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Report of the City of Lawrence Task Force On Homeless Services Commissioner Mike Rundle, Chair June 2005.

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Presentation on theme: "Report of the City of Lawrence Task Force On Homeless Services Commissioner Mike Rundle, Chair June 2005."— Presentation transcript:

1 Report of the City of Lawrence Task Force On Homeless Services Commissioner Mike Rundle, Chair June 2005

2 2 This report is a presentation summary of the Report and Recommendations of the Task Force on Homeless Services. The complete report, together with appendices can be found at: This report is a presentation summary of the Report and Recommendations of the Task Force on Homeless Services. The complete report, together with appendices can be found at:www.lawrenceneighres.org/task_force.shtml IntroductionIntroduction

3 3 BACKGROUNDBACKGROUND Convened May 2003 Convened May 2003 Comprised of 18 members appointed by the Mayor representing elected officials, government and non-profit service providers, business and university persons, faith based organizations, and neighborhood representatives Comprised of 18 members appointed by the Mayor representing elected officials, government and non-profit service providers, business and university persons, faith based organizations, and neighborhood representatives Members were a diverse group who held widely differing opinions on homelessness and homeless services Members were a diverse group who held widely differing opinions on homelessness and homeless services

4 4 CHARGECHARGE To study the problems of homelessness* in Lawrence and gaps in homeless services and make recommendations to the City Commission on ways to address the problems. To study the problems of homelessness* in Lawrence and gaps in homeless services and make recommendations to the City Commission on ways to address the problems. *For the purposes of this study the focus of the problem was on street homelessness

5 5 PROCESSPROCESS Studied the Demographics of the Lawrence Homeless Population Studied the Demographics of the Lawrence Homeless Population Examined Current Services and Service Gaps Examined Current Services and Service Gaps Conducted Research on other Similar Communities and Plans Conducted Research on other Similar Communities and Plans Conducted 7 Public Forums with Stakeholder Groups Conducted 7 Public Forums with Stakeholder Groups Observed Independent Outcomes Observed Independent Outcomes Identified Findings Identified Findings Developed Recommendations using a Consensus Model Developed Recommendations using a Consensus Model Identified Cost Estimates Identified Cost Estimates

6 6 A homeless person is defined by federal law in 42U.S.C as an individual who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence; has a primary nighttime residence that is a: supervised publicly or privately operated shelter designed to provide temporary living accommodations, an institution that provides a temporary residence for individuals intended to be institutionalized, a public or private place not designated for, or ordinarily used as regular sleeping accommodations for human beings. Demographics of the Lawrence Homeless Population

7 7 DemographicsDemographics The general observations and experiences of homeless service providers is that there are approximately 200 homeless individuals living in Lawrence either on the streets, in shelters, in camps, under the bridge etc., at any one time. For the most part this number does not include families who are homeless. This population is partly fluid and changes as transients move in and out of the city. The city conducts periodic homeless counts. The last four were: Date Count* Jan Jan June Jan *The count includes only those willing to be surveyed. The 2005 count is low as many individuals refused to participate. The survey was held at the time a newspaper article was printed alleging a homeless identification badge system was being proposed.

8 8 DemographicsDemographics The Salvation Army Shelter served 305 unduplicated persons between June 2004 and May The average number served nightly ranged from a low of 24 in May 2004 to a high of 49 in January The Lawrence Community Shelter served 237 unduplicated persons in its shelter between June 2004 and May The number served each night was 21. The Lawrence homeless population is predominately male. In the last count 58 % who reported were male and 42% female. Of the 305 persons served by the Salvation Army Shelter in the past 12 months 80% were male and 20% female. Of the 237persons served by the Lawrence Community Shelter during the same period 80% were male and 20% female

9 9 DemographicsDemographics The Lawrence Homeless Population is affected or limited by a number of conditions which are reported through the homeless survey count and shelter intake forms. These are Severe mental health problems39% Alcohol and substance abuse 45% Unemployment80% Lack of socialization and life skills95% 47% of 95 people who responded during the January 2005 Homeless Count said they had some income. 17% had employment income, 10% had social security and disability income and 11% had welfare and general assistance benefits. 35% of the 95 people who responded during the January 2005 Homeless Count said they had lived in Lawrence longer than 3 years. Another 7% said they had lived in the city between 1 and 3 years.

