of local government and public & private non-profit organizations (with certification from the unit of local government in their area) that provide services to the homeless and those at-risk of becoming homeless are eligible to apply for ESG funds. Private non-profit organizations must have a 501(c)3 certification and be registered in the State of South Carolina as a charitable organization.units of local

13 Payments to Subrecipient Disbursement of funds will follow a cost reimbursement procedure and will be for actual funds expended. Subrecipients shall only be reimbursed for costs that have been incurred within the current grant year and corroborated with paid invoices or other evidence of subrecipient expenditure submitted with the Request for Reimbursement (RFR).Request for Reimbursement Subrecipients are reminded that any costs incurred or paid prior to the beginning of the start-up date or after the ending date cannot be reimbursed by the grant. The Grant Period will begin (approximately) July 1, 2015 and ends June 30, 2016. 13

14 Requests for Reimbursements (RFR) are the documents that should be submitted on a monthly basis and must include the following: — Correctly completed RFR forms — Copies of invoices and evidence of payment for the eligible costs for which reimbursement is being sought — Evidence of payment can include check copies and bank statements. The general ledger is not considered evidence of payment for ESG expenditures. Additionally, when bank statements are submitted as evidence of payment, there should be sufficient notation of which items are relevant to the request. — When client services cost are requested i.e. financial assistance for rent, the subrecipient must provide a copy of the applicable documents from the client files to support the eligible expenditures. — Subrecipients are required to submit a data quality report with each RFR so that program participation and data quality can be monitored throughout the duration of the program year. — The final Request for Reimbursement must be submitted to the OEO within 15 days after the expiration of the grant period (by July 15, 2015). Any costs incurred or paid after the ending date cannot be reimbursed by the grant. 14

15 The State reserves the right to reallocate Emergency Solutions Grants Program funds as provided for in the federal regulations governing the program in order to ensure that the funds provide the maximum benefit to South Carolina’s homeless population. Funding (grant award) reallocations will be made on the basis of the State’s determination of the best use of available funds. The State will consider the amount of available funds, subrecipient programmatic performance, subrecipient expenditure levels, and strategic programmatic needs in reallocating available funds. 15 Reallocations Program Administration (cont)

16 Audit Monitoring The ESG team will be monitoring agency’s Match expenditures toward ESG expenses during the program year. The subrecipient must make matching contributions to supplement its ESG program in an amount that equals the amount of ESG funds expended. Diana Graham, Senior manager and the OEO audit team will review the agency’s single audits. Equipment purchases must comply with the Fiscal Guidance and Procedure Manual. The Fiscal Guidance and Procurement Manual is located on the OEO ESG website. 16

17 17 Audit Requirements (cont.) Match Requirement as defined in OMB Circular 200.36 (b). For all Federal awards, any shared costs or matching funds and all contributions, including cash and third party in-kind contributions, must be accepted as [part of the non-Federal entity’s cost sharing or matching when such contributions meet all of the following: Are verifiable from the non-Federal entity’s records; Are not included as contributions for any other Federal award; Are necessary and reasonable for accomplishment of project or program objectives; Are allowable under Subpart E- Cost Principles of this Part; Are not paid by Federal government under another Federal award, except where the Federal statute authorizing a program specifically provides that Federal funds made available for such program can be applied to matching or cost sharing requirements of other Federal programs; Are provided for in the approved budget when required by the Federal awarding agency; and Conform to other provisions of this Part, as applicable

18 Recognition of matching contributions. In order to meet the matching requirement, the matching contributions must meet all requirements that apply to the ESG funds provided by HUD, except for the expenditure limits in § 576.100. The matching contributions must be provided after the date that OEO signs the grant agreement. To count toward the required match for the subrecipient’s fiscal year grant, cash contributions must be expended within the grant period, and noncash contributions must be made within the grant period. Contributions used to match a previous ESG grant may not be used to match a subsequent ESG grant. Contributions that have been or will be counted as satisfying a matching requirement of another Federal grant or award may not count as satisfying the matching requirement of this section. 18 Audit Requirements (cont.)

