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October 2014 TITLE I AND MCKINNEY-VENTO: DEVELOPING A COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIP 26 TH ANNUAL NAEHCY CONFERENCE KANSAS CITY, MO.

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Presentation on theme: "October 2014 TITLE I AND MCKINNEY-VENTO: DEVELOPING A COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIP 26 TH ANNUAL NAEHCY CONFERENCE KANSAS CITY, MO."— Presentation transcript:

1 October 2014 TITLE I AND MCKINNEY-VENTO: DEVELOPING A COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIP 26 TH ANNUAL NAEHCY CONFERENCE KANSAS CITY, MO

2 Donna Cash, McKinney-Vento State Coordinator and Supervisor for Title I Charter Schools in St. Louis and Kansas City State of Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education PO Box 480 Jefferson City, MO (573) PRESENTER INFORMATION

3  Gain information and knowledge about Title I, Part A and the McKinney-Vento Act.  Gain an understanding of what the requirements are for serving homeless students under Title I, Part A and McKinney-Vento.  Discover the acceptable uses of Title I, Part A reservation of funds and learn methods to determine your reservation of funds (sometimes referred to as a “set-aside”).  Learn how to begin the development of strategies for state and district level collaborations. DURING THIS PRESENTATION, YOU WILL...

4 HOMELESSNESS IN AMERICA No longer just that image of the ragged man sleeping on the city street, it is the face of a once middle-class family with children sleeping in parked cars or living in hotel/motels. It is the single mom with two preschoolers who doubles-up with other families. It is the gay, unemployed teenager, banished by his parents and now sleeping in a friend’s camper. It is the brother and sister awaiting foster care placement. It also may be several hundred students displaced by a tornado, flood, or winter storm. Riley, K., & Sweeney, J. (2014). Serving Homeless Students: A Practical Guide to Title I and Other Federal Programs (Vol. Second Edition, p. Introduction, ix). Palm Beach Gardens, FL: LRP Publications.

5 TITLE I PART A

6 TITLE I, PART A Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended (20 U.S.C. § 6301 et seq., 2001) Was originally part of President Johnson’s “War on Poverty” and was reauthorized under the No Child Left Behind Act in  Gives financial assistance to schools (based on low-income data) and is a formula grant.  Used to help ensure all children meet challenging state academic standards.  Specifically requires collaboration with McKinney-Vento programs to serve homeless children and youth.  Policy changes in 2014 concerning McKinney-Vento.

7 THE McKINNEY-VENTO ACT

8 The McKinney-Vento Act (42 U.S.C et seq., 2001)  Passed in 1987 by President Reagan  Named after Rep. Stewart McKinney (R-CT) & Rep. Bruce Vento (D-MN)  Subtitle VII-B focuses on the education of children and youth experiencing homelessness—Federal Education for Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) Program.  Reauthorized by Title X, Part C of the ESEA, as amended.  The Act also gives us the definition of homelessness used by LEAs and also outlines the rights given to eligible students to equal access to a free and appropriate public education.  Funding is provided through a formula. MCKINNEY-VENTO ACT

9 TITLE I, PART A ELIGIBILITY AND HOMELESS STUDENTS

10 HOMELESS CHILDREN AND YOUTH  Are automatically eligible for Title I, Part A services—whether or not they attend a Title I, Part A school or meet the academic standards required of other students for eligibility. (U.S. Department of Education [ED], 2004)  They may receive these services under a schoolwide or targeted assistance program.  They can receive services even if not attending a Title I school, through the Part A set-aside (reservation).  This provision also allows homeless students who are doing well academically to receive additional non-instructional education related support services needed to succeed in school.  LEA plans should include a description of the services to be provided to homeless students and the collaboration between the two programs.

11 SCHOOLWIDE PROGRAMS Title I, Part A schoolwide programs are...  Focused on the overall school improvement in order to increase the academic achievement of all students.  Schoolwide programs shall include:  A comprehensive needs assessment of the whole school.  Include reform strategies that provide opportunities for all children to meet state academic achievement standards. 20 U.S.C (b) (1)  Homeless student needs should be reflected in the comprehensive needs assessment and the programs reform strategies and services.

12 TARGETED ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Title I, Part A targeted programs are... Those programs which provide services to a select group of at-risk students  specifically those children who are...  Failing or  Most at risk of failing to meet state academic standards Programs may include:  Extended learning time for students—before, after or summer school  Professional development for school personnel  Parent involvement activities  Health, nutrition, and other social services (not readily available)  Basic medical equipment (such as eyeglasses, hearing aides, etc.) 20 U.S.C (b) (1), 20 U.S.C (e)(2)

13 SERVING HOMELESS STUDENTS WITH THE TITLE I, PART A SET-ASIDE Districts must set aside funds:  To be used to serve homeless children not attending Title I schools.  To provide services comparable to those provided to children attending Title I schools 20 U.S.C (c)(3).  Districts may provide homeless students with services that are not ordinarily provided to other Title I students and are not available from other sources (EHCY Guidance, M-4).

14 USE OF TITLE I FUNDS  Districts may use set-aside funds to provide educationally related support services to children in shelters and other locations 20U.S.C (c)(3) Set-aside funds must be used:  To provide services that are reasonable and necessary to assist students in taking advantage of educational opportunities.  As a last resort when funds or services are not reasonably available from other sources (Title I, Part A ARRA Guidance, G-11).