10 10 Current Homeless Housing and Support Services The Salvation Army The Salvation Army Lawrence Community Shelter Lawrence Community Shelter Women’s Transitional Care Services Women’s Transitional Care Services Pelathe Community Resource Center Pelathe Community Resource Center Lawrence-Douglas County Housing Authority Lawrence-Douglas County Housing Authority Lawrence Interdenominational Nutrition Kitchen (LINK) Lawrence Interdenominational Nutrition Kitchen (LINK) Jubilee Café Jubilee Café Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center Faith Based Initiatives Faith Based Initiatives

11 11 Current Homeless Housing and Support Services The Salvation Army The Salvation Army presently provides a year round homeless shelter that can serve up to 125 individuals nightly. The shelter opens at 9 pm and shuts at 8 am daily. Common sleeping space is provided on mats for up to 100 males in the auditorium and 25 females in the dining room. An evening meal is provided. A shower is available. Phone, mail, washer/dryer and transportation to appointments are provided. Space is provided first come first serve to those who have agreed to participate in the Army’s Homeless Services Program which includes mandatory class participation in job and life skills training and twice monthly case management. Clients must also pass a breathalyzer test to stay at the shelter. Between June 2004 and May 2005, the Army served 305 unduplicated individuals in its shelter. The Salvation Army presently provides a year round homeless shelter that can serve up to 125 individuals nightly. The shelter opens at 9 pm and shuts at 8 am daily. Common sleeping space is provided on mats for up to 100 males in the auditorium and 25 females in the dining room. An evening meal is provided. A shower is available. Phone, mail, washer/dryer and transportation to appointments are provided. Space is provided first come first serve to those who have agreed to participate in the Army’s Homeless Services Program which includes mandatory class participation in job and life skills training and twice monthly case management. Clients must also pass a breathalyzer test to stay at the shelter. Between June 2004 and May 2005, the Army served 305 unduplicated individuals in its shelter.

12 12 Current Services Lawrence Community Shelter The Lawrence Community Shelter began as the Lawrence Open Shelter in December 2003 in response to the need to fill a partial gap in shelter services for the homeless. The shelter merged with the Lawrence Drop In Center in January 2005 to become the Lawrence Community Shelter. The shelter provides a 7 night emergency facility for up to 21 individuals and 7 day full service daytime shelter for adults and some families experiencing homelessness. The shelter provides an evening meal and light breakfast, shower facilities, washer/dryer, telephone service, case management and training, transportation to and from detox, rehab, and emergency medical visits. Between June 2004 and May 2005 the shelter served 237 unduplicated individuals in its nighttime shelter. The Lawrence Community Shelter began as the Lawrence Open Shelter in December 2003 in response to the need to fill a partial gap in shelter services for the homeless. The shelter merged with the Lawrence Drop In Center in January 2005 to become the Lawrence Community Shelter. The shelter provides a 7 night emergency facility for up to 21 individuals and 7 day full service daytime shelter for adults and some families experiencing homelessness. The shelter provides an evening meal and light breakfast, shower facilities, washer/dryer, telephone service, case management and training, transportation to and from detox, rehab, and emergency medical visits. Between June 2004 and May 2005 the shelter served 237 unduplicated individuals in its nighttime shelter.

13 13 Current Services Women’s Transitional Care Services Women’s Transitional Care Services provides emergency shelter to battered and other women and children who are fleeing domestic abuse. The shelter location is secret to protect the clients. The shelter has capacity for women and children who may remain for up to 30 days. The staff provides clients with meals and other necessities as well as advocacy, counseling, case management and referral services to support the families transitioning to a new life. The shelter also serves homeless women who are not domestic abuse victims when space is available. In 2004, WTCS served 210 unduplicated clients, 132 were children. Women’s Transitional Care Services provides emergency shelter to battered and other women and children who are fleeing domestic abuse. The shelter location is secret to protect the clients. The shelter has capacity for women and children who may remain for up to 30 days. The staff provides clients with meals and other necessities as well as advocacy, counseling, case management and referral services to support the families transitioning to a new life. The shelter also serves homeless women who are not domestic abuse victims when space is available. In 2004, WTCS served 210 unduplicated clients, 132 were children.

14 14 Current Services Pelathe Community Resource Center The Pelathe Center provides transitional housing and supportive case management services for homeless families in partnership with the Lawrence-Douglas County Housing Authority. The Center owns seven units in the 1400 block of Haskell Avenue dedicated for this cause. The Center provides the case management and supportive services for the families to help them overcome the problems and conditions that led them to becoming homeless. The LDCHA provides rent subsidies to the families with city HOME funds. Each client is limited to 18 months on the program. The Pelathe Center serves 10 families a year through this program. The Pelathe Center provides transitional housing and supportive case management services for homeless families in partnership with the Lawrence-Douglas County Housing Authority. The Center owns seven units in the 1400 block of Haskell Avenue dedicated for this cause. The Center provides the case management and supportive services for the families to help them overcome the problems and conditions that led them to becoming homeless. The LDCHA provides rent subsidies to the families with city HOME funds. Each client is limited to 18 months on the program. The Pelathe Center serves 10 families a year through this program.