19 19 Audit Requirements (cont.) Question Text Can shelters use equity with their building as a match source? Also, does it have to be in one fiscal year or could you use 33% for three different fiscal years? No, the value of equity in a building may not be counted as a match. Noncash contributions include "the value of real property... contributed to the recipient's or subrecipient's ESG program, provided that if the recipient or sub recipient had to pay for them with grant funds, the cost would have been allowable. Noncash contributions may also include the purchase value of any donated item." (24 CFR part 576.201(d)(2)) However, the purchase of a building is not an allowable ESG expense, and thus equity value is not an eligible source of match, according to the ESG interim rule. In general, real property equity is not considered an expense but rather an asset. You can access the ESG Interim Rule online here: https://www.onecpd.info/resource/1927/hearth-esg-program-and-consolidated- plan-conforming-amendments/. https://www.onecpd.info/resource/1927/hearth-esg-program-and-consolidated- plan-conforming-amendments/.

20 Single Audit Memo & Certification 20

21 The Grant Period begins July 1, 2015 (approximately) All projects must begin within 2 months of the date funds are made available to the subrecipient. If the program has not started within two (2) months of the award date, without written and justifiable cause, the state reserves the right to rescind the grant award. Start-up is defined as significant expenditure of funds exhibited by the submission of Request for Reimbursement (RFR) to OEO. No extensions. The ESG subrecipient must obligate the funds within 30 days after the date the state makes the funds available. The ESG subrecipient must also expend the funds within the grant period. 21

22 ESG subrecipients have assisted approximately 75,276 individuals and families from 2011 to the present. Goal 1: Provide preventive and rapid re-housing services to approximately 500 low-income individuals and families during Program Year (PY) 2015 to assist them in avoiding or shortening an incidence of homelessness. Goal 2: Provide street outreach and/or shelter services to approximately 12,000 homeless and/or chronically homeless individuals during PY 2015.

23 The State will be utilizing the performance standards set forth in the selection criteria as outlined in Section 427 of the HEARTH Act, which can directly correlate to the above mentioned goals and action steps. The HEARTH Act Section 427 establishes the following: the length of time individuals and families remain homeless; the extent to which individuals and families who leave homelessness experience additional spells of homelessness; the thoroughness of grantees in the geographic area in reaching homeless individuals and families; overall reduction in the number of homeless individuals and families; jobs and income growth for homeless individuals and families; success at reducing the number of individuals and families who become homeless

24 Consultation with Continuums of Care. The subrecipient must consult with each Continuum of Care that serves the subrecipient’s State in determining how to allocate ESG funds each program year; developing the performance standards for, and evaluating the outcomes of, projects and activities assisted by ESG funds; and developing funding, policies, and procedures for the administration and operation of the HMIS. ECHO (Eastern Carolina Homelessness Organization) (803) 492-0048 or (843) 484-0257 Lowcountry Homeless Coalition (843)-737-8370 MACH (Midlands Area Consortium for the Homeless) (803)-733-5421 United Housing Connections (864)-241-0462

25 The age of a child under age 18 must not be used as a basis for denying any family’s admission to an Emergency Shelter that uses Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) funding or services and provides shelter to families with children under age 18. All ESG-funded shelters that either provides shelter to families or women and their children must do so regardless of the age of the child. The family unit must be accepted all inclusive of children under the age of 18. 25

26 Pursuant to the McKinney-Vento Act, to the maximum extent practicable, persons discharged from publicly funded institutions or systems of care should not be discharged into homelessness, including the streets, shelter, or to HUD McKinney-Vento funded homeless projects. ESG-funded shelters are prohibited from assisting with the discharge of a person(s) from any system of care (i.e. prisons, jails, hospitals, substance abuse treatment centers, foster care) that will immediately result in homelessness— residing in the shelter facility. 26

27 ESG subrecipient will be prohibited from collecting program income from any eligible activity. HUD has determined that the act of requiring the security deposits paid by ESG funds on the behalf of eligible clients be returned to the subrecipient in the event that the client vacates the property is earning program income. As such, subrecipients are prohibited from requiring that vendors return security deposit payments to the subrecipient if the client ceases to remain in a dwelling for known or unknown reasons. In the event that clients that have had a security deposit returned to them and are still active or are returning clients, the subrecipient will retain the right to either instruct clients on its use or in the case of a returning client, evaluate how the deposit was utilized in determining continued ESG service. 27

