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TITLE X, PART C MCKINNEY-VENTO ACT Understanding The McKinney-Vento Definition of Homeless.

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Presentation on theme: "TITLE X, PART C MCKINNEY-VENTO ACT Understanding The McKinney-Vento Definition of Homeless."— Presentation transcript:

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2 TITLE X, PART C MCKINNEY-VENTO ACT Understanding The McKinney-Vento Definition of Homeless

3 Program Purpose The McKinney-Vento program is designed to address the problems that homeless children and youth have faced in: Enrolling, attending, and succeeding in school Enrolling, attending, and succeeding in school

4 Who Can Be Classified as Homeless? Children who lack: Fixed Fixed Regular Regular Adequate nighttime residence Adequate nighttime residence

5 Fixed, Regular, Adequate Defined: A fixed residence is one that is stationary, permanent, and not subject to change. A fixed residence is one that is stationary, permanent, and not subject to change. A regular residence is one which is used on a predictable or routine basis. A regular residence is one which is used on a predictable or routine basis. An adequate residence is one that is sufficient for meeting both the physical and psychological needs typically met in home environments. An adequate residence is one that is sufficient for meeting both the physical and psychological needs typically met in home environments.

6 Homeless Students: Homeless students are automatically eligible for free school meals. Parents or Guardians of homeless students do not have to fill out the free and reduced lunch form. Homeless students are automatically eligible for free school meals. Parents or Guardians of homeless students do not have to fill out the free and reduced lunch form. Homeless students are to be enrolled immediately Homeless students are to be enrolled immediately Homeless students are to be provided transportation within 72 hours Homeless students are to be provided transportation within 72 hours

7 Eligibility—Who is Covered? Sharing the housing of others due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar reason (sometimes referred to as doubled-up) Sharing the housing of others due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar reason (sometimes referred to as doubled-up) Living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, camping grounds due to lack of adequate alternative accommodations Living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, camping grounds due to lack of adequate alternative accommodations Living in emergency or transitional shelters or Living in emergency or transitional shelters or abandoned in hospitals abandoned in hospitals

8 Eligibility— Who is Covered? (cont.) Children awaiting foster care placement Children awaiting foster care placement Living in a public or private place not designed for humans to live Living in a public or private place not designed for humans to live Living in cars, parks, abandoned buildings, bus or train stations, etc. Living in cars, parks, abandoned buildings, bus or train stations, etc. Migrant children living in housing that is not fixed regular or adequate Migrant children living in housing that is not fixed regular or adequate

9 Barriers to Education: Enrollment requirements: school records, immunizations, proof of residence and guardianship Enrollment requirements: school records, immunizations, proof of residence and guardianship Lack of transportation, school supplies, clothing, etc. Lack of transportation, school supplies, clothing, etc. Poor health, hunger Poor health, hunger Prejudice and misunderstanding Prejudice and misunderstanding High mobility resulting in lack of school stability High mobility resulting in lack of school stability

10 Local Homeless Education Liaisons Every LEA must designate a liaison for students in homeless situations Every LEA must designate a liaison for students in homeless situations Liaison ensures that children and youth in homeless situations are identified and have full and equal opportunity to succeed in school Liaison ensures that children and youth in homeless situations are identified and have full and equal opportunity to succeed in school Liaison is the link with educational services, including preschool and health services Liaison is the link with educational services, including preschool and health services

11 Homeless Liaisons Duties (cont. ) Inform parents, guardians, or youth of educational services, parental involvement opportunities, and transportation services, including to the school of origin Inform parents, guardians, or youth of educational services, parental involvement opportunities, and transportation services, including to the school of origin Post public notice of educational rights Post public notice of educational rights Resolve disputes Resolve disputes

12 Identification Strategies Provide professional development to school staff (registrars, secretaries, counselors, social workers, nurses, teachers, bus drivers, administrators, etc.) Provide professional development to school staff (registrars, secretaries, counselors, social workers, nurses, teachers, bus drivers, administrators, etc.) Coordinate with community services agencies, such as shelters, drop-in centers, welfare and housing agencies, and public health departments Coordinate with community services agencies, such as shelters, drop-in centers, welfare and housing agencies, and public health departments