15 15 Current Services Lawrence-Douglas County Housing Authority The Lawrence-Douglas County Housing Authority provides about $230,000 annually in rent subsidies for transitional housing to homeless individuals and families using state and city HOME funds. These transitional housing programs are operated in partnership with several local support service organizations including The Bert Nash Mental Health Center, The Salvation Army, The Pelathe Center, OARS, DCCCA, Lawrence Community Shelter and Success by Six. The support service agencies provide the case management and supportive services for the client and the housing authority provides the rent subsidy. Over 100 formerly homeless individuals and families have been successfully housed through this program in the past five years. The Lawrence-Douglas County Housing Authority provides about $230,000 annually in rent subsidies for transitional housing to homeless individuals and families using state and city HOME funds. These transitional housing programs are operated in partnership with several local support service organizations including The Bert Nash Mental Health Center, The Salvation Army, The Pelathe Center, OARS, DCCCA, Lawrence Community Shelter and Success by Six. The support service agencies provide the case management and supportive services for the client and the housing authority provides the rent subsidy. Over 100 formerly homeless individuals and families have been successfully housed through this program in the past five years. The Housing Authority also administers HOPE Building, a housing program for the chronically homeless who have dual diagnosed mental health and substance abuse problems. This 3 year HUD grant can serve up to 10 individuals at a time. The Housing Authority also administers HOPE Building, a housing program for the chronically homeless who have dual diagnosed mental health and substance abuse problems. This 3 year HUD grant can serve up to 10 individuals at a time.

16 16 Current Services Lawrence Interdenominational Nutrition Kitchen (LINK) Lawrence Interdenominational Nutrition Kitchen (LINK) An Interfaith based nutrition kitchen open to all that provides a hot lunch Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays. The program serves about 150 lunches per day. It operates out of the First Christian Church. Jubilee Café Jubilee Café A KU and community volunteer program that provides a full hot breakfast to all Tuesday and Friday mornings at 7 am. It operates out of the First United Methodist Church and serves 140 meals a day. The Salvation Army The Salvation Army Provides a hot lunch Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays which is open to all. It serves between 80 and 100 meals. Lawrence Community Shelter Lawrence Community Shelter Serves breakfast to all when the Jubilee Café is closed.

17 17 Current Services The Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center The Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center The Bert Nash Center is the local community health center providing clinical treatment and case management services for adults and children in Douglas County with mental health problems that range from mild temporary depression to severe and profound mental illness. The center has a Community Support Services program that serves mentally disabled homeless individuals or individuals who were previously homeless. It also operates a small permanent housing program for four of its clients in a facility it owns. It partners with the LDCHA in providing case management services for its clients in a transitional housing program for the homeless operated by the LDCHA.

18 18 Current Services Faith Based Initiatives Faith Based Initiatives The local churches have long been a source of funding and support to homeless individuals and others at risk of homelessness by providing needed resources in times of crisis and difficulty. This includes food, shelter, clothing, rent and utility assistance, transportation, medical and other human services. The Lawrence Community Inter Faith Initiative (LCII) The Lawrence Community Inter Faith Initiative (LCII) Meets to coordinate a unified effort among 180 faith organizations to provide support and services to prevent homelessness and assist in homeless service gaps.

19 19 Current Services Other Support Service Agencies ECKAN ECKAN Ballard Community Center and Penn House Ballard Community Center and Penn House Emergency Services Council Emergency Services Council Social Service League Social Service League Douglas County Dental Clinic Douglas County Dental Clinic DCCCA Center DCCCA Center Health Care Access Health Care Access Heartland Medical Clinic Heartland Medical Clinic

20 20 Homeless Service Gaps Mental Health In-patient Services Mental Health In-patient Services Permanent Transitional Housing for Persons Released from the State Mental Hospital Permanent Transitional Housing for Persons Released from the State Mental Hospital Permanent 24 hour Emergency Shelter for individuals and families with structured living and daily activities Permanent 24 hour Emergency Shelter for individuals and families with structured living and daily activities Additional Transitional Housing Additional Transitional Housing Coordination of Service Providers Coordination of Service Providers Coordination of Information on Local Homeless Individuals (HMIS) Coordination of Information on Local Homeless Individuals (HMIS) Comprehensive Case Management Services Comprehensive Case Management Services Long Term Outreach to the Homeless Long Term Outreach to the Homeless Social Detoxification Program Social Detoxification Program A Task Force subcommittee conducted a study of homeless service gaps in Lawrence during 2003/2004 and found the following needs.