28 Subrecipients may use ESG funds for one or all of the five program components: Street Outreach Component Emergency Shelter Component Homeless Prevention Component Rapid Re-housing Component HMIS Component Minimum Period of Use The subrecipient must provide services to homeless individuals and families for at least the period during which ESG funds are provided. 28 Eligible Activities

29 ESG funds may be used for costs of providing essential services necessary to reach out to unsheltered homeless people; connect them with Emergency Shelter, housing, or critical services; and provide urgent, non facility-based care to unsheltered homeless people who are unwilling or unable to access Emergency Shelter, housing, or an appropriate health facility. For the purposes of this section, the term ‘‘unsheltered homeless people’’ means individuals and families who qualify as homeless under paragraph (1)(i) of the ‘‘homeless’’ definition under § 576.2. The eligible costs and requirements for essential services consist of: Engagement Case Management Emergency health services Emergency mental health services Transportation Services for special populations 29

30 ESG funds may be used for costs of providing essential services to homeless families and individuals in Emergency Shelters, renovating buildings to be used as Emergency Shelter for homeless families and individuals, and operating Emergency Shelters. ESG funds may be used to provide essential services to individuals and families who are in an Emergency Shelter, as follows: Case management Child care Education services Employment assistance/job training Outpatient health services Legal services Life skills training Mental health services Substance abuse treatment services Transportation Services for special populations Renovation Shelter operations Assistance required under the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970 (URA 30

31 Renovated buildings. Each building renovated with ESG funds must be maintained as a shelter for homeless individuals and families for not less than a period of 3 or 10 years, depending on the type of renovation and the value of the building. The ‘‘value of the building’’ is the reasonable monetary value assigned to the building, such as the value assigned by an independent real estate appraiser. The minimum use period must begin on the date the building is first occupied by a homeless individual or family after the completed renovation. A minimum period of use of 10 years, required for major rehabilitation and conversion, must be enforced by a recorded deed or use restriction. Major rehabilitation. If the rehabilitation cost of an Emergency Shelter exceeds 75 percent of the value of the building before rehabilitation, the minimum period of use is 10 years. Conversion. If the cost to convert a building into an Emergency Shelter exceeds 75 percent of the value of the building after conversion, the minimum period of use is 10 years. Renovation other than major rehabilitation or conversion. In all other cases where ESG funds are used for renovation, the minimum period of use is 3 years.

32 ESG funds may be used to provide housing relocation and stabilization services and short- and/or medium-term rental assistance necessary to prevent an individual or family from moving into an Emergency Shelter or another place described in paragraph (1) of the ‘‘homeless’’ definition in § 576.2. This assistance, referred to as homelessness prevention, may be provided to individuals and families who meet the criteria under the ‘‘at risk of homelessness’’ definition, or who meet the criteria in paragraph (2), (3), or (4) of the ‘‘homeless’’ definition in § 576.2 and have an annual income below 30 percent of median family income for the area, as determined by HUD. The costs of homelessness prevention are only eligible to the extent that the assistance is necessary to help the program participant regain stability in the program participant’s current permanent housing or move into other permanent housing and achieve stability in that housing. *Refer to Slides 8 and 9 An individual or family who: — Has an annual income below 30 percent of median family income for the area, as determined by HUD; — Does not have sufficient resources or support networks, e.g., family, friends, faith-based or other social networks, immediately available to prevent them from moving to an Emergency Shelter or another place described in paragraph (1) of the ‘homeless’’ definition in this section; and etc… 32

