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Methodologies for Developing and Improving Information Literacy Assessment Techniques Meggan Houlihan Coordinator of Instruction and Reference The American.

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Presentation on theme: "Methodologies for Developing and Improving Information Literacy Assessment Techniques Meggan Houlihan Coordinator of Instruction and Reference The American."— Presentation transcript:

1 Methodologies for Developing and Improving Information Literacy Assessment Techniques Meggan Houlihan Coordinator of Instruction and Reference The American University in Cairo

2 After this workshop, participants will be able to: Identify and utilize various forms of assessment in order to increase student learning at your home institution.

3 Debra L Gilchrist. (2009). A TWENTY YEAR PATH: Learning about assessment; learning from assessment. Communications in Information Literacy, 3(2), 70. Knowing what you are doing Knowing why you are doing it Knowing what students are learning as a result Changing because of the information

4 Learning OutcomesMission Statements Are statements designed to specify what learners will be able to know or to do as a result of learning activity What do you want the student to take away? Are statements of purpose What is the role of your IL department in the library and university?

5 One-shot Learning Outcome: Determine which subject specific resources are the most appropriate for the research topic, in order to retrieve relevant articles from journals, magazines, or newspapers. AUC IL Mission Statement: The AUC Libraries Information Literacy Department provides classes, workshops, orientations and seminars that aim to increase the information literacy levels of students, faculty and all members of the AUC community.

6 Assessment Summative assessment. (n.d.). LEARN NC. Retrieved April 02, 2012, from Michelle Kathleen Dunaway, & Michael Teague Orblych. (2011). Formative assessment: Transforming information literacy instruction. Reference Services Review, 39(1), “Formative Assessment refers to the processes used to elicit evidence of students’ learning that is used by the instructor to determine what students know, and what they still need to learn” “Summative Assessments are cumulative evaluations used to measure student growth after instruction and are generally given at the end of a course in order to determine whether long term learning goals have been met.”

7 Authentic Assessment Wiggins, G. P. Assessing Student Performance. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers, “engaging and worthy problems or questions of importance, in which students must use knowledge to fashion performances effectively and creatively. The tasks are either replicas of or analogous to the kinds of problems faced by adult citizens and consumers or professionals in the field.”

8 THINK! GROUP! SHARE!

9 Debra L Gilchrist. (2009). A TWENTY YEAR PATH: Learning about assessment; learning from assessment. Communications in Information Literacy, 3(2), 70.

10 Megan Oakleaf. (2009). WRITING INFORMATION LITERACY ASSESSMENT PLANS: A guide to best practice. Communications in Information Literacy, 3(2), 80. Information Literacy Assessment Plan Purpose Theory Links to Strategic Documents Structures Resources Data Policies Goals & Outcomes Timeline for Continuous Assessment

11 Guidelines for Instruction Programs in Academic Libraries. (Oct. 2011). Association of College and Research Libraries. Retrieved April 1, 2012, from: E. Evaluation and assessment Evaluation and assessment of an instruction program are systematic ongoing processes that inform and guide Library strategic direction. A program evaluation plan is useful for assessing a Library instruction program’s success and viability. Program evaluation should be based on the Library’s mission and goals and include: Measures of evaluation based on specific a) student learning outcomes and b) overall program goals; A variety of indirect and direct measures assessing various aspects of the program, e.g. needs assessment, participant reaction, teaching effectiveness, overall effectiveness of program; Regular data collection and analysis using such measures; Periodic revision of program based on data analysis; A feedback loop that assesses the sustainability of the program; and Coordination of assessment with library administration and teaching faculty where appropriate

12 THINK! GROUP! SHARE!

13 So Now What…. Complete a SWOT Analysis Create goals Identify and include all stakeholders Create a timeline Be active and engaged Prioritize assessment efforts Ask for help Communicate with each other! Do everything with a clear purpose

14 ACRL Guidelines Objectives for Information Literacy Instruction: A Model Statement for Academic Librarians Characteristics of Programs of Information Literacy that Illustrate Best Practices: A Guideline Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Association of College and Research Libraries Standards for Proficiencies for Instruction Librarians and Coordinators

15 References Adriana J. Gonzalez. (2009). Needs assessment of library instruction at texas A&M university libraries using student feedback. Performance Measurement and Metrics, 10(2), Arndt, R. M. (2009). Library and information literacy. Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN : Official Publication of the Emergency Department Nurses Association, 35(4), Baldwin, V. (2008). Resources for assessment of information literacy. Science & Technology Libraries, 28(4), doi: / Bonnie Gratch Lindauer. (2005). The three arenas of information literacy assessment. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 44(2), 122. Carol McCulley. (2009). MIXING AND MATCHING: Assessing information literacy. Communications in Information Literacy, 3(2), 171. Debra L Gilchrist. (2009). A TWENTY YEAR PATH: Learning about assessment; learning from assessment. Communications in Information Literacy, 3(2), 70. Elizabeth Choinski, & Michelle Emanuel. (2006). The one-minute paper and the one-hour class. Reference Services Review, 34(1), Julie M. Chapman, Charlcie Pettway, & Michelle White. (2001). The portfolio: An instruction program assessment tool. Reference Services Review, 29(4), Lorrie A. Knight. (2002). The role of assessment in library user education. Reference Services Review, 30(1),

16 Megan Oakleaf. (2009). The information literacy instruction assessment cycle. Journal of Documentation, 65(4), doi: / Megan Oakleaf. (2009). WRITING INFORMATION LITERACY ASSESSMENT PLANS: A guide to best practice. Communications in Information Literacy, 3(2), 80. Michelle Kathleen Dunaway, & Michael Teague Orblych. (2011). Formative assessment: Transforming information literacy instruction. Reference Services Review, 39(1), Scott Walter. (2009). BUILDING A "SEAMLESS ENVIRONMENT" FOR ASSESSMENT OF INFORMATION LITERACY: Libraries, student affairs, and learning outside the classroom. Communications in Information Literacy, 3(2), 91. Thomas, J. (2011). Fostering information literacy. Learning & Leading with Technology, 39(2), 30. Walsh, A. (2009). Information literacy assessment: Where do we start? JOURNAL OF LIBRARIANSHIP AND INFORMATION SCIENCE, 41(1), Warmkessel, M. (2007). Information literacy assessment. Public Services Quarterly, 3(1),


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