21 21 Homeless Service Gaps Reliable and Consistent Transportation Reliable and Consistent Transportation Homeless Prevention Services Homeless Prevention Services Job Readiness Training and Preparation Job Readiness Training and Preparation Business Network to Establish Job Opportunities Business Network to Establish Job Opportunities Life Skills Training Life Skills Training Peer Support and Adult Mentoring Peer Support and Adult Mentoring Landlord Mentoring and Support Assistance Landlord Mentoring and Support Assistance Clear Policy Guidelines for Police Officers and City Officials Clear Policy Guidelines for Police Officers and City Officials Law Enforcement Training on Handling Persons with Mental Health or Substance Abuse Problems Law Enforcement Training on Handling Persons with Mental Health or Substance Abuse Problems Medication Cost Assistance Medication Cost Assistance Payee Services Payee Services

22 22 Research on Other Similar Communities and Plans Plans were reviewed and interviews were conducted with Homeless Program Coordinators and Leaders from the following communities to learn the nature of their homeless issues and concerns and the programs they developed and funded to address those concerns. Plans were reviewed and interviews were conducted with Homeless Program Coordinators and Leaders from the following communities to learn the nature of their homeless issues and concerns and the programs they developed and funded to address those concerns. Topeka, Kansas Topeka, Kansas Kansas City, Missouri Kansas City, Missouri Clearwater, Florida Clearwater, Florida Springfield, Missouri Springfield, Missouri Colorado Springs, Colorado Colorado Springs, Colorado Additional Information and Homeless Service Programs and Plans were collected and reviewed from Additional Information and Homeless Service Programs and Plans were collected and reviewed from Hennipen County Minnesota (Minneapolis) Hennipen County Minnesota (Minneapolis) South Bend, Indiana South Bend, Indiana Salina, Kansas Salina, Kansas Wichita, Kansas Wichita, Kansas Des Moines, Iowa Des Moines, Iowa Denver, Colorado Denver, Colorado El Paso, Texas El Paso, Texas The Task force also reviewed the document published by the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (ICH) titled, “The 10-Year Planning Process to End Chronic Homelessness in Your Community: a Step-by-Step Guide. The Task force also reviewed the document published by the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (ICH) titled, “The 10-Year Planning Process to End Chronic Homelessness in Your Community: a Step-by-Step Guide.

23 23 7 Public Forums with Stakeholder Groups The Task Force conducted 7 forums with stakeholder groups and a community wide meeting between January 4 -11, The purpose of these forums was to solicit the input of various segments of the community concerned with homelessness into the Task Force plan. The 7 stakeholder groups are: Service providers, churches, education providers, and homeless advocates Service providers, churches, education providers, and homeless advocates General business community General business community Homeless individuals Homeless individuals LMH, Police, Parks and Recreation LMH, Police, Parks and Recreation Downtown businesses Downtown businesses Neighborhood Associations and neighbors Neighborhood Associations and neighbors Funders and local government Funders and local government

24 24 7 Public Forums with Stakeholder Groups General Comments Need 24/7 emergency shelter services to be continued and expanded Need 24/7 emergency shelter services to be continued and expanded Need a relief AND rehabilitation model Need a relief AND rehabilitation model Encourage self-sufficiency of the homeless population Encourage self-sufficiency of the homeless population Encourage coordination and cooperation with existing agencies and any new ones who come on board Encourage coordination and cooperation with existing agencies and any new ones who come on board Increase communication between all parties – police, business, landlords, local community Increase communication between all parties – police, business, landlords, local community Establish a method of identifying homelessness demographics and subsequent needs Establish a method of identifying homelessness demographics and subsequent needs Provide adequate affordable housing/housing subsidies Provide adequate affordable housing/housing subsidies Provide jobs counseling/education Provide jobs counseling/education Enforcement and/or adoption of ordinances to reduce/prevent unacceptable social activities downtown and in the community as a whole Enforcement and/or adoption of ordinances to reduce/prevent unacceptable social activities downtown and in the community as a whole Provide adequate mental health services Provide adequate mental health services

25 25 Observed Independent Outcomes During the two years the Task Force operated a number of independent critical events occurred that affected homeless services and programs. Some of these events were outgrowths of the Task Force’s influence. Others were not. Many things that occurred helped improve and expand homeless services or created a direction for implementation of the Task Force’s recommendations. These outcomes or events are indicators that the environment that existed in the community pre Task Force creation is not the same as exists today. A Deepened Communication and Coordination between Homeless Service Providers A Deepened Communication and Coordination between Homeless Service Providers Pursuit of Solutions and Realignment of Services by Homeless Service Providers Pursuit of Solutions and Realignment of Services by Homeless Service Providers The Loss of a Major Homeless Program Service Grant and the Funding of a New One The Loss of a Major Homeless Program Service Grant and the Funding of a New One The Closing of the LMH Inpatient Mental Health Unit The Closing of the LMH Inpatient Mental Health Unit Homeless Service Providers Willingness to Assume Responsibility to Implement or Attempt to Implement Task Force Recommendations Homeless Service Providers Willingness to Assume Responsibility to Implement or Attempt to Implement Task Force Recommendations

26 26 Observed Independent Outcomes The Practitioners Round Table was formed by a Task Force member with the facilitation assistance of the Center for Community Networking at the library. The membership consisted of homeless service providers and other entities working in the area including the police department. The group met a number of times to discuss what each entity could do presently to help improve services to the homeless and address homeless concerns issues. Some accomplishments that resulted were: Service Providers explored policies/procedures that could be changed to better serve homeless individuals and discussed ways to expand communications and case management for individuals being served by multiple agencies so that needed program interventions could take place before the individual failed and lost services or assistance. Service Providers explored policies/procedures that could be changed to better serve homeless individuals and discussed ways to expand communications and case management for individuals being served by multiple agencies so that needed program interventions could take place before the individual failed and lost services or assistance.