33 ESG funds may be used to provide housing relocation and stabilization services and short- and/or medium-term rental assistance as necessary to help a homeless individual or family move as quickly as possible into permanent housing and achieve stability in that housing. This assistance, referred to as rapid re-housing assistance, may be provided to program participants who meet the criteria under paragraph (1) of the ‘‘homeless’’ definition in § 576.2 or who meet the criteria under paragraph (4) of the ‘‘homeless’’ definition and live in an Emergency Shelter or other place described in paragraph (1) of the ‘‘homeless’’ definition.‘‘homeless’’ definition *Refer to Slides 5 and 6 An individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, etc…that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings, including a car, park, abandoned building, bus or train station, airport, or camping ground; etc… 33

34 Financial assistance costs: ESG funds may be used to pay utility companies, and other third parties for the following costs: Rental application fees Security deposit Last month’s rent Utility deposits Utility payments Moving cost 34 Services costs: :ESG funds may be used to pay the costs of providing the following services Housing search and placement Housing stability case management Mediation Legal services Credit repair

35 Maximum amounts and periods of assistance The subrecipient may set a maximum dollar amount that a program participant may receive for each type of financial assistance. The subrecipient may also set a maximum period for which a program participant may receive any of the types of assistance or services. Except for housing stability case management, the total period for which any program participant may receive the services must not exceed 24 months during any 3-year period either as an individual or as part of a family. Use with other subsidies Financial assistance cannot be provided to a program participant who is receiving the same type of assistance through other public sources or to a program participant who has been provided with replacement housing payments under the Uniform Relocation Assistance (URA), during the period of time covered by the URA payments. 35

36 The subrecipient may provide a program participant with up to 24 months of rental assistance during any 3-year period. This assistance may be short-term rental assistance, medium-term rental assistance, payment of rental arrears, or any combination of this assistance. Short-term rental assistance is assistance for up to 3 months of rent. Medium-term rental assistance is assistance for 4 months, but not more than 24 months of rent. Payment of rental arrears consists of a one-time payment for up to 6 months of rent in arrears, including any late fees on those arrears. Tenant-based rental assistance. (Project-based rental assistance will not be allowed as it requires HUD-conducted environmental review and approval thereby delaying start- up of the activity). 36

37 Discretion to set caps and conditions The subrecipient may set a maximum amount or percentage of rental assistance that a program participant may receive a maximum number of months that a program participant may receive rental assistance, or a maximum number of times that a program participant may receive rental assistance. The subrecipient may also require program participants to share in the costs of rent. Use with other subsidies Except for a one-time payment of rental arrears on the tenant’s portion of the rental payment, rental assistance cannot be provided to a program participant who is receiving tenant-based rental assistance through other public sources. Rental assistance may not be provided to a program participant who has been provided with replacement housing payments under the URA during the period of time covered by the URA payments. 37

38 Rent restrictions Rental assistance cannot be provided unless the rent does not exceed the Fair Market Rent established by HUD, as provided under 24 CFR part 888, and complies with HUD’s standard of rent reasonableness, as established under 24CFR 982.507. Fair Market Rent For purposes of calculating rent under this section, the rent shall equal the sum of the total monthly rent for the unit, any fees required for occupancy under the lease (other than late fees and pet fees) and, if the tenant pays separately for utilities, the monthly allowance for utilities (excluding telephone) established by the public housing authority for the area in which the housing is located. 38

39 Rental assistance agreement The subrecipient may make rental assistance payments only to an owner with whom the subrecipient has entered into a rental assistance agreement. The rental assistance agreement must set forth the terms under which rental assistance will be provided, including the requirements that apply under this section. The rental assistance agreement must provide that, during the term of the agreement, the owner must give the subrecipient a copy of any notice to the program participant to vacate the housing unit, or any complaint used under state or local law to commence an eviction action against the program participant. 39

40 Late payments The subrecipient must make timely payments to each owner in accordance with the rental assistance agreement. The rental assistance agreement must contain the same payment due date, grace period, and late payment penalty requirements as the program participant’s lease. The subrecipient is solely responsible for paying late payment penalties that it incurs with non-ESG funds. Changes in household composition The limits on the assistance under this section apply to the total assistance an individual receives, either as an individual or as part of a family. Lease Each program participant receiving rental assistance must have a legally binding, written lease for the rental unit, unless the assistance is solely for rental arrears. The lease must be between the owner and the program participant. Where the assistance is solely for rental arrears, an oral agreement may be accepted in place of a written lease, if the agreement gives the program participant an enforceable leasehold interest under state law and the agreement and rent owed are sufficiently documented by the owner’s financial records, rent ledgers, or canceled checks. For program participants living in housing with project-based rental assistance under paragraph (i) of this section, the lease must have an initial term of one year. 40

