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Understanding More About Poverty, Monica Bogucki, B.S.W., J.D. 2013 copyright Monica Bogucki Understanding More About Poverty, Monica Bogucki, B.S.W.,

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Presentation on theme: "Understanding More About Poverty, Monica Bogucki, B.S.W., J.D. 2013 copyright Monica Bogucki Understanding More About Poverty, Monica Bogucki, B.S.W.,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Understanding More About Poverty, Monica Bogucki, B.S.W., J.D copyright Monica Bogucki Understanding More About Poverty, Monica Bogucki, B.S.W., J.D copyright Monica Bogucki

2 Where do you apply for government benefits? ▪ Most program are administered by ▪ County Welfare Departments ▪ County Departments of Economic Assistance ▪ County Social Service Agencies

3 What is a Combined Application Form? ▪ Combined Application Form part 1 (CAF 1) ▪ Establishes the application date ▪ Combined Application Form part 2 (CAF 2) ▪ Determines your eligibility for a number of programs such as ▪ MFIP-S, medical assistance, food stamps. Minnesota Supplemental Aid ▪ General Assistance

4 Web site to online CAF application All states-links All states-links 04tanf.htm 04tanf.htm 04tanf.htm 04tanf.htm Minnesota Minnesota /groups/Economic_support/docu ments/pub/dhs_Economic_Supp ort.hcsp /groups/Economic_support/docu ments/pub/dhs_Economic_Supp ort.hcsp /groups/Economic_support/docu ments/pub/dhs_Economic_Supp ort.hcsp /groups/Economic_support/docu ments/pub/dhs_Economic_Supp ort.hcsp

5 MFIP Hypothetical Exercise MARIE

6 General Assistance Hypothetical Exercises JEREMYELLEN

7 Definitions of Poverty ➡ poverty ➡ near poverty ➡ extreme poverty

8 Facts about Poverty ✧ For a family of 3, the federal poverty line is an annual household income of $19, ✧ The extreme poverty line is $9, for a family of 3

9 The Face of Childhood Poverty ✧ 25% of children under age six live in poverty ✧ 48% of all children under age six were LIVING IN OR NEAR POVERTY ✧ In the US, 21% of all children live in poverty ✧ 10% of American children lived in EXTREME poverty Children’s Defense Fund Poverty Fact Sheet publications/data/2011-child-poverty-in-america.pdf

10 Minnesota Poverty In Minnesota, 14 % of all children live in poverty In Minnesota, 14 % of all children live in poverty In Minnesota, 31 % of children live in low income families In Minnesota, 31 % of children live in low income families

11 Homelessness Wilder Research Center 2009 Research Report ▪ At least 9,654 people were precariously housed in Minnesota ▪ 20% of the homeless adults are working full or part-time ▪ Average cost of a one-bedroom apartment in the Twin Cities area is $ 707 and $873 for a two bedroom

12 Wilder Research Study, May homeless children per night 3900 homeless children per night 50% of these children are 5 years old or younger 50% of these children are 5 years old or younger 24% of the parents were recently laid off 24% of the parents were recently laid off

13 130 individuals died while homeless in 2011, Minnesota ▪ 126 individuals died in 2010 ▪ 119 people died while homeless in 2009 ▪ 134 people died while homeless in Minn. (2008) ▪ 106 people died while homeless (2007) ▪ 104 people died while homeless (2004) ▪ 126 people died while homeless (2003) ▪ The age range from infant to 82 years old `

14 continued ▪ 85 people died while homeless (2001) ▪ The ages range from 3 months to 70 years old to 70 years old

15 Who are the homeless? ▪ The average age of a homeless person in the United States is NINE YEARS OLD ▪ 37% are families with children ▪ 25-42% work ▪ 25-30% have mental health impairments ▪ 30% are veterans ▪ 50% homeless women and children have experienced domestic violence ▪ Many are unaccompanied minors

16 Impact of Homelessness on Children It takes an average of 4-6 months for a child to recover academically from a change in schools. ▪ 66% of students who missed 20 or more school ▪ days during first, second and third grade drop out of school ▪ 50% of all children in shelter show signs of anxiety and depression ▪ 10% of all elementary age school children in Minneapolis experience homelessness each year