27 27 Observed Independent Outcomes A Deepened Communication and Coordination between Homeless Service Providers A Deepened Communication and Coordination between Homeless Service Providers Discussions moved forward regarding the establishment of a Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) which service providers agreed was needed to improve service delivery to the homeless. Discussions moved forward regarding the establishment of a Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) which service providers agreed was needed to improve service delivery to the homeless. Brought the police department into direct discussion about problems of homelessness and the role they can play in helping to address issues. Brought the police department into direct discussion about problems of homelessness and the role they can play in helping to address issues. Agreed that a Homeless Resource List would be developed for the police department to place in patrol cars. Agreed that a Homeless Resource List would be developed for the police department to place in patrol cars. Agreed that the service providers would develop a 2 hour orientation program for police officers. Agreed that the service providers would develop a 2 hour orientation program for police officers.

28 28 Observed Independent Outcomes Pursuit of Solutions and Realignment of Services by Homeless Service Providers As the Task Force identified needs and recommendations, service providers stepped forward to help address those needs. The Salvation Army and Lawrence Open Shelter/Drop In Center (now the Lawrence Community Shelter) coordinated the expansion of shelter hours to provide 24/7 services to the homeless. The Salvation Army and Lawrence Open Shelter/Drop In Center (now the Lawrence Community Shelter) coordinated the expansion of shelter hours to provide 24/7 services to the homeless. Salvation Army and Lawrence Open Shelter/Drop In Center submitted a CDBG joint application for public service funds to help support 24/7 Shelter Services. Salvation Army and Lawrence Open Shelter/Drop In Center submitted a CDBG joint application for public service funds to help support 24/7 Shelter Services. The Salvation Army and Lawrence Open Shelter collaborated on the development of coordinated House Rules. The Salvation Army and Lawrence Open Shelter collaborated on the development of coordinated House Rules. The Salvation Army and Lawrence Open Shelter established opened communications on joint clients. The Salvation Army and Lawrence Open Shelter established opened communications on joint clients.

29 29 Observed Independent Outcomes Pursuit of Solutions and Realignment of Services by Homeless Service Providers The Drop In Center merged with Lawrence Open Shelter to become Lawrence Community Shelter combining programs and staff to provide a limited service 24 hour shelter program. The Drop In Center merged with Lawrence Open Shelter to become Lawrence Community Shelter combining programs and staff to provide a limited service 24 hour shelter program. The Housing Authority offered to amend the definition of homeless to expand eligibility for the City HOME transitional housing program to families that are “doubled up”. The Housing Authority offered to amend the definition of homeless to expand eligibility for the City HOME transitional housing program to families that are “doubled up”. The Coalition for Homeless Concerns in association with the First Christian Church will open a temporary shelter at the church when the temperature goes above 90 or below 30 degrees and the other shelters are full. The Coalition for Homeless Concerns in association with the First Christian Church will open a temporary shelter at the church when the temperature goes above 90 or below 30 degrees and the other shelters are full.

30 30 Observed Independent Outcomes The Loss of a Major Homeless Program Service Grant and the Funding of a New One. In 2003 the City submitted an application to HUD under the Continuum of Care program for homeless initiatives. The results were: The Bert Nash Center lost its HUD funding for the “Bridges to Independence” Program, a temporary homeless housing program for the severely and persistently mentally ill. “Bridges” provided both temporary housing for persons being released from the state mental hospital under formal reintegration plans, and respite housing for persons from Lawrence in a mental health crisis. The program housed up to 8 adults. “Bridges” formally closed September 30, The Bert Nash Center lost its HUD funding for the “Bridges to Independence” Program, a temporary homeless housing program for the severely and persistently mentally ill. “Bridges” provided both temporary housing for persons being released from the state mental hospital under formal reintegration plans, and respite housing for persons from Lawrence in a mental health crisis. The program housed up to 8 adults. “Bridges” formally closed September 30, 2004.