15 Outreach services Basic needs Counseling services Supplemental instruction Local liaison (see recent change) Parental involvement programs Research-based programs Data collection Clothing (i.e.--uniforms) Clothing and schools for PE School supplies Before/after school, and/or summer programs Birth certificates Immunizations Food Medical and dental services Eyeglasses and hearing aids School fees for classes Fees for AP and IB testing Fees for SAT and ACT testing GED testing for school age students Transportation (see recent change) USE OF TITLE I FUNDS

16 DETERMINING A SET-ASIDE AMOUNT There are no mandates in Federal law for a particular method or formula, instead it allows the discretion be made at the district level. The Title I, Part A director and local liaison should work together to determine the amount of set-aside for the LEA. Use the following data to help determine your set-aside.  number of homeless students  student outcomes and needs  community information and resources LEAs should conduct an annual assessment of the needs of homeless students (more on that later) to reflect current data and trends in their homeless population.

17 DETERMINING A SET-ASIDE AMOUNT Once student needs are identified, the amount of funds necessary to provide services should be determined.  Should be sufficient to impact student outcomes Homeless students experience unique needs.  Therefore Title I services provided to homeless students may need to be greater in scope and intensity or different in nature than those normally provided to non-homeless students

18 DETERMINING A SET-ASIDE AMOUNT Method #1— Reserve the set aside amount on what you would be eligible for if you were applying for a McKinney-Vento subgrant. Method #2— Reserve the set aside amount based on a percentage of the district’s Title I allocation. Method #3— Reserve the set aside amount based on your homeless student count and Title I, Part A per-pupil allocation. Method #4— Reserve the set aside amount based on homeless student’s needs.

19 2014 CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT 2014 Omnibus Bill  Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 (H.R. 3547)  Governs funds for FY 2014 and also carryover funds for FY 2012 and FY 2013  Provides new authority for Title I funds to be used for: --the salary of the LEA Liaison --pay for transportation to school of origin

20 COLLABORATIONS McKinney-Vento and Title I A Programs

21 HOW DO YOU EAT AN ELEPHANT? Why, one bite at a time! Disclaimer— No elephants were eaten during the development of this presentation.

22 HOW DO COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS BEGIN? Partnerships begin because individuals reach out to like-minded people and groups to address issues that affect children and families.

23 BUILDING YOUR NETWORK... To create your network (or collaborations) establish professional working relationships with:  School Counselors/Social Workers  Secretaries/registrars (enrollment staff)  School recourse and attendance officers  Program administrators for Special Education  Child nutrition  Title I, Title III, Migrant and Early Childhood  Principals and Teachers  Transportation Directors and Bus Drivers  Parents and unaccompanied homeless youth  Family and parent involvement centers  Student services staff  Nurses  Shelter-based school liaisons  Who else would you add to this list?

24 UNDERSTANDING COLLABORATION Be sure to involve community members, parents, and other partners in developing an understanding of the context for collaboration. You may want to consider the following questions:  Which stakeholders have an interest in the partnership you are planning?  Who might be willing to join your collaboration? Will the attitudes and culture of the school, the school district, and the community support the partnership?  Are the school, district, and other potential partners willing to share their resources and capacities?  How do the interests of each potential partner fit into the broader collaboration? How can administrators of specific programs (e.g., Title I, special education, school volunteers) join with other partners in a unified effort?

25 WHY COLLABORATE? There is no question that the concept of collaboration among programs serving children has value. Remember...  Programs do not exist in isolation and they cannot “go it alone”.  Collaboration leverages scarce resources, eliminate unnecessary duplications (paper work and personnel), helps an LEA reach a larger percentage of their student population, and increases access to a wider range of services than they might otherwise use or even know about.

26 COLLABORATIONS The process of building a collaborative partnership is multidimensional. It involves: recognizing opportunities for change; mobilizing people and resources to create changes; developing a vision of long-term change; seeking support and involvement from diverse and non-traditional partners; choosing an effective group structure; building trust among collaborators; and developing learning opportunities for partners.

27 NEEDS ASSESSMENT

28 WHY DO I NEED A NEEDS ASSESSMENT? Before you can determine what your needs are you have to understand what you have and what you may need. This requires developing a clear picture of your homeless student population and their needs. What challenges do my homeless students face? What resources does the LEA already have? Or need? How large is my homeless population? What are my students... academic needs health needs social needs emotional needs Just what do my students need to be successful? How can I obtain the help I need—services, supplies, personnel? More importantly how do I provide my students with “comparable education” services?

29 ON-LINE RESOURCES

30 RESOURCES NATIONAL CENTER FOR HOMELESS EDUCATION Supporting the Education of Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness MCKINNEY-VENTO LAW INTO PRACTICE BRIEF SERIES Serving Students Experiencing Homelessness under Title I, Part A NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND FINANCIAL COMPLIANCE INSIDER, November Brownstone Publishers, Inc., 149 Fifth Ave., New York, NY MCKINNEY-VENTO 2001—LAW INTO PRACTICE The Education of Students in Homeless Situations in the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act: Summary of McKinney-Vento Act and Title I Provisions

31 RESOURCES U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DEAR COLLEAGUE LETTER, JULY 22, 2014 Letter regarding new authority in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, NATIONAL CENTER FOR HOMELESS EDUCATION CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, TITLE I, PART A LEGISLATION, REGULATIONS, AND GUIDANCE: NATIONAL CENTER FOR HOMELESS EDUCATION EDUCATING HOMELESS CHILDREN AND YOUTH: CONDUCTING NEEDS ASSESSMENTS AND EVALUATING SERVICES—A GUIDE FOR SEAS, LEAS, AND LOCAL SCHOOLS

32 QUESTIONS?


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