41 41 Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS) (§§578.3 and 578.57). An HMIS is a computerized data collection application designed to capture client-level information over time on the characteristics of housing and service needs of men, women, and children experiencing homelessness, while also protecting client confidentiality. An HMIS aggregates client-level data to generate an unduplicated count of clients served within a community’s system of homeless services, and can provide data on client characteristics and service utilization.

42 Eligible Cost The subrecipient may use ESG funds to pay the costs of contributing data to the HMIS designated by the Continuum of Care for the area, including the cost of: — Purchasing or leasing computer hardware; — Purchasing software or software licenses; — Purchasing or leasing equipment, including telephones, fax machines, and furniture; — Obtaining technical support; — Leasing office space; — Paying charges for electricity, gas, water, phone service, and high-speed data transmission necessary to operate or contribute data to the HMIS; — Paying salaries for operating HMIS, including: — Completing data entry; — Monitoring and reviewing data quality; — Completing data analysis; — Reporting to the HMIS Lead; — Training staff on using the HMIS or comparable database; and — Implementing and complying with HMIS requirements; 42

43 Eligible Cost cont. — Implementing and complying with HMIS requirements; — Paying costs of staff to travel to and attend HUD-sponsored and HUD approved training on HMIS and programs authorized by Title IV of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act; — Paying staff travel ( Reimbursement of subrecipients’ travel expenses that directly benefit the program will require copies of travel vouchers reporting the dates, points of travel, conference agenda and the purpose for the travel. A separate travel voucher must be completed and signed by each person traveling during the reimbursement period. Copies of receipts must be submitted for hotel bills and common carriers (i.e. airlines). Receipts are not required for meal reimbursement by subrecipients’ employees in travel status, but they must comply with current state levels for travel. Use of a personal vehicle will be reimbursed for allowed travel at the rate per mile established in the budget or the state-approved rate. — costs to conduct intake; and — Paying participation fees charged by the HMIS Lead, if the subrecipient is not the HMIS Lead. The HMIS Lead is the entity designated by the Continuum of Care to operate the area’s HMIS. If the subrecipient is a victim services provider or a legal services provider, it must use a comparable database that collects client-level data over time (i.e., longitudinal data) and generates unduplicated aggregate reports based on the data. Information entered into a comparable database must not be entered directly into or provided to an HMIS. Subrecipients will be required to submit monthly data quality reports to ensure compliance with this provision. 43

44 The Emergency Shelter Grants Program funds may not be used for activities other than those stipulated under 24 CFR Part 576.21, (Eligible Activities). For example, grant amounts may not be used for the following activities including, but not limited to: Rehabilitation services performed by the staff of a subrecipient or recipient, such as preparation of work specifications, loan processing, or inspections; or Renovation, rehabilitation or conversion of buildings owned by primarily religious organizations or entities, unless the conditions stipulated in 24 CFR Part 576.22 are met; Conferences or training in professional fields such as accounting and financial management; Salary of subrecipient’s executive director (except to the extent directly involved in carrying out eligible activities described above). 44 Ineligible Activities

45 Ineligible essential services costs include: Existing services and staff (services must be new or provided to more persons) Salary of case management supervisor when not working directly on participant issues Advocacy, planning, and organizational capacity building Staff recruitment/training Transportation costs not directly associated with service delivery Client or staff personal vehicle expenses such as insurance, taxes, maintenance, and registration. Direct payments to individuals Long-term assistance beyond several months Application for Federal Funds Legal services for immigration and citizenship matters and issues relating to mortgages are ineligible costs. Retainer fee arrangements and contingency fee arrangements are ineligible costs. 45 Ineligible Essential Service Costs