31 31 The Housing Authority received funding for a three year grant to provide permanent housing for 10 chronically homeless individuals who are dual diagnosed with mental health and substance abuse problems who are willing to enter into a support service treatment plan. The program is called HOPE Building. Referrals into the program must come from The Salvation Army, Lawrence Community Shelter, or the P.A.T.H. Community Outreach worker. The service treatment plans are administered by the Bert Nash and DCCCA Centers. The program formally began January The Bert Nash “Bridges” house is one of the housing units used in the program. The Housing Authority received funding for a three year grant to provide permanent housing for 10 chronically homeless individuals who are dual diagnosed with mental health and substance abuse problems who are willing to enter into a support service treatment plan. The program is called HOPE Building. Referrals into the program must come from The Salvation Army, Lawrence Community Shelter, or the P.A.T.H. Community Outreach worker. The service treatment plans are administered by the Bert Nash and DCCCA Centers. The program formally began January The Bert Nash “Bridges” house is one of the housing units used in the program. Observed Independent Outcomes

32 32 Observed Independent Outcomes The Closing of the LMH Inpatient Mental Health Unit When LMH closed its inpatient mental health unit May 1, 2004 the entire community lost a critical medical crisis treatment program that cannot be compensated for with counseling and case management. The loss to the homeless and the precariously housed was even more acute. The homeless have no local treatment options when they suffer mental health breakdowns. The mentally disabled who are in housing have no treatment place to enter when they are in an acute stage of their illness. When this happens their behavior often results in lease violations which frequently lead to eviction. This frequently causes the person to become homeless. At least 30 percent of the current Lawrence homeless population was previously housed. When LMH closed its inpatient mental health unit May 1, 2004 the entire community lost a critical medical crisis treatment program that cannot be compensated for with counseling and case management. The loss to the homeless and the precariously housed was even more acute. The homeless have no local treatment options when they suffer mental health breakdowns. The mentally disabled who are in housing have no treatment place to enter when they are in an acute stage of their illness. When this happens their behavior often results in lease violations which frequently lead to eviction. This frequently causes the person to become homeless. At least 30 percent of the current Lawrence homeless population was previously housed.

33 33 Observed Independent Outcomes Homeless Service Providers Willing to Assume Responsibility to Implement or Attempt to Implement Task Force Recommendations With proper funding the following agencies have expressed a willingness to take on the implementation of some Task Force recommendations The Lawrence Community Shelter has expressed its willingness to expand its shelter to 100 homeless individuals and to develop a full range of support services with the goal of moving an individual to his or her highest level of performance in order that they can be successful in getting and keeping permanent housing. The operators of the shelter are open to moving the shelter to a new location. The Lawrence Community Shelter has expressed its willingness to expand its shelter to 100 homeless individuals and to develop a full range of support services with the goal of moving an individual to his or her highest level of performance in order that they can be successful in getting and keeping permanent housing. The operators of the shelter are open to moving the shelter to a new location. The Salvation Army is moving forward with its plans to construct a new shelter that will provide residential housing for 51 individuals and some families and children. The program will include support services to help individuals overcome the condition in their lives that led them to becoming homeless. The Salvation Army is moving forward with its plans to construct a new shelter that will provide residential housing for 51 individuals and some families and children. The program will include support services to help individuals overcome the condition in their lives that led them to becoming homeless. The Bert Nash Center has agreed to implement the mental health recommendations that fall within its mission and constituted authority. The Bert Nash Center has agreed to implement the mental health recommendations that fall within its mission and constituted authority. The Housing Authority has agreed to implement transitional and permanent housing goals that lie with in its mission and constituted authority. The Housing Authority has agreed to implement transitional and permanent housing goals that lie with in its mission and constituted authority.

34 34 Based upon its study and review the Task Force finds that: The homeless population has stabilized over the years to between persons. Chief among their problems are mental illness and substance abuse. The homeless population has stabilized over the years to between persons. Chief among their problems are mental illness and substance abuse. Local homeless services are geared to individuals and not families. Local homeless services are geared to individuals and not families. Local shelters are not sufficient to meet the needs of the homeless population. Local shelters are not sufficient to meet the needs of the homeless population. The Salvation Army’s future shelter and temporary housing program will help serve needs of homeless families as well as individuals. The Salvation Army’s future shelter and temporary housing program will help serve needs of homeless families as well as individuals. FindingsFindings

35 35 There is no formalized directed approach for moving homeless people to housing. There is no formalized directed approach for moving homeless people to housing. Central to moving homeless to housing is mental health and case management services. Central to moving homeless to housing is mental health and case management services. There is no community inpatient mental health unit to address crisis problems of the general community let alone the homeless. There is no community inpatient mental health unit to address crisis problems of the general community let alone the homeless. The Bert Nash Center is responsible for implementing integration and treatment plans for Douglas County residents released from the state mental hospital, yet the community has no temporary housing to assist in their reintegration. The Bert Nash Center is responsible for implementing integration and treatment plans for Douglas County residents released from the state mental hospital, yet the community has no temporary housing to assist in their reintegration. There is no social detoxification program in the community. There is no social detoxification program in the community. FindingsFindings