13 Identification Strategies (cont.) Provide materials and posters where there is a frequent influx of low-income families and youth in high-risk situations, like motels and campgrounds Provide materials and posters where there is a frequent influx of low-income families and youth in high-risk situations, like motels and campgrounds Educate school staff about “warning signs” that may indicate an enrolled child or youth may be homeless Educate school staff about “warning signs” that may indicate an enrolled child or youth may be homeless Make special efforts to identify preschool children Make special efforts to identify preschool children

14 Identification Strategies (cont.) Develop relationships with truancy officials and/or other attendance officers Develop relationships with truancy officials and/or other attendance officers Use enrollment and withdrawal forms to inquire about living situations (an enrollment questionnaire form can be found on the OSDE website, Title X, Part C) Use enrollment and withdrawal forms to inquire about living situations (an enrollment questionnaire form can be found on the OSDE website, Title X, Part C) Avoid using the word "homeless" in initial contacts with school personnel, families, or youth Avoid using the word "homeless" in initial contacts with school personnel, families, or youth

15 School Stability - Key Provisions Students experiencing homelessness have the right to attend one of two schools, according to child’s best interest. Local attendance area school-any public school that students living in the same attendance area are eligible to attend Local attendance area school-any public school that students living in the same attendance area are eligible to attend School of origin-school attended when permanently housed or in which last enrolled School of origin-school attended when permanently housed or in which last enrolled Best interest -keep homeless students in their schools of origin, to the extent feasible, unless this is against the parents’ or guardians’ wishes Best interest -keep homeless students in their schools of origin, to the extent feasible, unless this is against the parents’ or guardians’ wishes

16 Feasibility of School Determination Continuity of instruction Continuity of instruction Age of the child or youth Age of the child or youth Safety of the child or youth Safety of the child or youth Length of stay at the shelter Length of stay at the shelter Where family might find permanent housing Where family might find permanent housing Student’s need for special instruction Student’s need for special instruction Impact of commute on education Impact of commute on education School placement of siblings School placement of siblings Time remaining in the school year Time remaining in the school year

17 Enrollment—Key Provisions Children and youth have the right to enroll in school immediately, even if they do not have required documents, such as school records, medical records, proof of residency, or other documents Children and youth have the right to enroll in school immediately, even if they do not have required documents, such as school records, medical records, proof of residency, or other documents If a student does not have immunizations, or immunization or medical records, the liaison must immediately assist in obtaining them, and the student must be enrolled in the interim If a student does not have immunizations, or immunization or medical records, the liaison must immediately assist in obtaining them, and the student must be enrolled in the interim

18 Enrollment—Key Provisions (cont.) Enrolling schools must obtain school records from the previous school, and students must be enrolled in school while records are obtained Enrolling schools must obtain school records from the previous school, and students must be enrolled in school while records are obtained Schools must maintain records for students who are homeless so they are available quickly Schools must maintain records for students who are homeless so they are available quickly Federal law supercedes state and local laws where there is a conflict [U.S. Constitution, Article VI] Federal law supercedes state and local laws where there is a conflict [U.S. Constitution, Article VI]

19 Resolution of Disputes—Key Provision Each state and LEA must establish dispute resolution procedures Each state and LEA must establish dispute resolution procedures When a dispute over enrollment arises, the student must be admitted immediately to the school of choice while the dispute is being resolved When a dispute over enrollment arises, the student must be admitted immediately to the school of choice while the dispute is being resolved Liaisons must ensure unaccompanied youth are enrolled immediately while the dispute is being resolved Liaisons must ensure unaccompanied youth are enrolled immediately while the dispute is being resolved

20 Homeless Unaccompanied Youth Definition - youth who is homeless and is not in the physical custody of parent or guardian Definition - youth who is homeless and is not in the physical custody of parent or guardian Liaisons must help unaccompanied youth choose and enroll in a school, and inform the youth of his or her appeal rights Liaisons must help unaccompanied youth choose and enroll in a school, and inform the youth of his or her appeal rights School personnel must be made aware of the specific needs of runaway and homeless youth. School personnel must be made aware of the specific needs of runaway and homeless youth.