46 Ineligible operating or maintenance costs include: Repair or replacement costs associated with building fixtures (See HUD Memo in Appendices)HUD Memo Recruitment or on-going training of staff Depreciation Costs associated with the organization rather than the supportive housing project (advertisements, pamphlets about organization, surveys, etc.) Staff training, entertainment, conferences or retreats Public Relations or fund raising Bad debts/late fees Mortgage payments Direct assistance payments to clients 46 Ineligible Operational Service Costs

47 An applicant may apply for a maximum of $100,000 for the Street Outreach and/or Emergency Shelter components. An applicant may apply for a maximum of $250,000 for the Homelessness Prevention, Rapid Re-housing and the Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS) components.

48 LET’S TAKE A BREAK 48

49 One application per agency/organization should be submitted to the OEO for consideration. Private non-profit organizations must have a 501(c)3 certification and be registered in the State of South Carolina. OEO must receive an original unbound application and three (3) bound copies no later than 5:00 p.m., on Friday, April 10, 2015. Only completed applications received on or before the due date will be considered for funding. Faxes are not allowed.

50 Cover Page Signature Authorization Form 50

51 You must be registered with the Central Contractor Registry (CCR) before you can submit a grant application through grants. A Data Universal Number System (DUNS) number is required as part of the CCR registration process. The DUNS number is a unique nine-character identification number provided by the commercial company Dun & Bradstreet (D&B). Go to 2015 application forms\Fedgov.dnb.com DUNS via the Web.docx. 2015 application forms\Fedgov.dnb.com DUNS via the Web.docx The process to request a DUNS number takes about 10 minutes and is FREE of charge. Just call D&B at 866-705-5711 or for persons with a hearing impairment, the TTY number is 866-814-7818. You may register online for the CCR at 2015 application forms\Sam.gov or Central Contractor Register (CCR) number.docx/2015 application forms\Sam.gov or Central Contractor Register (CCR) number.docx/ It is important to note, however, that the entire process, including the steps that need to be taken by CCR, takes about 5 days. Section 1 Application Overview

52 Section 1 Applicant Overview 52 Section 2 Past Performance

53 Section 2 OEO Identification of Funding

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56 Each State subrecipient will be provided an Accomplishment Report Form. The subrecipient shall submit a completed Accomplishments Form twice during PY 2015 as outlined below for each major activity category. Accomplishments Report Due dates April 5, 2016 (April 1, 2015 – March 31, 2016) July 15, 2016 (July 1, 2015 – June 30, 2016) Accomplishment Report Forms

57 Only previously funded subrecipients should complete this form to included in their application. Accomplishment Analysis Form Accomplishments Analysis Form (Only previously funded subrecipients should complete this form to included in their application.) Agency Name and Physical Address: Reporting period analyzed (should be previous grant cycle if funded): Analysis of Planned versus Actual Beneficiaries Served During Previous Grant Period: RESIDENTIAL (EMERGENCY OR TRANSITIONAL SHELTERS)(Numbers given as example to indicate formula working. Replace with agency figures.) PlannedActualAchievement Rate Annual Number of Adults Served: #DIV/0! Annual Number of Children Served: #DIV/0! Sub-Total:0 0#DIV/0! NON-RESIDENTIAL SERVICES Annual Number of Adults and Children Served: #DIV/0! Grand Total:00#DIV/0! Narrative Explanation of Results if 100% Achievement Rate was not met:

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61 Application Budget The application budget must be endorsed by the Executive Director and Board Chair.

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65 65 Contact information The Office of Economic Opportunity: Phone: 803-734-0662 ESG Forms located at http://www.oepp.sc.gov/oeo/forms.htm#ESGhttp://www.oepp.sc.gov/oeo/forms.htm#ESG Gregg McConkey: 803-734-2454 Email: gmcconkey@oepp.sc.govgmcconkey@oepp.sc.gov James Irby: 803-734-0390 Email: jirby@oepp.sc.govjirby@oepp.sc.gov Carol Propps-Wright: 803-734-3171 Email: cpmurphy@oepp.sc.govcpmurphy@oepp.sc.gov


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