36 36 RecommendationsRecommendations The Task Force Recommends Six Major Initiatives to Help Address the Community’s Homeless Problems. These Six Initiatives are Spelled Out in the Full Task Force Report. The Initiatives fall into the Following Categories : Mental Health Service Plan Mental Health Service Plan Emergency and Shelter Services Plan Emergency and Shelter Services Plan Case Management Plan for the Community Case Management Plan for the Community Housing Program Plan Housing Program Plan Jobs Programs Plan Jobs Programs Plan Community Quality of Life Plan Community Quality of Life Plan

37 37 RecommendationsRecommendations Mental Health Service Plan The City Commission Request the Lawrence Memorial Hospital to Reopen the Crisis Mental Health Inpatient Unit The City Commission Request the Lawrence Memorial Hospital to Reopen the Crisis Mental Health Inpatient Unit An Emergency Outreach Team be Developed and Funded which would Include Medical and Clinical Staff to Address Physical Health, Mental Health, and Substance Abuse for Persons Experiencing Homelessness An Emergency Outreach Team be Developed and Funded which would Include Medical and Clinical Staff to Address Physical Health, Mental Health, and Substance Abuse for Persons Experiencing Homelessness Additional Housing be made Available for Persons Released from the State Mental Health Hospital who have no Home Additional Housing be made Available for Persons Released from the State Mental Health Hospital who have no Home Social Detoxification Services be Provided, such as those Currently Provided by DCCCA in Wichita Social Detoxification Services be Provided, such as those Currently Provided by DCCCA in Wichita The City of Lawrence Develop Clear Policy Guidelines and Provide Training for Police Officers on Appropriate Intervention with Persons Suffering from Mental Illness The City of Lawrence Develop Clear Policy Guidelines and Provide Training for Police Officers on Appropriate Intervention with Persons Suffering from Mental Illness

38 38 RecommendationsRecommendations Emergency and Shelter Plan Our Community Make Available an Emergency Shelter with Separate Accommodations for Individual Males, Individual Females, Families and Teens as well as Individuals who are Intoxicated or Have Substance Abuse Problems Our Community Make Available an Emergency Shelter with Separate Accommodations for Individual Males, Individual Females, Families and Teens as well as Individuals who are Intoxicated or Have Substance Abuse Problems Emergency Shelter Facilities should Include Beds, Showers, Daily Meals, Laundry Facilities, Day- Rooms, Gender Separation, Provision of Basic Clothing and Short-and-Long-Term Storage of Personal Items Emergency Shelter Facilities should Include Beds, Showers, Daily Meals, Laundry Facilities, Day- Rooms, Gender Separation, Provision of Basic Clothing and Short-and-Long-Term Storage of Personal Items Scope of Shelter to be Provided in the Community Should Include Additional Transitional Housing/Residential Centers Scope of Shelter to be Provided in the Community Should Include Additional Transitional Housing/Residential Centers The Shelter Program Should Consist of Relief and Rehabilitation Program Models that Include Heavy Reliance upon the Case Management Teams The Shelter Program Should Consist of Relief and Rehabilitation Program Models that Include Heavy Reliance upon the Case Management Teams

39 39 RecommendationsRecommendations Case Management and Programming Plan for the Community Four New Case Managers be Employed to Work with Individuals Experiencing Homelessness and Those At-Risk for Homelessness Four New Case Managers be Employed to Work with Individuals Experiencing Homelessness and Those At-Risk for Homelessness One New Outreach Caseworker be Employed to Work with Individuals Experiencing Homelessness and Those At-Risk for Homelessness One New Outreach Caseworker be Employed to Work with Individuals Experiencing Homelessness and Those At-Risk for Homelessness Case Managers Carry Out Duties under the Relief and Rehabilitation Shelter Model for Serving the Homeless Case Managers Carry Out Duties under the Relief and Rehabilitation Shelter Model for Serving the Homeless Housing Management Information System (HMIS) be Implemented As Soon As Possible Housing Management Information System (HMIS) be Implemented As Soon As Possible A 24/7 Information Hotline be Established for Homeless and Low Income/Near Homeless Individuals and Families in Need of Assistance A 24/7 Information Hotline be Established for Homeless and Low Income/Near Homeless Individuals and Families in Need of Assistance

40 40 RecommendationsRecommendations Housing Program Plan The City Continue to Provide HOME Funds to the Lawrence-Douglas County Housing Authority for its Transitional Program for the Homeless The City Continue to Provide HOME Funds to the Lawrence-Douglas County Housing Authority for its Transitional Program for the Homeless The Lawrence-Douglas County Housing Authority Expand its Targeted Eligible Population for HOME Transitional Housing to Include the Precariously Housed and Families that are “Doubled-Up” The Lawrence-Douglas County Housing Authority Expand its Targeted Eligible Population for HOME Transitional Housing to Include the Precariously Housed and Families that are “Doubled-Up” The City Purchase Land/Property For Affordable Rental Housing Development The City Purchase Land/Property For Affordable Rental Housing Development The Lawrence-Douglas County Housing Authority Endeavor to Expand its HOPE Building Program to Serve the Chronically Homeless Who May Not Have Dual Diagnosis The Lawrence-Douglas County Housing Authority Endeavor to Expand its HOPE Building Program to Serve the Chronically Homeless Who May Not Have Dual Diagnosis

