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By Shanna Holt.  Authoritarian: Highly controlling, little responsiveness.  Permissive/Indulgent: Highly responsive, little control.  Authoritative:

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Presentation on theme: "By Shanna Holt.  Authoritarian: Highly controlling, little responsiveness.  Permissive/Indulgent: Highly responsive, little control.  Authoritative:"— Presentation transcript:

1 By Shanna Holt

2  Authoritarian: Highly controlling, little responsiveness.  Permissive/Indulgent: Highly responsive, little control.  Authoritative: Highly Controlling, highly responsive.  Uninvolved/Neglectful: Little control, little responsiveness.

3  Children also have styles called temperaments.  Parenting is interactive; a child’s temperament and their parent’s style of parenting mesh, each affecting the other.

4  Authoritarian parents are strict and highly controlling.  They set high standards and expect obedience and maturity from their children.  They expect their rules to be followed and not to be questioned.  Authoritarian parents love their children but can seem aloof, rarely showing affection.

5 Example: “Because I said so!” “My way or the highway!” “You’ll do as I say when I say it!”

6  Children with Authoritarian parents tend to be quiet, obedient, and stay out of trouble.  They feel guilty and depressed, internalizing their frustrations.  They lack self esteem, confidence, spontaneity, and curiosity.  They tend to be socially withdrawn and have difficulties forming relationships.  As adolescents, they sometimes rebel, leaving home before age 20.

7  Permissive parents are warm and accepting but exert little control over their children.  Very low levels of maturity and demands are required of their children.  Extensive parent-child communication but little discipline.  Parent is more of a friend than a disciplinary figure.  They are supportive, but do not feel responsible for shaping their children.

8  These children are impulsive and lack self control.  They tend to be selfish and immature because they’re not taught how their actions affect others.  They tend to achieve less at school and have trouble forming relationships.  They usually maintain a good relationship with their parents into adulthood.

9  Authoritative parents are firm but kind. They set limits and use natural consequences to help their children learn.  They set high standards and encourage independence.  They demand maturity but are more forgiving than punishing if the child does something wrong.  Authoritative parents consider themselves more as guides rather than authorities or friends.

10  This parenting style gives the best outcomes. This child is cheerful, self-controlled, lively and self-reliant.  The have good self confidence, are achievement orientated and socially successful.  They cope well with stress and regulate their emotions well.  Teachers and peers usually like these children.

11  Uninvolved parents demand little and respond minimally.  There are no rules for the child but also no communication or encouragement from the parent.  Parents don’t know what their kids are doing and seem not to care.  This parenting style is often associated with neglect and abuse.

12  Like children of authoritarian parents, these children are socially withdrawn and lack self esteem.  They are not securely emotionally attached to their parents and this leads to confusion and depression.  They are more likely to engage in anti-social and/or risky behavior. Many exhibit antisocial behavior and may end up as criminals.  They are the worst performing of all the parenting styles.  The combination of permissiveness and indifference or rejection in varying degrees has detrimental effects on children.

13 “Children everywhere benefit if they believe that their parents appreciate them; by the same token, children everywhere suffer if they feel rejected and unwanted.” (Berger, Kathleen Stassen. Invitation to the Life Span. New York: Worth, Print.)

14 The End Sources:  Berger, Kathleen Stassen. Invitation to the Life Span. New York: Worth, Print.  Gurian, Anita. "Parenting Styles/Children's Temperaments: The Match | AboutOurKids.org." Parenting Styles/Children's Temperaments: The Match. NYU Child Study Center, n.d. Web. 02 Apr  "Effects Of Parenting Style." Effects Of Parenting Style. All-About- Motherhood.com, n.d. Web. 02 Apr  Sailor, D. H. "Effects of Parenting Styles on Children's Behavior (page 2)." Effects of Parenting Styles on Children's Behavior. Education.com, n.d. Web. 02 Apr  Moore, Ayra. "The Impact of Parenting Styles on Children's Development." LIVESTRONG.COM. N.p., 12 Sept Web. 02 Apr


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