21 Unaccompanied Youth—Strategies Develop caretaker forms Develop caretaker forms Self-enrollment forms for unaccompanied youth Self-enrollment forms for unaccompanied youth Other forms to replace typical proof of guardianship Other forms to replace typical proof of guardianship Forms should be crafted carefully so they do not create further barriers or delay enrollment Forms should be crafted carefully so they do not create further barriers or delay enrollment Coordinate with other agencies to ensure policies do not create educational barriers Coordinate with other agencies to ensure policies do not create educational barriers

22 Unaccompanied Youth—Strategies Provide unaccompanied youth the opportunity to enroll in diversified learning opportunities, such as vocational education, credit-for-work programs Provide unaccompanied youth the opportunity to enroll in diversified learning opportunities, such as vocational education, credit-for-work programs Provide a “safe place” and trained mentor at school for unaccompanied youth to access as needed Provide a “safe place” and trained mentor at school for unaccompanied youth to access as needed Permit exceptions to school policies on class schedules, tardiness, absences and credits to accommodate the needs of unaccompanied youth Permit exceptions to school policies on class schedules, tardiness, absences and credits to accommodate the needs of unaccompanied youth Assist with credit accrual and recovery Assist with credit accrual and recovery

23 Preschool-Aged Children Liaisons must ensure that families and children have access to Head Start and other public preschool programs administered by the LEA Liaisons must ensure that families and children have access to Head Start and other public preschool programs administered by the LEA Head Start grantees should collaborate and adjust their programs to serve homeless children Head Start grantees should collaborate and adjust their programs to serve homeless children

24 Preschool—Strategies Keep slots open for homeless students Keep slots open for homeless students Provide awareness training for preschool providers Provide awareness training for preschool providers Collaborate with preschools not operated by the LEA or SEA (including Head Start) Collaborate with preschools not operated by the LEA or SEA (including Head Start) Ask parents about preschool-aged children when they enroll their school-aged children in school Ask parents about preschool-aged children when they enroll their school-aged children in school Coordinate with IDEA Child Find Coordinate with IDEA Child Find

25 Access to Services Homeless students must have access to educational services for which they are eligible, including special education, programs for English learners, gifted and talented programs, voc./tech. programs Homeless students must have access to educational services for which they are eligible, including special education, programs for English learners, gifted and talented programs, voc./tech. programs Undocumented children and youth have the same right to attend public school as U.S. citizens and are covered by the McKinney-Vento Act to the same extent as other children and youth (Plyler v. Doe) Undocumented children and youth have the same right to attend public school as U.S. citizens and are covered by the McKinney-Vento Act to the same extent as other children and youth (Plyler v. Doe)

26 Segregation States are prohibited from segregating homeless students in separate schools, separate programs within schools, or separate settings within schools States are prohibited from segregating homeless students in separate schools, separate programs within schools, or separate settings within schools SEAs and LEAs must adopt policies and practices to ensure that homeless children and youth are not segregated or stigmatized on the basis of their status as homeless SEAs and LEAs must adopt policies and practices to ensure that homeless children and youth are not segregated or stigmatized on the basis of their status as homeless

27 Title I and Homelessness A child or youth who is homeless and is attending any school in the district is automatically eligible for Title IA services A child or youth who is homeless and is attending any school in the district is automatically eligible for Title IA services LEAs must reserve (or set aside 1-5%) funds to serve homeless children who attend Title IA and Non-Title IA schools, including providing educational support services to children in shelters and other locations where homeless children may live. LEAs must reserve (or set aside 1-5%) funds to serve homeless children who attend Title IA and Non-Title IA schools, including providing educational support services to children in shelters and other locations where homeless children may live.

28 Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 New Authority Provided further, that funds available under sections 1124, 1124A, 1125 and 1125A of the ESEA may be used to provide homeless children and youths with services not ordinarily provided to other students under those sections, including supporting the liaison designated pursuant to section 722(g)(1)(J)(ii) of the McKinney- Vento Homeless Assistance Act, and providing transportation pursuant to section 722(g)(1)(J)(iii) of such Act.