41 41 RecommendationsRecommendations Jobs Program Plan A Meeting be Convened of Agencies Willing to Assist in Job Readiness Efforts A Meeting be Convened of Agencies Willing to Assist in Job Readiness Efforts A meeting be Convened with Downtown and Area Businesses to Discuss Possible Partnerships and Working with Candidates as they are Identified and Ready to Enter the Workforce A meeting be Convened with Downtown and Area Businesses to Discuss Possible Partnerships and Working with Candidates as they are Identified and Ready to Enter the Workforce A Meeting be Convened with Appropriate City Departments to Determine Possible Temporary and Full-Time Job Opportunities that are a Match to the Candidates from the Jobs Program A Meeting be Convened with Appropriate City Departments to Determine Possible Temporary and Full-Time Job Opportunities that are a Match to the Candidates from the Jobs Program City Provide Funding for Work-Related Costs. Such Costs may Include Transportation, Steel-Toed Shoes, Safety Glasses, Safety Gloves and Hard Hats, etc… City Provide Funding for Work-Related Costs. Such Costs may Include Transportation, Steel-Toed Shoes, Safety Glasses, Safety Gloves and Hard Hats, etc…

42 42 RecommendationsRecommendations Community and Quality of Life Plan A Community Commission on Homelessness be Established to Work With Existing Service Providers and Agencies to Facilitate and Make Recommendations to the City Commission Regarding the Implementation of this Plan A Community Commission on Homelessness be Established to Work With Existing Service Providers and Agencies to Facilitate and Make Recommendations to the City Commission Regarding the Implementation of this Plan A Community Cooperation Committee be Formed to Address Common Concerns Regarding Homelessness Issues. This Committee should Provide a Vehicle for Communications Among all Aspects of our Community Regarding these Issues A Community Cooperation Committee be Formed to Address Common Concerns Regarding Homelessness Issues. This Committee should Provide a Vehicle for Communications Among all Aspects of our Community Regarding these Issues To Be Included in the Work of These Committees is a Review of Existing Ordinances with Police Department Guidance to Address Nuisance and Problem Behaviors as well as Safety Concerns. Existing Ordinances Should be Enforced and New Ordinances Should Be Developed to Address the Impact of Homelessness on Quality of Life Issues To Be Included in the Work of These Committees is a Review of Existing Ordinances with Police Department Guidance to Address Nuisance and Problem Behaviors as well as Safety Concerns. Existing Ordinances Should be Enforced and New Ordinances Should Be Developed to Address the Impact of Homelessness on Quality of Life Issues

43 43  This Community Should Approach Homelessness and Homeless Services With the Goal of Ending Chronic Homelessness Within 10 Years. Homeless Services and Programs Begun Under This Plan Should Evolve and Change As Research, Treatment and Service Approaches, Initiatives, and Funding Change. With This Goal in Mind the Community Commissions Should Continually Monitor the Impact and State of Homelessness in Lawrence and Advise Service Providers, the Community, and the City Commission On How Well We Are Meeting the Objectives Under This Plan and Areas Where Changes May Be Indicated. RecommendationsRecommendations

44 44 Identified Cost Estimates Based on the recommendations the cost estimates to implement the plan over a three year period, funded with a combination of public and private sources, have been identified. Program New (N)$1,387,800 Existing (E)$600,000 Subtotal $1,987,800 Facility New$2,550,000 Ongoing$200,000 Subtotal $2,750,000

45 45 Forming of committees, administrative support $6,000(N) Jobs administrative support for meetings with agencies, businesses, City $6,000(N) transportation assistance $3,600(N) safety gear $2,400(N) Mental health emergency outreach team $220,000(N) policies & training for police -0- Case management 4 new case managers $161,000(N) HMIS first year, start up $20,000(N) Housing HOME funding (current & ongoing) $200,000(E) Facilities emergency shelter, Phase I $500,000(N) First Year $1,119,000

46 46 Second Year $2,169,400 Continuing expenditures from first year including HOME $599,000(E) including HOME $599,000(E) Additional second year expenditures Additional second year expenditures Case management – outreach worker $42,000(N) Mental health – additional housing $14,400(N) HMIS – second year $14,000(N) Facility – emergency shelter, Phase II $1,500,000(N)

47 47 Third Year $1,449,400 Continuing expenditures, years 1 and 2 $669,400(E) Additional third year expenditures Case management – 24/7 hotline $30,000(N) Facility - Emergency shelter – Phase III $550,000(N) Ongoing vehicle, utilities, maintenance $200,000(N) Total for three years is $4,737,800 Total for three years is $4,737,800 Ongoing annual expenses Programs $673,400 Facility $200,000


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