17 Multiple Obstacles Families and Children Face While Living in Poverty CIRCLE OF POVERTY ▪ Homeless Teens ▪ Community and Family Support ▪ Domestic Abuse ▪ Education ▪ Transportation ▪ Consumer ▪ Housing

18 More Obstacles ▪ Child Care ▪ Health Care-Physical ▪ Health Care-Mental ▪ Employment and Training ▪ Personal

19 What Needs to be Done for Children For Families: ▪Increase safety nets for families ▪Affordable and safe housing ▪Affordable and safe child care ▪Government benefit programs need to be designed as anti-poverty programs

20 Needs for Parents Improved income levels through tax credits and increased minimum wage Improved income levels through tax credits and increased minimum wage Reliable Transportation Reliable Transportation Improved bus schedules to accommodate parents’ work schedules Improved bus schedules to accommodate parents’ work schedules Provide programs where parents can purchase reliable transportation Provide programs where parents can purchase reliable transportation Availability of affordable auto insurance Availability of affordable auto insurance Living Wage Living Wage

21 Health Care Needs: ▪Health insurance for children and parents ▪Mental Health needs –More affordable mental health services available –Health plans should include increased coverage for mental health services –Decrease Stigma about mental health –Increase public education and awareness of mental health

22 Food and Nutrition Food stamp levels should be increased to ensure proper nutrition to families and children Increase the WIC program Increase funding to school lunch programs

23 Educational Needs: ▪Special Education needs to be fully funded and available ▪Need to establish ways that homeless children can continue in the same schools even though the family may have to move several times ▪School programs should encourage family and community involvement to help provide a support network for students and families

24 Welfare Reform ▪ In 1996, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act passed ▪ Minnesota Family Investment Program ▪ MFIP-S, Minn. Stat. 256J et. seq. ▪ 5 year time limit-starting in July 1997

25 Eligibility for Government Benefit Program ▪ Categorical Eligibility ▪ For example, have a minor child for MFIP- S ▪ Financial Eligibility ▪ Income ▪ Assets

26 Government Benefit Programs For Families ▪ MFIP-S-monthly cash assistance program for families ▪ Food Stamps ▪ Medical Assistance ▪ EBT Cards link in Minn. ▪ HS-3315A-ENG

27 Government Benefit Programs ▪ General Assistance ▪ Food Stamps ▪ General Assistance Medical Coverage ▪ For individual or couples without children

28 Government Benefit Programs for Emergencies ▪ MFIP-Emergency Assistance ▪ Emergency General Assistance ▪ Emergency Minnesota Supplemental Assistance (effective Nov. 1, 2011, refers applicants to EGA.

29 Food Support or Food Stamps also known as Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) National National Food Research and Action Center Food Research and Action Center Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-new name \

30 Food Stamp Calculator Example: Example: dstampcalculator dstampcalculator dstampcalculator dstampcalculator

31 What kinds of emergencies do these programs cover? ▪ Mortgage foreclosure ▪ Eviction ▪ Damage deposit ▪ First and last months rent

32 More Emergencies ▪ Utility shut-off ▪ Homeless shelter ▪ Broken furnace ▪ Fire ▪ Flood ▪ Other health and safety repairs on the house

33 Disability Programs through Social Security Administration ▪ Supplemental Security Income Program (SSI) ▪ Retirement, Survivors, Disability Insurance (RSDI)

34 Low Income Families Who are Working ▪ May qualify for programs such as: ▪ Food stamps ▪ Minnesota Care ▪ Emergency Assistance

35 Appeal Rights Client has a right to appeal most unfavorable actions such as: ▪ Termination of benefits ▪ Reduction of benefits ▪ Suspension of benefits ▪ Delay in processing benefits ▪ Sanctions

36 Appeal Time lines ▪ Vary by program ▪ Must move quickly to get continued benefits pending appeal

37 Clients may have many workers ▪ Financial worker ▪ Job counselor ▪ Child care provider ▪ Child care subsidy worker ▪ School, special education ▪ Court system: Social workers, Probation officers ▸ Child protection workers


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