29 The 2014 appropriations act expands the use of Title I funds to support homeless children and youth for the following requirements under McKinney-Vento:  Local homeless liaison’s salary  Transportation to and from school of origin. New Authority The 2014 appropriations act expands the use of Title I funds to support homeless children and youth for the following requirements under McKinney-Vento:  Local homeless liaison’s salary  Transportation to and from school of origin.

30 May Title I funds be used to support in full an LEA’s homeless liaison’s salary? Yes, as authorized in the FY 2014 appropriations act. Yes, as authorized in the FY 2014 appropriations act. An LEA may reserve funds for this purpose under 34 C.F.R. § (g). An LEA may reserve funds for this purpose under 34 C.F.R. § (g). Previously, a Title I coordinator paid with Title I funds could also be the homeless liaison if those duties were in addition to Title I duties. Previously, a Title I coordinator paid with Title I funds could also be the homeless liaison if those duties were in addition to Title I duties. An LEA may now use FY 2014 Title I funds and Title I carryover funds to fund all or part of a homeless liaison’s salary even if that person has no Title I duties. An LEA may now use FY 2014 Title I funds and Title I carryover funds to fund all or part of a homeless liaison’s salary even if that person has no Title I duties.

31 May Title I funds be used to transport homeless children and youth to their school of origin? Yes, as authorized in the FY 2014 appropriations act. Yes, as authorized in the FY 2014 appropriations act. An LEA may reserve Title I, Part A funds for this purpose under 34 C.F.R. § (g). An LEA may reserve Title I, Part A funds for this purpose under 34 C.F.R. § (g). Absent the FY 2014 appropriations language, the Title I supplement not supplant provisions prohibit an LEA from using Title I funds to pay the costs of transporting homeless children and youth to their school of origin because such services are required under McKinney- Vento Absent the FY 2014 appropriations language, the Title I supplement not supplant provisions prohibit an LEA from using Title I funds to pay the costs of transporting homeless children and youth to their school of origin because such services are required under McKinney- Vento.

32 May Title I funds be used to transport homeless children and youth to their school of origin? (continued) Costs that may be charged to Title I are the incremental costs to transport a homeless child or youth to his or her school of origin that are above what the LEA would otherwise provide to transport the student to his or her assigned school Costs that may be charged to Title I are the incremental costs to transport a homeless child or youth to his or her school of origin that are above what the LEA would otherwise provide to transport the student to his or her assigned school.

33 May an LEA use funds it reserves under ESEA section 1113(c)(3)(A) to pay for a homeless liaison or to provide transportation to the school of origin? No No, but an LEA may reserve additional Title I, Part A funds for these purposes. ESEA section 1113(c)(3)(A) requires an LEA to reserve Title I funds, as necessary, to provide instructional and related services to homeless children and youth who attend non-Title I schools that are comparable to those services the LEA provides to children in Title I schools ESEA section 1113(c)(3)(A) requires an LEA to reserve Title I funds, as necessary, to provide instructional and related services to homeless children and youth who attend non-Title I schools that are comparable to those services the LEA provides to children in Title I schools.

34 May an LEA use funds it reserves under ESEA section 1113(c)(3)(A) to pay for a homeless liaison or to provide transportation to the school of origin? This reservation is required (at least 1%) if an LEA has homeless children and youth who attend non-Title I schools. This reservation is required (at least 1%) if an LEA has homeless children and youth who attend non-Title I schools. If all sites are Title I schools, the 1% set-aside is not a requirement. If all sites are Title I schools, the 1% set-aside is not a requirement.

35 Debbie Pham, Homeless Coordinator Becky Nixon, Homeless Co-Coordinator Alice Byrd, Homeless Co-Coordinator Contacts Contacts Federal Programs Federal Programs Oklahoma State Department of Education

36 Helpful Resources OSDE website:

37 National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth National Center on Homeless Education National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty National Network for Youth


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